The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Magazine search: Astounding and Analog
 from antiquity to 2017



   “Creatures of the Light”
by Sophie Wenzel Ellis
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1930

I think this was the first time-travel story that Astounding ever ran, although the time travel is incidental to the story in which handsome Northwood pursues an artificially created superman who can jump just a few moments into the future.

 Before Northwoods horrified sight, he vanished; vanished as though he had turned suddenly to air and floated away. 






   Astounding’s The Readers’ Corner
edited by Harry Bates
First letters column: Astounding Stories of Super Science, Mar 1930

Before modern-day blogs and online fora, before Astounding Science Fictions Brass Tacks letters’ column, there was The Readers’ Corner of Astounding Stories of Super Science, where at the leisurely pace of once a month, readers vehemently mixed it up about all topics—including time travel.

 Dear Editor: Thus far the chief objection to time traveling has been this: if a person was sent back into the past or projected into the future, it would be possible for said person to interfere most disastrously with his own birth. —Arthur Berkowitz, 768 Beck Street, Bronx, N.Y. (Mar 1932)

Dear Editor: I write this letter to comment, not on the stories, which satisfy me, but on a few letters in the “Corner” of the March issue; especially Mr. Berkowitz’ letter. . . . Since he brought up the question of the time-traveler interfering disasterously with his own birth, I will discuss it. . . . Back he goes into time and meets his grandfather, before his fathers birth. For some reason John kills his grandfather. —Robert Feeney, 5334 Euclid, Kansas City, Mo. (Jun 1932)

Dear Editor: I read and enjoyed Mr. Feeneys interesting letter in the June issue, but wish to ask: Why pick on grandfather? . . . This incessant murdering of harmless ancestors must stop. —Donald Allgeier, Mountain Grove, Mo. (Jan 1933)
 




   “Monsters of Moyen”
by Arthur J. Burks
First publication: Astounding, Apr 1930

When the U.S. is attacked with monsters and combination submarine/aeroplanes by the Asian demagog Moyen, it's up to Professor Mariel to find a way to save the country, possibly even through the manipulation of time!

 In this, I have even been compelled to manipulate in the matter of time! I must not only defeat and annihilate the minions of Moyen, but must work from a mathematical absurdity, so that at the moment of impact that moment itself must become part of the past, sufficiently remote to remove the monsters at such distance from the earth that not even the might genius of Moyen can return them! 




   “The Atom-Smasher”
by Victor Rousseau
First publication: Astounding, May 1930

We've got the evil Professor Tode who modifies an atom-smasher into a time machine that travels to the paleolithic age and Atlantis, a fatherly older professor, his beautiful young daughter (menaced by evil Tode), casually written racist pronouncements (by Rousseau), and our hero scientist, dashing Jim Dent. But my favorite sentence was the brief description of quantum mechanics, which I didn’t expect in a 1930 science fiction tale.

 The Planck-Bohr quantum theory that the energy of a body cannot vary continuously, but only by a certain finite amount, or exact multiples of this amount, had been the key that unlocked the door. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Phantoms of Reality” by Ray Chandler, Astounding, Jan 1930 [parallel universes ]



   “The Meteor Girl”
by Jack Williamson
First publication: Astounding, Mar 1931

When a meteor lands on the beachfront airfield of our narrator and his partner Charlie King, Charlie realizes that it provides a portal through space-time through which they view the death-at-sea of Charlie’s ex-fiancée.

 A terrestrial astronomer may reckon that the outburst on Nova Persei occurred a century before the great fire of London, but an astronomer on the Nova may reckon with equal accuracy that the great fire occurred a century before the outburst on the Nova. 


Jack Williamson, Master Traveller

In the 1930s alone, Williamson had five classic time travel stories culminating with “The Legion of Time,” to be followed by what has to be the first of the let’s-kill-Hitler stories and another seven decades of unmatched science fiction.





   The Exile of Time
by Ray Cummings
First publication: Astounding Stories, Apr-Jul 1931

George Rankin and his best friend Larry rescue an hysterical Mistress Mary Atwood from a locked New York City basement only to find that she believes she’s come from more than 150 years in the past, chased by a crazy man named Tugh and his mad robot, Migul.

 Lets try and reduce it to rationality. The cage was—is, I should ay, since of course it still exists—that cage is a Time-traveling vehicle. It is traveling back and forth through Time, operated by a Robot. 




   “The Man from 2071”
by Sewell Peaslee Wright
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1931

Special Patrol Service officer John Hanson (hero of ten Wright stories) stumbles upon a mad inventor who has traveled many centuries to Hanson’s beachfront Denver in order to obtain knowledge that will let him become the absolute, unquestioned, supreme master back in the 21st century.

 I could not help wondering, as we settle swiftly over the city, whether our historians and geologists and other scientists were really right in saying that Denver had at one period been far from the Pacific. 




   “The Port of Missing Planes”
by Capt. S.P. Meek
First publication: Astounding, Aug 1931

Capt. Meek’s hero, Dr. Bird (an agent of the Bureau of Standards), had at least one minor run-in with time travel in this story of underground molemen (who excavate their tunnels by time travel) who have been duped by the evil Saranoff into serving as a base for Saranoff’s attacks on the southwestern United States (as well as an attack on Dr. Bird’s brain, which is in peril of being sent back in time).

 “I wish I could remember how that time machine was built and operated,” said Dr. Bird reflectively, as he sat in his private laboratory in the Bureau of Standards some time later, “but Jumor did his work well. I cant even remember what the thing looked like.” 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Fifth-Dimension Catapult” by Murray Leinster, Astounding, Jan 1931 [parallel universes ]

“Hell’s Dimension” by Tom Curry, Astounding, Apr 1931 [differing time rates ]

Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Einstein See-Saw” by Miles J. Breuer, Astounding, Apr 1932 [monster-filled universes ]



   “Ancestral Voices”
by Nat Schachner
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1933

Time traveler Emmet Pennypacker kills one ancient Hun and without realizing who will disappear from the racist world of 1935.

This is the first issue of Astounding that lists F. Orlin Tremaine as editor, although he began that job two months earlier, and I think this is the first time-travel story that he published.

 The year of grace 1935! A dull year, a comfortable year! Nothing much happened. The depression was over; people worked steadily at their jobs and forgot that they had every starved; Roosevelt was still President of the United States; Hitler was firmly ensconced in Germany; France talked of security; Japan continued to defend itself against China by swallowing a few more provinces; Russia was about to commence on the third Five Year Plan, to be completed in two years; and, oh, yes—Cuba was still in revolution. 


The story also appeared in the third volume of Williamson’s collected stories (Sep 2000)   “Terror Out of Time”
by Jack Williamson
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1933

Until I started reading these 1930s pulps, I didn’t realize how ubiquitous were the scientist with a beautiful daughter and her adventurous fiancé. This story has Dr. Audrin, his machine to project the brain of a present-day man forty million years into the future and possibly bring another mind back, his beautiful daughter Eve, and her manly fiancé, Terry Webb, who agrees to be the test subject for the machine.

 I must have a subject. And there is a certain—risk. Not great, now, Im sure. My apparatus is improved. But, in my first trial, my subject was—injured. Ive been wondering, Mr. Webb, if you— 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Fifth-Dimension Tube” by Murray Leinster, Astounding, Jan 1933 [parallel universes ]

   “The Retreat from Utopia”
by Wallace West
First publication: Astounding, Mar 1934

A newspaper reporter from 2175 describes his strict, puritan world where nobody is happy because nothing ever happens, and even the criminals off in Borneo refuse to rejoin that society, so the story’s 1934 narrator visits the future to set things right.

This NY Times headline from Jun 11, 1934, describes an American Rocket Society test flight; Schachner was one of the founding members of the society.   “The Time Impostor”
by Nat Schachner
First publication: Astounding, Mar 1934

Newspaper reporter Derek leaps into a time machine that has come back from the 9th millennium to rescue the condemned murderer Mike Spinnot because he’s worshiped as a hero in that future time.

   “The Long Night”
by Charles Willard Diffin
First publication: Astounding, May 1934

Garry Coyne devises a way to move into the future via suspended animation, which (as we all know) is not time travel, but once he arrives in the future to fight throwback homoids and take shelter with the small band of normal men, he does have a moment where he slides back to the present for a brief communication with his trusted friend and a realization about the nature of time.

 Past, present, future—all one. And we, moving along the dimension called time, intersect them. I cant grasp it. But I cant deny it. If only there were proof— 


   “Time Haven”
by Howard Wandrei (as by Howard W. Graham, Ph.D.)
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1934

Vincent Merryfield, the “alien” of his family for the sin of being a scientist, builds a time machine that takes him to the year 2443 where the rest of his family has died out and he is the sole owner of everything within sight of his seven-mile-high tower in Manhattan—but how did everyone know he was coming? Sadly, it may be that he never really traveled through time, but I had to put artist and writer Howard Wandrei into my list nonetheless. A later story, “The Missing Ocean” (May 1939), follows much the same time-travelless plot.

 Of course! It has always been known that you would ‘appear’ sooner or later. 


   “Inflexure”
by H.L. Gold (as by Clyde Crane Campbell)
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1934

Some rogue object passing through the solar system manages to merge together all people from all times of Earth.

 Im over the Caroline Islands, longitude 158° 23´ west, latitude 8° 30´ north. Therere millions of people drowning all around me. What shall I do? 


H.L. Gold, Master Traveller

H.L. Gold wrote the earliest story of different eras living side-by-side because of some sort of time storm or, as he called it, an “Inflexure.” But even without that innovation, Gold would deserve an award for the volumes of time travel stories he published as the first Galaxy editor.





   “Twilight”
by John W. Campbell, Jr. (as by Don Stuart)
First publication: Astounding, Nov 1934

In 1932, James Waters Bendell picks up a magnificently sculpted hitchhiker named Ares Sen Kenlin (the Sen means he’s a scientist, but Waters is just a name) who says that he’s trying to get back to his home time (3059) from seven million years in the future—a time when mankind has atrophied because of their reliance on machines.

 They stand about, little misshapen men with huge heads. But their heads contain only brains. They had machines that could think—but somebody turned them off a long time ago, and no one knew how to start them again. That was the trouble with them. They had wonderful brains. Far better than yours or mine. But it must have been millions of years ago when they were turned off, too, and they just hadnt thought since then. Kindly little people. 


John W. Campbell, Jr., Master Traveller

Campbell’s three time travel stories were published under his pseudonym of Don Stuart before he took over the reins of Astounding, and even together they would not justify the prestigious Master Traveller Citation. But the number of classic time travel yarns he brought to light at Astounding and Analog make him more than worthy.





   “Alas, All Thinking”
by Harry Bates
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1935

Charles Wayland is tasked with discovering why his cold-hearted college buddy and all-around genius (I.Q. 248) physicist Harlan T. Frick has abandoned everything technical for mundane pursuits such as golfing, clothes, travel, fishing, night clubs, and so on—and the explanation may have to do with either Humpty Dumpty or Frick’s trip to the future with an average (but meditative) young woman named Pearl who is most curious about love.

 I showed her New York. Shed say, “But why do the people hurry so? Is it really necessary for all those automobiles to keep going and coming? Do the people like to live in layers? If the United States is as big as you say it is, why do you build such high buildings? What is your reason for having so few people rich, so many people poor?” It was like that. And endless. 




   “Night”
by John W. Campbell, Jr. (as by Don A. Stuart)
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1935

Bob Carter takes a plane up to 45,000 feet to test an anti-gravity device, but instead it hurls him into the same future as the story “Twilight”—but whereas the earlier story had mankind who were dying out in 7,000,000 A.D. because of the ubiquity of machines, Carter finds himself billions of years beyond that, with both man and (most) machines long gone.

 Ah, yes, you have a mathematical means of expression, but no understanding of that time, so it is useless. But the last of humanity was allowed to end before the Sun changed from the original G-O stage—a very, very long time ago. 


The story also appeared in Phil Stong’s 1941 anthology, The Other Worlds.   “The Fourth-Dimensional Demonstrator”
by Murray Leinster
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1935

Pete Davidson has inherited all the properties of an uncle who had been an authority on the fourth dimension, including the Fourth-Dimensional Demonstrator that can pull copies of matches, coins, dollar bills, fiancées and kangaroos out of the past.

 Its produced another burnt match. Dragged it forward out of the past, sir. There was a burnt match at that spot, until the glass plate moved a few seconds ago. Like the girl and the banana peel, sir. The machine went back to the place where the match had been, and then it went back in time to where the match was, and then it brought it forward. 


   “Human Machines”
by J. Harvey Haggard
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1935

When the megalomanic and utopia-builder Lan Darth is opposed by Therm Sutner, Darth throws Sutner into a horrid future world that is populated by strange creatures that arose out of Darth’s eugenic and policies that banned sexual reproduction.

Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The 32nd of May” by Paul Ernst, Astounding, Apr 1935 [parallel universes ]

“The Fourth-Dimensional Demonstrator” by Murray Leinster, Astounding, Dec 1935 [despite title, no time travel ]



   “The Shadow Out of Time”
by H.P. Lovecraft
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1936

During an economics lecture, Professor Nathaniel Wingate Peaslee’s body and mind are taken over by a being who can travel to any time and place of his choice, and during the next five years the being studies us, all of which Peaslee pieces together after his return.

Lovecraft scholar S.T. Joshi says that Lovecraft saw the movie Berkeley Square four times in 1933, and “its portrayal of a man of the 20th century who somehow merges his personality with that of is 18th-century ancestor” served as Lovecraft’s inspiration for this story.

 The projected mind, in the body of the organism of the future, would then pose as a member of the race whose outward form it wore, learning as quickly as possible all that could be learned of the chosen age and its massed information and techniques. 


   “The Time Entity”
by Otto Binder (as by Eando Binder)
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1936

John Dakin considers paradoxes as he communicates by radio with his future descendant.

   “Tryst in Time”
by C.L. Moore
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1936

Bold and bored soldier-of-fortune Eric Rosner meets a scientist who sends him skipping through time, always meeting the same beguiling girl with the smoke-blue eyes.

 I can transport you into the past, and you can create events there which never took place in the past we know—but the events are not new. They were ordained from the beginning, if you took that particular path. You are simply embarking upon a different path into a different future, a fixed and preordained future, yet one which will be strange to you because it lies outside your own layer of experience. So you have infinite freedom in all your actions, yet everything you can possibly do is already fixed in time. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Pre-Vision” by John Pierce, Astounding, Mar 1936 [visions of possible futures ]



   The Sands of Time Stories
by P. Schuyler Miller
First story: Astounding, Apr 1937

Terry Donovan realizes that it’s possible to travel through time in 60,000,000-year increments, so naturally he travels back to the time of dinosaurs and visiting aliens.

The first story, “The Sands of Time,” was under Tremaine’s Astounding editorship (Apr 1937) but the sequel, “Coils of Time,” appeared under Campbell’s (May 1939).

 Incidentally, I have forgotten the most important thing of all. Remember that Donovans dominating idea was to prove to me, and to the world, that he had been in the Cretaceous and hobnobbed with its flora and fauna. He was a physicist by inclination, and had the physicists flair for ingenious proofs. Before leaving, he loaded a lead cube with three quartz quills of pure radium chloride that he had been using in a previous experiment, and locked the whole thing up in a steel box. 




   “Forgetfulness”
by John W. Campbell, Jr. (as by Don A. Stuart)
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1937

Millions of years after mankind raised various species and sent them to the stars, one of the species returns and believes that humans have fallen into a primitive existence. And the time travel? Partway through the story, there’s a power source that goes to the end of time and cycles back to the beginning of time. In addition, Fred Galvin pointed out to me that even though it takes the aliens six years to travel to Earth, when they return to their home planet, only one year has passed, apparently a complete undoing by Seun of Rhth of the alien invasion.

The story also appeared in Healy and McComas’s seminal anthology, Adventures in Time and Space, and it was made into a one-act play in 1943 by Wayne Gordon.

 In the first revolution it made, the first day it was built, it circled to the ultimate end of time and the universe, and back to the day it was built. 


The story later appeared in this 1953 anthology.

   “Reverse Phylogeny”
by Amelia Reynolds Long
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1937

Eric Dale once again tells of an escapade of his friend, Professor Aloysius O’Flannigan—this time it’s about his quest to prove or disprove the existance of Atlantis via hypnosis and the recovery of ancestral memories. You’ll need to wait until the end for the tiny bit of time travel to be cast out.

 There are times, I reflected, when nothing else in the English language is so expressive as the single word, “Nuts.” But I said nothing, hoping that he would work off his enthusiasm by writing a letter to the magazine. I should have known better. 


   “Seeker of To-Morrow”
by Eric Frank Russell and Leslie J. Johnson
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1937

Explorer Urnas Karin and his crew of twenty return to Venus from abandoned Earth along with the body of a man who appears to have traveled from the ancient past—and then they revive him, whereupon he tells of his invention of time travel (to the future only) and subsequent journey from 1998 to the present day.

 I had set up my laboratory in the wilds of the Peak District in Derbyshire, in England, where work could be carried on with the minimum of interference. From this laboratory I had dispatched into the unknown, presumably the future, a multitude of objects, including several live creatures such as rats, mice, pigeons and domestic fowl. In no case could I bring back anything I had made to vanish. Once gone, the subject was gone forever. There was no way of discovering exactly where it had gone. There was nothing but to take a risk and go myself. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Isolinguals” by L. Sprague de Camp, Astounding Sep 1937 [ancestral memory ]

“Past, Present and Future” by Nat Schachner, Astounding, Sep 1937 [long sleep ]
aka part of The Three Musketeers of Tomorrow

“City of the Rocket Horde” by Nat Schachner, Astounding, Dec 1937 [long sleep ]
aka part of The Three Musketeers of Tomorrow



   The Legion of Time
by Jack Williamson
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, May-Jul 1938

After two beautiful women of two different possible futures appear to physicist Denny Lanning, he finds himself swept up by a time-traveling ship, the Chronion, along with a band of fighting men who swear their allegiance to The Legion of Time and its mission to ensure that the eviler of the two beautiful women never comes to pass.

 But Max Planck with the quantum theory, de Broglie and Schroedinger with the wave mechanics, Heisenberg with matrix mechanics, enourmously complicated the structure of the universe—and with it the problem of Time.
With the substitution of waves of probability for concrete particles, the world lines of objects are no longer the fixed and simple paths they once were. Geodesics have an infinite proliferation of possible branches, at the whim of sub-atomic indeterminism.
Still, of course, in large masses the statistical results of the new physics are not much different from those given by the classical laws. But there is a fundamental difference. The apparent reality of the universe is the same—but it rests upon a quicksand of possible change.
 


Part I of Asimov’s autobiography

   “Cosmic Corkscrew”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: written in 1938, but unpublished

“Cosmic Corkscrew” was the first story that Asimov ever wrote for submission to the pulp magazines of the day. In the first part of his autobiography, he describes starting the story, setting it aside, and returning to it some thirteen months later. It was the story that he took with him on his first visit to John Campbell, inquiring about why the July 1938 Astounding was late arriving. Alas, the story was rejected and then lost, but it did have time travel!

 In it, I viewed time as a helix (this is, as something like a bedspring). Someone could cut across from one turn directly to the next, thus moving into the future by some exact interval, but being incapable of traveling one day less into the future. (I didnt know the term at the time, but what I had done was to “quantize” time travel.) 

In Memory Yet Green, Part I of Asimov’s autobiography


Isaac Asimov, Master Traveller

Even though Asimov’s first story was lost, I find it comforting that the story was about time travel, a theme that he returned to over-and-over again with far more variety than any of his other themes. My favorite Asimov story, given to me by my Grandpa Main in its original 1958 issue of Galaxy will always be “The Ugly Little Boy.”





   Language for Time Travelers
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1938

This essay convinced me to add at least a few nonfiction works to my list. After all, why not? De Camp interleaves a few fictional vignettes with thoughts on how language might change over the next few centuries. For me, it shows how well the time travel paradigm had been established by 1939.

As a bonus, this essay appeared in the very issue of Astounding that has the final installment of The Legion of Time and which caused all the trouble in my story “Saving Astounding.”

 Wah lenksh? Inksh lenksh, coss. Wah you speak? Said, sah-y, daw geh-ih. Daw, neitha. You fresh? Jumm? 


L. Sprague de Camp, Master Traveller

Even before de Camp produced the award winning Lest Darkness Fall, my Grandpa Main had identified him as a Master Traveller based on “Language for Time Travelers,” which was the first of many de Camp essays. Appropriately enough, de Camp’s enjoyable autobiography is titled Time and Chance.



Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Island of the Individualists” by Nat Schachner, Astounding, May 1938 [long sleep ]

“The Dangerous Dimension” by L. Ron Hubbard, Astounding, Jul 1938 [just teleportation ]

Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“City of the Cosmic Rays” by Nat Schachner, Astounding, Jul 1939 [long sleep ]

“Greater Than Gods” by C.L. Moore, Astounding, Jul 1939 [visions of possible futures ]

“Lightship, Ho!” by Nelson S. Bond, Astounding, Jul 1939 [FTL ]

“City of the Corporate Mind” by Nat Schachner, Astounding, Dec 1939 [long sleep ]



   “Bombardment in Reverse”
by Norman L. Knight
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1940

Jamie Todd Rubin wrote about this story as part of his Vacation in the Golden Age, and I got a pdf copy on Thanksgiving Day in 2012. The story tells of two alien nations at war—a somewhat amateurish was by Martian or Terrestrial standards, but one in which time-traveling weapons target where the enemy was in the past.

 The Nyandrians are attacking Strofander with shells which traverse not only space, but time as well. 




   “Hindsight”
by Jack Williamson
First publication: Astounding, May 1940

Years ago, engineer Bill Webster abandoned Earth for the employ of the piratical Astrarch; now the Astrarch is aiming the final blow at a defeated Earth, and Bill wonders whether the gunsites that he invented can site—and change!—events in the past.

 He didnt like to be called the Renegade. 


   “The Mosaic”
by J.B. Ryan
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1940

Emir Ismail (a soldier and scientist in a Muslim-led 20th century) travels back to the crucial Battle of Tours in 732 A.D.

This is the first story that I read via electronic interlibrary loan with the help of the University of Colorado librarians.

 History is built event by incident—and each is a brick in its structure. If one small piece should slip— 

—John W. Campbell’s introductory blurb for the story




   “Sunspot Purge”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Astounding, Nov 1940

“Read the News Before It Happens!” That’s the slogan that reporter Mike Hamilton proposes when the Globe buys a time machine. But when Mike goes onto the future beat, it’s more than just the stock market and the Minnesota-Wisconsin football game that he runs into—it’s the world of 2450 with only scattered population.

 Think of the opportunities a time machine offers a newspaper. The other papers can tell them what has happened and what is happening, but, by Godrey, theyll have to read the Globe to know what is going to happen. 


   “The Mechanical Mice”
by Eric Frank Russell
First publication: Astounding, Jan 1941 (as by Maurice G. Hugi)

Slightly mad scientist Burman invents a time machine that lets him see the future, from whence he brings back other inventions including a swarm of reproducing mechanical beasties.

 I pinched the idea. What makes it madder is that I wasnt quite sure of what I was stealing, and, crazier still, I dont know from whence I stole it. 




   “The Best-Laid Scheme”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1941

I like the verb that de Camp coined for forward time travel—vanwinkling—but when the hero, De Witt, chases Hedges back in time, they start changing things and everyone (including them) remembers both the old time and the new. It’s beyond me to grok that form of time travel, but I give credit for creativity.

 The problem of backward-jumping has not hitherto been solved. It involves an obvious paradox. If I go back and slay my own grandfather, what becomes of me? 


   “Poker Face”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Astounding, Mar 1941

The accountant, Mr. Face, joins the poker game and, among other things, has the remarkable ability to rig any deal without even touching the cards—what else would you expect for a man who’s traveled some 30,000 years from the future?

 “Now spill it. Just where did you come from?”
   “Geographically,” said Face, “not very far from here. Chronologically, a hell of a long way.”
 


   “Not the First”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding, Apr 1941

As Earth’s first starship passes the light-speed barrier, strange things happen to its acceleration—and to the passage of time.

 Still, it was odd that the lighting system should have gone on the blink on this first ‘night’ of this first trip of the first spaceship powered by the new, stupendous atomic drive. 


   “Time Wants a Skeleton”
by Ross Rocklynne
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1941

After seeing a skeleton with a well-known ring on its finger, a spaceship is thrown back in time and the crew believes that one of them is fated to become that skeleton. This is an early story that addresses the question of whether something known about the future must become true.

 He could feel the supple firmness of her body even through the folds of her undistended pressure suit. 


The story also appeared in this 2000 collection.   “The Probable Man”
by Alfred Bester
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1941

Years before The Demolished Man, there was Bester’s probable man. I looked forward to reading it as the first story of my retirement, and I enjoyed the time-travel model that Bester set up: David Conn travels backward from 2941 to World War II, but then returns to a vastly changed future. For me, though, I found the naïve attitude toward war unappealing.

 Shed be Hilda Pietjen, daughter of the prime minister, just another chip in the Nazi poker game. And hed be dead in a bunker, a thousand years before hed been born. 






   The Weapon Shop Stories
by A.E. van Vogt
First story: Astounding, Jul 1941

Time travel plays only a small role in Van Vogt’s three stories and a serial. The stories follow the immortal founder of The Weapon Shops, an organization that puts science to work to ensure that the common man is never dominated by government or corporations. Along the way, a 20th century man becomes a time-travel pawn, a young man seven millennia in the future takes advantage of a much shorter time-travel escapade, and you’ll spot at least one other time-travel moment.

All the stories were fixed up into two books, The Weapon Shops of Isher and The Weapon Makers, and the SFBC gathered both those into The Empire of Isher.
  1. The Seesaw (Jul 1941) Astounding
  2. The Weapon Shops (Dec 1942) Astounding
  3. The Weapon Makers (Feb-Apr 1943) Astounding
  4. The Weapon Shops of Isher (Feb 1949) Thrilling Wonder Stories

 What did happen to McAllister from the instant that he found the door of the gunshop unlocked? 




   “Backlash”
by Jack Williamson
First publication: Astounding, Aug 1941

Although it doesn’t involve Hitler by name, this story may be the start of the Use-a-Time-Machine-to-Kill-Hitler subgenre.

 With the new tri-polar units I can deflect the projection field back through time. Thats where Im going to attack Levin—in his vulnerable past. 


The story also appears in the 1953 collection Assignment in Eternity, including this copy which I bought at Heathrow while waiting for my mother to arrive for my wedding.

   “Elsewhere”
aka “Elsewhen”
by Robert A. Heinlein (as by Caleb Saunders)
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1941

Professor Arthur Frost has a small but willing class of students who explore elsewhere and elsewhen.

 Most people think of time as a track that they run on from birth to death as inexorably as a train follows its rails—they feel instinctively that time follows a straight line, the past lying behind, the future lying in front. Now I have reason to believe—to know—that time is analogous to a surface rather than a line, and a rolling hilly surface at that. Think of this track we follow over the surface of time as a winding road cut through hills. Every little way the road branches and the branches follow side canyons. At these branches the crucial decisions of your life take place. You can turn right or left into entirely different futures. Occasionally there is a switchback where one can scramble up or down a bank and skip over a few thousand or million years—if you dont have your eyes so fixed on the road that you miss the short cut. 


Asimov’s “Nightfall” also appeared in this issue.   “Short-Circuited Probability”
by Norman L. Knight
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1941

Our hero, Mark Livingston, finds a dead human body that is older than the human race—but still quite clearly his own body along with a highly evolved traveling companion.

 This is a story of something that did—or didnt—happen. Question is, can it be properly said that it did or did not? 

—Campbell’s introduction to the story




   “By His Bootstraps”
by Robert A. Heinlein (as by Anson MacDonald)
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1941

Bob Wilson, Ph.D. student, throws himself 30,000 years into the future, where he tries to figure out what began this whole adventure.

Evan Zweifel gave me a copy of this magazine as a present!

 Wait a minute now—he was under no compulsion. He was sure of that. Everything he did and said was the result of his own free will. Even if he didnt remember the script, there were some things that he knew “Joe” hadnt said. “Mary had a little lamb,” for example. He would recite a nursery rhyme and get off this damned repetitive treadmill. He opened his mouth— 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“—And He Built a Crooked House” by Robert A. Heinlein, Astounding, Feb 1941 [4D spacial topology ]



   “Recruiting Station”
aka Masters of Time, aka Earth’s Last Fortress
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding, Mar 1942

When the Glorious begin shanghaiing military recruits throughout time, Miss Norma Matheson and her once-and-future boyfriend Jack Garson are caught up in 18 versions of our solar system and a Glorious-vs-Planetarians war.

 We are masters of time. We live at the farthest frontier of time itself, and all the ages belong to us. No words could begin to describe the vastness of our empire or the futility of opposing us. 


   “Some Curious Effects of Time Travel”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding, Apr 1942

The very first Probability Zero story in Astounding took us on a romp back in time by the members of the Drinkwhiskey Institute to obtain saleable specimens of Pleistocene fauna, we learn that time travel has an effect on aging (coincidentally, the same effect described by Gaspar in Chapter 9 of El Anacronópete).

 A curious feature of time travel back from the present is that one gets younger and younger, becoming successively a youth, a child, an embryo and finally nothing at all. 




   “Time Pussy”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Astounding, Apr 1942 (as by George E. Dale)

Mr. Mac tells of the troubles of trying to preserve the body of a four-dimensional cat.

 ‘Four-dimensional, Mr. Mac? But the fourth dimension is time. I had learned that the year before, in the third grade. 


This issue also contains Asimov’s first Foundation story.   “Forever Is Not So Long”
by F. Anton Reeds
First publication: Astounding, May 1942

The professor’s handsome assistant, Stephen Darville, is in love with the professor’s beautiful daughter and wants to spend every waking moment with her, but duty calls—duty to build a time machine, of course, in which the youthful assistant can go ten years into the future to return with the more polished time machines that will be produced by the professor’s very own technicians over the next ten years.

 The technicians would “save” themselves ten years of labor and the new sweeping highway in the future and the past would be open to mankind within the life of its discoverer. 


The story also appears in Groff Conklin’s 1952 anthology, The Omnibus of Science Fiction.   “Heritage”
by Robert Abernathy
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1942

Nick Doody, inventor of the time machine and sole explorer through time, ventures some nine millennia beyond what he reckons was the fall of mankind.

 Are you not a Man, and do not Men know everything? But I am only a . . . 


The story also appeared in this 1975 collection.   “My Name Is Legion”
by Lester del Rey
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1942

At the end of World War II, as the Allies occupation army closes in on Hitler, a man offers him a way to bring back thousands of copies of himself from the future.

 Years ago in one of those American magazines, there was a story of a man who saw himself. He came through a woods somewhere and stumbled on a machine, got in, and it took him three days back in time. Then, he lived forward again, saw himself get in the machine and go back. 


Lester del Rey, Master Traveller

For me, the scope of “My Name Is Legion” might well have garnered del Rey a Master Traveller Citation, but the actual award came when his 1966 juvenile novel, Tunnel Through Time, brought adventure time travel to young readers.





   “Time Dredge”
by Robert Arthur, Jr.
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1942

I haven’t yet read this story which appeared only in Astounding, but Jamie Todd Rubin writes that the story is of two men who seek a German professor who plans to pull things out of ancient South America to help the Germany win World War II.

 The German professor had a nice idea for making archeology a branch of Blitzkrieg technique—with the aid of a little tinkering with Time. 

—John W. Campbell’s introduction to the story


The story also appeared in this 2003 collection.   “Secret Unattainable”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1942

After his brother is killed by the Nazis, Herr Professor Johann Kenrube invents a machine that promises a little of everything to Hitler—unlimited energy and natural resources, instant transportation behind enemy lines, even a smidgden of time travel—but only after the Germans have over-committed themselves, does the truth about the machine emerge.

 Kenrube was at Gribe Schloss before two P.M., March 21st. This completely nullifies the six P.M. story. Place these scoundrels under arrest, and bring them before me at eight oclock tonight. 

—comment on a memo from Himmler


   “About Quarrels, about the Past”
by John Pierce
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1942

In addition to A.E. van Vogt’s “Secret Unattainable,” the July 1942 Astounding also had three short, short time travel stories as part of the magazine’s Probability Zero series. In this story, our narrator tells of the quirky Quarrels who took his time machine into the past—or we should say some past—to woo the winsome Nephertiti.

 Well, didnt you realize that this uncertainty holds for the past, too? I hadnt until Quarrels pointed it out. All we have is a lot of incomplete data. Is it just because were stupid? Not at all. We cant find a unique wave function. 


Some other flag covers from July 1942

   “The Strange Case of
the Missing Hero”

by Frank Holby
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1942

Many magazines across the U.S. featured a flag on the cover in this patriotic month. In this second Probability Zero story of the issue, Elliot Gallant, hero to the people and beacon light of courage, was the first man to travel through time; Sebastian Lelong, editor of the Encyclopedia Galactica, aims to find out why he never returned.

This is the earliest story that I’ve spotted anywhere with the time traveler coming to know his own mother.

 Elliot Gallant went back into time thirty years. He liked the peaceful days of yesteryear. He married, had a son. 


Interior artwork for the Probability Zero series   “That Mysterious Bomb Raid”
by Bob Tucker
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1942

Sitting around Hinkle’s, the narrator tells the story of how he, Hinkle and the local university scientist took a bomb back in time in an attempt to nip World War II in the bud.

 Well, sir, that little machine traveled so fast that before we could stop it we found ourselves in the last century. Somewhere in the 1890s. We were going to drop our oil drip there but I happened to remember that my grandfather was spending his honeymoon in Tokyo sometime during that decade— 


   “Time Marches On”
by Ted Carnell
First publication: Astounding, Aug 1942

Also appearing in the first ever Probability Zero column (along with de Camp’s story, listed above, and a story by Malcolm Jameson) is Carnell’s tale of a group of science fiction authors who explore the consequences of a simple time machine that can be built from radio parts, but can take the traveler only into the future.

 Yes, they were practically all here, thought Doc Smith, as his gaze moved from one to another of the circle. Williamson, Miller, Hubbard, Bond, McClary, Rocklynne, Heinlein and MacDonald, and many others who had once written about the mysteries of time travel—so many hundreds of years ago now. 


   “The Barrier”
aka “Barrier”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1942

John Brent travels 500 years into the future only to find that he can’t return because the authoritarian state has erected barriers to change that include regularization of all verbs and temporal barriers that prevent backward time travel.

Fred Galvin mentioned to me that this story has the earliest mention that he remembers of the Where are all the time travelers? question, but we are still looking for any earlier reference.

 Stephen frowned. “Before failure of Barrier, we often wondered why we never seed time travelers. We doubted Charnwoods Law and yet—We decided there beed only two explanations. Either time travel bees impossible, or time travelers cannot be seed or intervene in time they visit.” 


The story also appeared in Healy and McComas’s famous 1946 anthology, Adventures in Time and Space.

   “The Twonky”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1942

A dazed man (apparently dazed from running into a temporal snag) appears in a radio factory, whereupon (before returning to his own time) he makes a radio that’s actually a twonky which gets shipped to a Mr. Kerry Westerfield, who is initially quite confounded and amazed at all it can do.

Because of the opening, I’m convinced that this twonky is from the future, but the origin of the twonky in Archg Oboler’s 1953 movie is less certain.

 “Great Snell!” he gasped. “So that was it! I ran into a temporal snag!” 


Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, Master Travellers

Kuttner and Moore hold the distinction of being the recipients of the only joint Master Travellers award. It’s hard to pick which is their most unforgetable story: “The Twonky”? “Mimsy...”? “Vintage Season”? Nope. I’m nominating the lesser known “What You Need”!



   The Anachron Stories
by Malcolm Jameson
First story: Astounding, Oct 1942

Golden-age favorite Malcolm Jameson wrote three stories of Anachron, Inc., a company that recruits ex-commandos for their “foreign” department—a euphemism for intertemporal commerce.
  1. Anachron, Inc. (Oct 1942) Astounding
  2. Barrius, Imp. (Jan 1943) Astounding
  3. When Is When? (Aug 1943) Astounding

 We can use a limited number of agents for our “foreign” department, but they must be wiry, active, of unusually sound constitution, and familiar with the use of all types of weapons. They MUST be resourceful, of quick decision, tact and of proven courage, as they may be called upon to work in difficult and dangerous situations without guidance or supervision. Previous experience in purchasing or sales work desirable but not necessary. EX-COMMANDO MEN usually do well with us. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Push of a Finger” by Alfred Bester, Astounding, May 1942 [predictions ]

A translation appeard in the all-Boucher issue of Urania (10 Feb 1991). Strangely enough, “snulbug” translates as “snulbug” in Italian; however “Elsewhen” is “Viaggio nel tempo.”

   “Elsewhen”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding, Jan 1943

Private detective Fergus O’Breen investigates Harrison Patrigde, inventor and ne’er-do-well, who accidentally invents a short-range time machine, causing him to envision how the world (and the lovely Faith Preston) will admire him if only he can get enough money to build a bigger version (perhaps via a murder with the time machine providing an alibi).

 Time can pass quickly when you are absorbed in your work, but not so quickly as all that. Mr. Partridge looked at his pocket watch. It said nine thirty-one. Suddely, in the space of seconds, the best chronometer available had gained forty-two minutes. 




   “The Search”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding, Jan 1943

When salesman Ralph Carson Drake tries to recover his missing memory of the past two weeks, he discovers that he had interactions with a woman named Selanie Johns who sold remarkable futuristic devices for one dollar, her father, and an old gray-eyed, man who is feared by Selanie and her father.

Van Vogt combined this with two other stories and a little fix-up material for his 1970 publication of Quest for the Future.

 “Just grab his right shoulder with that glove, from behind,” SpockPrice was saying. “Press below the collarbone with the points of your fingers, press hard.” 


The story also appeared in this 1952 collection.   “Time Locker”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Jan 1943

Once again, drunken genius Gallegher invents something without knowing that he has done so’this time, a box that swallows things up until they reappear at now + x.

 He was, Vanning reflected, an odd duck. Galloway was essentially amoral, thoroughly out of place in this too-complicated world. He seemed to watch, with a certain wry amusement, from a vantage point of his own, rather disinterested for the most part. And he made things— 




   “Mimsy Were the Borogoves”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1943

A scientist in the far future sends back two boxes of educational toys to test his time machine. One is discovered by Charles Dodgson’s niece in the 19th century, and the other by two children in 1942.

This story was in the first book that I got from the SF Book Club in the summer of 1970, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume 1 (edited by Robert Silverberg). I read and reread those stories until the book fell apart.

 Neither Paradine nor Jane guessed how much of an effect the contents of the time machine were having on the kids. 


   “Sanctuary”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1943

Mr. Holding, an American poet in Vichy France before the U.S. came into the war, visits an American scientist who is trying to stay neutral as he builds his time machine.

 I am, sir, a citizen of the world of science. 




   “Endowment Policy”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Aug 1943

A futuristic old man asks the taxi dispatcher for Denny Holt’s cab by name. When the man gets in the cab, he offers Denny $1000 to protect him from pursuit for the night and to steal a brown notebook with a secret formula for the War Department.

 Now, shielding the bills with his body, he took them out for a closer examination. They looked all right. They werent counterfeit; the serial numbers were O.K.; and they had the same odd musty smell Holt had noticed before.
“You must have been hoarding these,” he hazarded.
Smith said absently, “Theyve been on exhibit for sixty years—” He caught himself and drank rye.
 


   “Paradox Lost”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1943

During a philosophy lecture, the left hand of bored college student Shorty McCabe disappears, at which point Shorty figures he may as well follow whereever the hand went, which turns out to be into a time machine invented by the only kind of person who could invent such a thing—a crazy man.

 But a time machine is impossible. It is a paradox. Your professors will explain that a time machine cannot be, because it would mean that two things could occupy the same space at the same time. And a man could go back and kill himself when he was younger, and—oh, all sorts of stuff like that. Its completely impossible. Only a crazy man could— 




   “As Never Was”
by P. Schuyler Miller
First publication: Astounding, Jan 1944

One of the first inexplicable finds by archealogists traveling to the future is the blue knife made of no known material brought back by Walter Toynbee who promptly dies, leaving it to his grandson to explain the origin of the knife.

 I knew grandfather. He would go as far as his machine could take him. I had duplicated that. He would look around him for a promising site, get out his tools, and pitch in. Well, I could do that, too. 


The story also appeared in August Derleth’s 1948 anthology, Strange Ports of Call.

   “Far Centaurus”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding, Jan 1944

Four men set out for Alpha Centauri on a 500-year journey where each will awaken only a handful of times. That’s not time travel, of course, but be patient and you will run into real time travel.

Van Vogt combined this with two other stories and some fix-up material (especially for “Far Centaurus”) for his 1970 publication of Quest for the Future.

 Were here! Its over, the long night, the incredible journey. Well all be waking, seeing each other, as well as the civilization out there. Seeing, too, the great Centauri suns. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Yehudi Principle” by Fredric Brown, Astounding, May 1944 [predictions ]

   “What You Need”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1945

Reporter Tim Carmichael visits Peter Talley, a shopkeeper on Park Avenue who provides for a select clientele things that they will need in the future.

I never include prescience stories in my list, but like Heinlein’s “Life-Line,” this one is an exception, both because of its tone and because it was made into episodes of both Tales of Tomorrow (the tv show) and The Twilight Zone.

   




   “The Chronokinesis
of Jonathan Hull”

by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1946

Private Eye Fergus O’Breen is back for his third and final encounter with time travel, this time with a time traveler who shows up dead in his room one day and is alive and walking in a stilted manner the next. In the process of explaining himself, the traveler also displays knowledge of Boucher’s traveler in “Barrier” and also of Breen’s other time travel encounters.

 And now, I realize, Mr. OBreen, why I was inclined to trust you the moment I saw yoiur card. It was through a fortunately preserved letter of your sisters, which found its way into our archives, that we knew of the early fiasco of Harrison Partridge and your part therein. We knew, too, of the researches of Dr. Derringer, and how he gave up in despair after his time traveler failed to return, having encountered who knows what unimaginable future barrier. 




   “Film Library”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1946

Each time a film goes through Peter Caxton’s projector at Tichenor Collegiate, it gets replaced with a different film from the future.

Van Vogt combined this with two other stories and a little fix-up material for his 1970 publication of Quest for the Future.

 Not that he would necessarily have suspected anyway that he had come into possession of films that had been made more than fifty years in the future. 


The story also appeared in this 1982 collection.   “Blind Time”
by George O. Smith
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1946

Oak Tool Works has developed a handy time treatment whereby a portion of any tool can be sent into the future for a limited time, but its movements during that time must exactly mirror the movements of the rest of the tool during the current time. Peter Wright is the insurance adjuster who must examine an accident that the treatment is going to cause at 8pm.

 There is that element of wonder, too, you know. Every man in the place knows that someone is going to get clipped with that crane. 




   “Vintage Season”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1946

More and more strange people are appearing each day in and around Oliver Wilson’s home; the explanation from the euphoric redhead leads him to believe they are time travelers gathering for an important event.

 Looking backward later, Oliver thought that in that moment, for the first time clearly, he began to suspect the truth. But he had no time to ponder it, for after the brief instant of enmity the three people from—elsewhere—began to speak all at once, as if in a belated attempt to cover something they did not want noticed. 




   “Child’s Play”
by William Tenn
First publication: Astounding, Mar 1947

Sam Weber, an underemployed lawyer, receives a Bild-a-Man kit as a Christmas gift from 400 years in the future—and it’s a timely gift, too, seeing as how he could use a replacement girlfriend.

 Bild-a-Man Set #3. This set is intended solely for the use of children, between the ages of eleven and thirteen. The equipment, much more advanced that Bild-a-Man Sets 1 and 2, will enable the child of this age-group to build and assemble complete adult humans in perfect working order. 




   “Time and Time Again”
by H. Beam Piper
First publication: Astounding, Apr 1947

At 43 years old, Allan Hartley is caught in a flash-bomb at the Battle of Buffalo, only to wake up in his own 13-year-old body on the day before Hiroshima.

Piper’s first short story impacted me because I fantasize about the same thing (perhaps we all do). What would you do? Who would you tell? What would you try to change? What would you fear changing?

 Here; if you can remember the next thirty years, suppose you tell me when the War’s going to end. This one, I mean. 


   “Errand Boy”
by William Tenn
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1947

When invention mogul Malcolm Blyn spots an unusual can of paint that a young boy brings to his factory, he begins to wonder whether it came from the future and what else the future may hold.

 I hand him an empty can and say I want it filled with green paint—it should have orange polka dots. 


   “The Figure”
by Edward Grendon
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1947

The narrator, along with his pals Dettner and Lasker, are frantically working on a machine that can bring something back from the future before they’re all called away by the army to work on some cockroach problem.

I enjoy stories with some personal connection to myself (and generally award an extra half star). In this case, the connection is Alfred Tarski, the Polish logician who was the advisor of the advisor of my own academic advisor, David B. Benson.

 Lasker is a mathematician. He specializes in symbolic logic and is the only man I know who can really understand Tarski. 


   “Meddler’s Moon”
by George O. Smith
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1947

Joseph Hedgerly travels back in time some 60 years to ensure that his grandfather marries the right woman.

 Either we live by accident and die by accident, or we live by plan and die by plan. If our lives are written in the Book of Acts, then no effort is worth the candle. For there will be those who will eternally strive to be good and yet shall fail. There will be others who care not nor strive not and yet will thrive. Why? Only because it is so written. And by whom? By the omnipotent God. Who, my friends, has then written into our lives both the good and the evil that we do ourselves! He moves us as pawns, directs us to strive against odds, yet knows that we must fail, because he planned it that way. 






   The Thiotimoline Stories
by Isaac Asimov
First story: Astounding, Mar 1948

I don’t know if this is time travel or not, but it certainly violates causality when the time for thiotimoline to dissolve in water is minus 1.12 seconds.
  1. The Endochronic Properties of Resublimated Thiotimoline (Mar 1948) Astounding
  2. The Micropsychiatric Properties of Thiotimoline (Dec 1953) Astounding
  3. Thiotimoline and the Space Age (Oct 1960) Analog
  4. Thiotimoline to the Stars (Nov 1973) Analog
  5. Antithiotimoline (Dec 1977) Analog

 Mr. Asimov, tell us something about the thermodynamic properties of the compound thiotimoline. 

—Professor Ralph S. Halford to Asimov at the conclusion of his Ph.D. oral exam on May 20, 1948.


   “Time Trap”
by Charles L. Harness
First publication: Astounding, Aug 1948

The story presents a fixed series of events, which includes a man disappearing at one point in the future and (from his point of view) reappearing at the start of the story to then interact with himself, his own wife, and the evil alien.

It’s nice that there’s no talk of the universe exploding when he meets himself, but even so, the story suffers from a murkiness that is often part of time-travel stories that are otherwise enjoyable. The murkiness stems from two points: (1) That somehow the events are repeating over and over again—but from whose viewpoint? (2) The events are deterministic and must be acted out exactly the same each time. I enjoy clever stories that espouse the viewpoint of the second item (“By His Bootstraps”). But this does not play well with the first item, and (as with many stories), Harness did not address that conflict nor the consequent issue of free will. Still, I enjoyed the story and wish I’d met Harness when I traveled to Penn State University in the spring of 1982.

 But searching down time, Troy-Poole now found only the old combination of Troy and Poole he knew so well. Hundreds, thousands, millions of them, each preceding the other. As far back as he could sense, there was always a Poole hovering over a Troy. Now he would become the next Poole, enmesh the next Troy in the web of time, and go his own way to bloody death. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“He Walked Around the Horses” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Astounding, Apr 1948 [alternate timelines ]

“Police Operation” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Astounding, Jul 1948 [alternate timelines ]



   “The Red Queen’s Race”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jan 1949

By my count, this was Asimov’s third foray into time travel, but his first as Dr. Asimov. In the story, the dead Elmer Tywood also had a Ph.D. and a plan to translate a modern chemistry textbook into Greek before sending it back in time to inaugurate a Golden Age of science long before it actually occurred.

 There was a short silence, then he said: “Ill tell you. Why dont you check with his students?”
I lifted my eyebrows: “You mean in his classes?”
He seemed annoyed: “No, for Heavens sake. His research students! His doctoral candidates!”
 




   “Manna”
by Peter Phillips
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1949

After the Miracle Meal food company builds a canning plant on the site of a 12th century haunted priory, cans of the Manna start discappearing.

 Miracle Meal. Press here. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Time Heals” by Poul Anderson, Astounding, Oct 1949 [long sleep ]



   “The Little Black Bag”
by C.M. Kornbluth
First publication: Astounding, Jul 1950

In a 25th century where the vast majority of people have stunted intelligence (or at least talk with poor grammar), a physicist accidentally sends a medical bag back through time to Dr. Bayard Full, a down-on-his-luck, generally drunk, always callously self-absorbed, dog-kicking shyster. Despite falling in with a guttersnipe of a girl, Annie Aquella, he tries to make good use of the gift.

 Switch is right. It was about time travel. What we call travel through time. So I took the tube numbers he gave me and I put them into the circuit-builder; I set it for ‘series’ and there it is-my time-traveling machine. It travels things through time real good. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
To the Stars by L. Ron Hubbard, Astounding, Feb–Mar 1950 [time dilation ]
aka Return to Tomorrow

“Last Enemy” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Astounding, Aug 1950 [alternate timelines ]

“A Subway Named Mobius” by A.J. Deutsch, Astounding, Dec 1950 [4D spacial topology ]
aka ‘Non-Stop’

   “Fool’s Errand”
by Lester del Rey
First publication: Science Fiction Quarterly, Nov 1951

Roger Sidney, a 23rd-century professor of paraphysics, travels back to ask an aging Nostradamus whether he truly wrote those uncannily accurate predictions that were not found until 1989, but Sidney overshoots his target and ends up searching for a young Nostradamus in a tavern in southern France.

“Fool’s Errand” was the second story del Rey wrote after moving to New York in 1944 where he rented a $3/week room near Ninth Avenue and Fifty-Seventh Street, but Campbell rejected the story for Astounding as being too obvious. It was another seven years before Roger Sidney would find his way into the pages of Science Fiction Quarterly, one of the new spate of 1950s sf magazines.

 If Nostradamus would accept the manuscript as being his, the controversy would be ended, and the paraphysicists could extend their mathematics with sureness that led on toward glorious, breathtaking possibilities. Somewhere, perhaps within a few feet, was the man who could settle the question conclusively, and somehow Sidney must find him—and soon! 


   “The Hunting Season”
by Frank M. Robinson
First publication: Astounding, Nov 1951

For the crime of questioning the State’s hunts in public, huntman David Black is sentenced to become the quarry in a three-day hunt in the past—the 20th century in this case.

My own student, David Black, who died unexpectedly in the summer of 2006, would always talk with me about anything and everything. So if he were still alive as I read this (in 2015), we would have a happy afternoon reading it and talking about the social situation the story brings up, or maybe we’d figure out why I’m so attracted to one-against-the-system stories.

 Youre much better off than if we had held the hunt in Sixteenth Century Spain during the inquisition or perhaps ancient Rome during the reign of Caligula. You may even like it here during the brief period of the hunt. Its a fairly civilized culture, at least in a material sense. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Temple Trouble” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Astounding, Apr 1951 [alternate timelines ]

   “The Entrepreneur”
by Thomas Wilson
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1952

Ivan Smithov, an upstanding U.S. Communist from the year 2125, is charged with making arrangements for a team of three entrepreneurs to visit the U.S. in 1953 to make preparations for a time tourist enterprise—but Ivan runs into problems procuring local currency for the expedition from the Soviet embassy of the time until his companions’ behavior draws enough attention that the ambassador begins to believe him. But what other consequences might their goings-on have?

 Mrat-See turned quickly, wincing at the protest of his aching muscles. The creature standing before him might have issued from a nightmare. Its heavy, barrellike body was slung like a hammock on four bowed legs. The enormous head, with undershot jaw, protruding fangs, and pendulous lips, was turned toward him unswervingly, and the continuing growl was a deep rumble of menace from the massive chest. Mrat-Sees heart leaped with fear. He had seen such creatures before in the Yorkgrad zoo. Dogs they were called. 


   “This Is the Way the World Ends”
by H.W. Johnson
First publication: Astounding, Aug 1954

Living in a world threatened by nuclear extinction, seven-year-old Tommy receives the current and future thoughts of animals and people.

 There isnt going to be anything. Its all black after tomorrow. 


   “The Easy Way”
by Oscar A. Boch
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1954

Hal Thomas’s wife thinks that he doesn’t pay enough attention to his children, one of whom is building an antigravity/time machine upstairs and the other of whom doesn’t need the machine to move through space and time.

 Space-time—is cute? 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Time Crime” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Astounding, Feb 1955 [alternate timelines ]

“The Waitabits” by Eric Frank Russell, Astounding, Jul 1955 [personal time rate differences ]



  
 of the Reggie Rivers Stories

“A Gun for Dinosaur”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Galaxy, Mar 1956

Dinosaur hunters Reggie Rivers (no relation to the Denver Bronco) and his partner, the Raja, organize time-travel safaris in a world with a Hawking-style chronological protection principle.

In 1992, Silverberg asked de Camp to provide one sequel to the by-then classic “A Gun for Dinosaur.’ De Camp complied and used it as a springboard to write seven more stories over the next year. All those stories plus the original Reggie River adventure were published together in the 1993 collection Rivers of Time. After de Camp’s death, Chris Bunch wrote a tenth story as a tribute to the master.

 Oh, Im no four-dimensional thinker; but, as I understand it, if people could go back to a more recent time, their actions would affect our own history, which would be a paradox or contradiction of facts. Cant have that in a well-run universe, you know. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Waitabits” by Eric Frank Russell, Astounding, Jul 1955 [personal time rate differences ]



   “Aristotle and the Gun”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1958

When Sherman Weaver’s time machine project is abruptly canceled, he takes matters into his own hands, visiting Aristotle with the plan to ensure that the philosopher takes the scientific method to heart so strongly that the dark ages will never come and science will progress to a point where it appreciates Sherman’s particular genius.

 Like his colleagues, Aristotle never appreciated the need for constant verification. Thus, though he was married twice, he said that men have more teeth than women. He never thought to ask either of his wives to open her mouth for a count. 








   The Changewar Stories
by Fritz Leiber
First story: Astounding, Mar 1958

Two groups, the Snakes and the Spiders, battle each other for the control of all time. At least one other story (“When the Change-Winds Blow”) has appeared in the Change War collections with no snakes or spiders, but it may be in the Change War universe nonetheless.
  1. Try and Change the Past (Mar 1958) Astounding
  2. The Big Time (Mar and Apr 1958) Galaxy
  3. Damnation Morning (Aug 1959) Fantastic
  4. The Oldest Soldier (May 1960) F&SF
  5. No Great Magic (Dec 1963) Galaxy
  6. When the Change-Winds Blow (Aug 1964) F&SF
  7. Knight’s Move, aka Knight to Move (Dec 1965) Broadside

    These might be Changewar, but with no time travel:
  8. A Deskful of Girls (Apr 1958) F&SF
  9. The Number of the Beast (Dec 1958) Galaxy
  10. The Haunted Future, aka Tranquility, or Else! (Nov 1959)    Fantastic
  11. The Mind Spider (Nov 1959) Fantastic
  12. When the Change-Winds Blow (Aug 1964) F&SF
  13. Black Corridor (Dec 1967) Galaxy

 Change one event in the past and you get a brand new future? Erase the conquests of Alexander by nudging a Neolithic pebble? Extirpate America by pulling up a shoot of Sumerian grain? Brother, that isnt the way it works at all! The space-time continuums built of stubborn stuff and change is anything but a chain-reaction. 

—“Try and Change the Past”




   “Unborn Tomorrow”
by Mack Reynolds
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1959

Private investigator Simon and his assistant Betty are hired by a curious old man to hunt up some time travelers at Oktoberfest. Betty is game, but Simon, sporting a major hangover, is uncharacteristically reticent.

 “Time travel is impossible.”
“Why?”
“Why?”
“Yes, why?”
Betty looked to her boss for assistance. None was forthcoming. There ought to be some very quick, positive, definite answer. She said, “Well, for one thing, paradox. Suppose you had a time machine and traveled back a hundred years or so and killed your own great-grandfather. Then how could you ever be born?”
“Confound it if I know,” the little fellow growled. “How?”
 




   “Gun for Hire”
by Mack Reynolds
First publication: Analog, Dec 1960

Hit man Joe Prantera is transported to the year 2133 to knock off a bad guy since nobody of that time is capable of doing violence.

 Ya think Im stupid? I can see that. 




   “Remember the Alamo!”
by R.R. Fehrenbach
First publication: Analog, Dec 1961

John Ord goes back to observe the Alamo and perhaps to persuade some reluctant defenders that even if the Alamo falls, it’ll nevertheless be the turning point in winning the west.

 “The Alamo, sir.” A slow, steady excitement seemed to burn in the Britainers bright eyes. “Santa Anna wont forget that name, you can be sure. Youll want to talk to the other officers now, sir? About the message we drew up for Sam Houston?” 




   “The Winds of Time”
by James H. Schmitz
First publication: Analog, Sep 1962

Schmitz wrote a popular series of novels and stories about a galactic federation called the Hub. This is the only one of the stories that I’ve read—about Gefty Rammer, the captain of a space freighter that is commissioned by a secretive man named Maulbow who claims to be from a race of future time travelers.

 Also, according to Maulbow, there was a race of the future, human in appearance, with machines to sail the current of time through the universe—to run and tack with the winds of time, dipping in and out of the normspace of distant periods and galaxies as they chose. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Right Time” by John Berryman, Analog, Dec 1963 [precognition ]

Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Gunpowder God” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Analog, Nov 1964 [alternate timelines ]
aka “Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen”

Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Down Styphon!” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Analog, Nov 1965 [alternate timelines ]





  
 in the Dragonriders of Pern Series

Dragonflight
by Anne McCaffrey
First publication: Analog, Oct 1967 (“Weyr Search”) and Dec 1967–Jan 1968 (“Dragonrider”)

By the time that Lessa of Ruatha Hold becomes Weyrwoman of the only remaining dragon weyr, the end of all Pern seems a possibility since a single weyr is not enough to fight off the falling threads from the Red Star.

Allison Thompson-Brown reminded me that dragons can go when as well as where. Mind you, the actual whening part (or going between time, as it’s called) didn’t come until the third installment (Part 2 of “Dragonrider” in the Jan 1968 Analog), but I’ll date the concept back to the slightly earlier appearance of the first story (“Weyr Search” in Oct 1967). The two stories were fixed up into the first Pern novel, Dragonflight, in July of 1968, but it was another ten years before I discovered it.

 “Dragons can go between times as well as places. They go as easily to a when as to a where.”
Robinton’s eyes widened as he digested this astonishing news.
“That is how we forestalled the attack on Nerat yesterday morning. We jumped back two hours
between times to meet the Threads as they fell.” 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Compound Interest” by Christopher Anvil, Analog, Jul 1967 [despite title, no time travel ]

   “The Timesweepers”
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Analog, Aug 1969

I haven’t yet read this short story that Laumer expanded to the novel Dinosaur Beach in 1971, though perhaps some day I will spot the Ballantime paperback, Timetracks, that collected it along with four other stories.

   “Stretch of Time”
by Ruth Berman
First publication: Analog, Oct 1972

Sylvia Fontis at Luna University has built a working time machine—she calls it the Dimensional Revolver—but she’s too scared to use it until Professor Kent comes up with an idea for an experiment.

 So what did you do, bring back the results of the Centauri Probe? Kill your grandmother? 








   Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon Stories
by Spider Robinson
First story: Analog, Feb 1973

At Mike Callahan’s bar, the regulars listen to the tall tales of all time travelers (and others including aliens, vampires, talking dogs, etc.).
  1. The Guy with the Eyes (Feb 1973) Analog
  2. The Time-Traveler (Apr 1974) Analog
  3. The Law of Conservation of Pain (Dec 1974) Analog
  4. Two Heads Are Better Than One (May 1975) Analog
  5. Unnatural Causes (Oct 1975) Analog
  6. A Voice Is Heard in Ramah . . . (Nov 1975) Analog
  7. The Centipede’s Dilemma (1977) in Crosstime Saloon
  8. Just Dessert (1977) in Crosstime Saloon
  9. The Wonderful Conspiracy (1977) in Crosstime Saloon
  10. Dog Day Evening (Oct 1977) Analog
  11. Mirror/rorriM off the Wall (Nov 1977) Analog
  12. Fivesight (Jul 1979) Omni
  13. Have You Heard the One . . .? (Jun 1980) Analog
  14. Pyotr’s Story (12 Oct 1981) Analog
  15. Involuntary Man’s Laughter (Dec 1983) Analog
  16. The Blacksmith’s Tale (Dec 1985) Analog
  17. The Mick of Time (May 1986) Analog
  18. The Paranoid (from Lady) (Winter 1988) in Pulphouse: Issue Two
  19. Callahan’s Lady (1989) 11 connected stories
  20. Lady Slings the Booze (1991) aka Kill the Editor
  21. The Callahan Touch Mary’s Place book
  22. The Immediate Family (Jan 1993) Analog
  23. The End of the Painbow (Jul 1993) Analog
  24. Off the Wall at Callahan’s 1994
  25. Callahan’s Legacy (1996) collection of quotes
  26. Post Toast (circa 1996) USENET group alt.callahans
  27. Callahan’s Key (2000) new novel
  28. Callahan’s Con (2003) new novel
  29. Too Hot Too Hoot (from Legacy) (Oct 2006) in This Is My Funniest

 And as Callahan refilled glasses all around, the time traveler told us his story. 




   “Anniversary Project”
by Joe Haldeman
First publication: Analog, Oct 1975

One million years after the invention of writing, Three-Phasing (nominally male) brings a 20th century man and his wife forward in time to teach the ancestors of man how to read.

 “Pleasta Meetcha, Bob. Likewise, Sarah. Call me, uh . . .“ The only twentieth-century language in which Three-phasings name makes sense is propositional calculus. “ George. George Boole.” 


   The Crisis Stories
by James Gunn
First story: Analog, Mar 1977

Bill Johnson travels from the future to affect important political change at moments of crisis, but each time he makes a change, he also forgets all personal details about himself.
  1. Child of the Sun (Mar 1977) Analog
  2. The End of the World    (Jan 1984) Analog
  3. Man of the Hour (Oct 1984) Analog
  4. Mother of the Year (Apr 1985) Analog
  5. Touch of the Match (Feb 1985) Analog
  6. Will of the Wisp (May 1985) Analog
  7. Crisis! (May 1986) fix-up novel

 But each time you intervene, no matter how subtly, you change the future from which you came. You exist in this time and outside of time and in the future, and so each change makes you forget. 


   “Rotating Cylinders and the Possibility of Global Causality Violation”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Analog, Aug 1977

A mathematician named Quifting has a way to use a time machine to end the war with the Hallane Regency once and for all.

 Did nobody ever finish one of these, ah, time machines? 


   The Orion Series
by Ben Bova
First story: Weird Heroes 8 (Nov 1977)

Orion the Hunter is tasked by mighty Ormazd to continually battle evil Ahriman, the Dark One. Bova’s first tale chronicles a time thousands of years in the past when Orion is part of a nomadic hunting clan that includes the beautiful Ana whom he has bonded with and loved throughout time.
  1. Title Publication
  2. Floodtide (Nov 1977) in Weird Heroes 8
  3. Orion (1984) incorporates “Floodtide”
  4. Vengeance of Orion (1988)
  5. Orion in the Dying Time (1990)
  6. Orion and the Conqueror    (1984)
  7. Orion among the Stars (1995)
  8. Legendary Heroes (Dec 1996) Dragon Magazine
  9. Orion and King Arthur (2012)

 But even from this distance I could see she was the gray-eyed woman I had known in other eras; the woman I had loved, thousands of years in the future of this world. The woman who had loved me. 

—“Floodtide”, reprinted in the March 1983 Analog


   “Stalking the Timelines”
by Kevin O’Donnell, Jr.
First publication: Analog, Sep 1978

A catlike being lives the life of a soldier in many different times and places, but always with the same goal of stamping out war.

  . . . but in all the lines Im big, tough, and smart enough to know how to take good orders and not hear bad ones. 


   “From Time to Time”
by Bruce Stanley Burdick
First publication: Analog, Oct 1983

With the universe nearing its end, Jinma Lor travels to an outpost to converse with antimatter beings whose sense of time is reversed from his own.

 It is possible that the direction in which the associated souls are traveling is always the orientation for which matter becomes more disorganized. 


General Robert E. Lee from the Oct 1983 Analog   “Quarks at Appomattox”
by Charles L. Harness
First publication: Analog, Oct 1983

Colonel von Mainz travels back from the 21st century to 1865 Appomattox with weapons that can make the South win the war and thereby keep America divided, allowing Germany to win the wars of the 20th century.

This is one of the stories that I read in my dad’s Analogs at the end of my tricycle trip to Seattle.

 I left the American sector of Berlin this morning, April 8, in the year two thousand five and sixty, almost exactly two hundred years in your future. I am indeed a colonel, but not in the Prussian army. I am a colonel in the Neues Schutz-Staffeln—the NSS—an underground paramilitary organization devoted to reuniting West and East Germany. 


   The Mackenzie Stories
by John Gribbin
First story: Analog, Sep 1984

Mackenzie, a researcher and problem solver who must continually justify his existence to his benefactor, is puzzled about why the things he sends back in time never reappear, but then in the first story (“Perpendicular Worlds,” Sep 1984 Analog) he starts thinking about Hawking black holes and Everett parallel worlds, and his work continues in a second story (“Random Variable,” Feb 1986 Analog) (although I prefer Gribbon’s science books).

 There must be as many different ways in which the world could have got into the state it is now as there are different ways in which it can develop into the future. 


   “Slan Libh”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Nov 1984

When Kevin O Malley’s home-built time machine becomes operable, he uses it to research his Irish ancestors during the potato blight of 1845.

 The past is changeable but self-correcting. Easy to change small things; harder to change big ones. 


   “The Life of Boswell”
by Jerry Oltion
First publication: Analog, Dec 1984

Michael Wagoner doesn't really want to be an English major and write poetry for the rest of his life, but what choice does he have—until the first day of his final semester when he meets a centerfold.

 All innocence, she turned to the middle, opened the gatefold, held it out sideways, then vertically. I dropped the beer when she shouted, “Grandma!” 


   “Hindsight”
by Harry Turtledove (as by Eric G. Iverson)
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1984

When 1950’s science fiction writer Mark Gordian has a flurry of great stories (“Watergate,” “Houston, We've Got a Problem,” “Neutron Star,” and the ultimate time-travel yarn, “All You Zombies”), Pete Lundquist has nothing but admiration, until Gordian comes out with a story that Pete himself has been outlining.

 “Oh, my God! Tet Offensive!” McGregor stared from one of them to the other. “Youre not telling me that ones based on fact?” 


   “Ben Franklin’s Laser”
by Doug Beason
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1990

It appears that the sun will go nova in 75 hours, which leaves Grayson to go back in time to give a boost to science in Ben Franklin’s time.

 It sounded nice and simple: allow Ben Franklin to invent the laser and let the technology casade. Grow enough so that in five hundred years wed have something to get us out of this mess. 




  Reggie Rivers #7
“Pliocene Romance”
aka “Miocene Romance”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Analog, Jan 1993

How would an animal rights activist view the hunting of extinct species on Reggie’s time safaris?

 But the beasts my clients hunt on these time safaris are all long extinct anyway. Ending the safaris wouldnt bring any dinosaurs or mastodons back to life. 




  Reggie Rivers #8
“The Mislaid Mastodon”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Analog, May 1993

Wait a minute! Didn’t Reggie lay down the law long ago that his time safaris can’t meddle in human times? So how’s he gonna bring back a Mastodon alive for his latest customer?



   The Silurian Tales
by Steven Utley
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1993

I’ve read ten of Utley’s stories of an expedition plopped into the Silurian geologic period, the most recent of which, “The End in Eden,” tells the tale of customs agents Phil Morrow and Sal Shelton, living at the border between the Silurian period and the present, matching wits with NCIS and JAG officers over a case of possible smuggling of Paleolithic biological specimens.
  1. There and Then (Nov 1993) Asimovs
  2. The Age of Mud and Slime (Mar 1996) Asimovs
  3. A Silurian Tale (May 1996) Asimovs
  4. The Wind Over the World (Oct/Nov 1996) Asimovs
  5. The Real World (30 Aug 2000) Sci Fiction
  6. Chain of Life (Oct/Nov 2000) Asimovs
  7. The Despoblado (22 Nov 2000) Sci Fiction
  8. Cloud by Van Gogh (Dec 2000) F&SF
  9. Half a Loaf (Jan 2001) Asimovs
  10. Five Miles from Pavement (21 Mar 2001) Sci Fiction
  11. The World Without (Jul 2001) Asimovs
  12. Walking in Circles (Jan 2002) Asimovs
  13. Treading the Maze (Feb 2002) Asimovs
  14. Foodstuff (Feb 2002) F&SF
  15. Beyond the Sea (29 Aug 2002) Revolution SF
  16. Exile (Aug 2003) Asimovs
  17. Chaos and Gods (18 Aug 2003) Revolution SF
  18. Invisible Kingdoms (Feb 2004) F&SF
  19. Babel (Mar 2004) Analog
  20. Another Continuum Heard From! (2 Apr 2004)   Revolution SF
  21. A Paleozoic Palimpsest (Oct 2004) F&SF
  22. The Wave-Function Collapse (Mar 2005) Asimovs
  23. Promised Land (Jul 2005) F&SF
  24. Silv’ry Moon (Oct/Nov 2005) F&SF
  25. Diluvium (May 2006) F&SF
  26. All of Creation (18 Jan 2008) Cosmos
  27. The World Within the World (Mar 2008) Asimovs
  28. The 400-Million-Year Itch (Apr 2008) F&SF
  29. Variant (Summer 2008) Postscripts
  30. The Woman Under the World (Jul 2008) Asimovs
  31. Slug Hell (Sep 2008) Asimovs
  32. Lost Places of Earth (Jan 2009) in We Think, Therefore We Are
  33. The Tortoise Grows Elate (Mar/Apr 2012) F&SF
  34. The End in Eden (Oct 2012) Analog
  35. The Gift Horse (Fall 2012) in The 400-Million-Year Itch
  36. Sidestep (Spring 2013) in Invisible Kingdoms

 Wheres he going to run to? Home is four hundred million miles away. 

—The End in Eden


   “Time’s Revenge”
by Pauline Ashwell
First publication: Analog, Jun 1995

A housewife has a chance encounter with a time-traveler who deals in ancient artifacts, after which the two of them have time-to-time encounters.

 I had not realised how important the Time Travelers visits had become in my pleasant, prosperous, humdrum existence. 




   The Time-Traveling Terraformers
by Pauline Ashwell
First story: Analog, Aug 1995

Sandy Jennings, an orphan and a red-headed Ph.D. student in microbiology, is recruited into a terraforming project by a group of several hundred time travelers who work in a loosely defined, non-authoritarian structure that spans years of their lifetimes and eons of the planet’s time. Sandy is not seen in the third and fourth stories, which show nick-of-time recruitments of vulcanologist Simon Hardacre and plankton expert Haru.

I liked these last two stories, especially the character of Haru, but I longed for more development beyond what Sandy had already shown us of their common universe.
  1. Hunted Head (Aug 1995) Analog
  2. One Thousand Years (May 2000)    Analog
  3. Out of Fire (Mar 2001) Analog
  4. Elsewhere (Jun 2001) Analog

 Knowledge, absolute and definite knowledge of the future as it affects yourself, is never any use. Whether it is bad or good, you cannot do anything that will change it. It simply takes away your power to decide. 




   “The Chronology Protection Case”
by Paul Levinson
First publication: Analog, Sep 1995

When six of seven physicists (plus one pretty wife) in a time-travel research group meet untimely ends, forensic examiner Phil D’Amato suspects that a paradox-paranoid universe is looking out for itself.

 The drive back to Westchester was harrowing. Two cars nearly side swiped me, and one big-ass truck stopped so suddenly in front of me that I had all I could do to swerve out of crashing into it and becoming an instant Long Island Expressway pancake. 


   The Loose Ends Stories
by Paul Levinson
First story: Analog, May 1997

Time traveler and history meddler Jeff Harris aims for the 1980s to prevent the Challenger explosion, but instead finds himself in the time of JFK, meets the love of his life, meets other time travelers, toys with the idea of assassinating Nixon and Andropov, and eventually does alter Challenger’s history with unintended consequences for the Soviet Union.
  1. Loose Ends (May 1997) Analog
  2. Little Differences (Jun 1998)    Analog
  3. Late Lessons (Oct 1999) Analog

 Do you think that, if someone had a mind to do it—if someone really wanted to and had the connections—that someone back in 1982 to 1984 could have forced Andropov from office—could have replaced him with someone not so dictatorial? 


   “Cosmic Corkscrew”
by Michael A. Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jun 1998

A science fiction writer goes back to 1938 to make a copy of Asimov’s first story before it is lost.

 I looked at the copy of “Cosmic Corkscrew” I held in my hand, and I looked at the Chronobox. 


   “Remembrance of Things to Come”
by Lawrence Watt-Evans
First publication: Analog, Apr 1999

As a first experiment in a new technology, the memories of English Professor Richard Williams are sent back in time into the mind of writer Dorrie Ledbetter right before her untimely death to see if those memories can cause her to leave a clue about the meaning of an ambiguous story.

 We think we have a way to record the quantum state of a present-day brain onto a brain somewhere in the past in such a way that the patterns in the receiving brain will duplicate those in the source brain, and that as a result the receiving brain will acquire the memories of the source brain. 


   The Smedley Faversham Stories
by F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre
First story: Analog Science Fiction, Jun 1999

If a particular conclusion is a good one, what makes you think that only one person will think of it? That’s why Smedley Faversham, in his first time-travel escapade, ran into more than one other time traveler. In all, the punster has had five adventures, each sillier than the last.
  1. Title Publication
  2. Time Lines (Jun 1999) Analog
  3. A Real Bang-Up Job (Jul 2000) Analog
  4. “Put Back That Universe!” (Oct 2000) Analog
  5. Schrödinger’s Cat-Sitter (Jul/Aug 2001) Analog
  6. A Deadly Medley of Smedley (Apr 2003)    Analog
  7. Annual Annular Annals (Jan/Feb 2004) Analog

 When Smedley Faversham traveled back in time to Munich in 1919, the first thing he saw was a large sign reading “THIS WAY TO KILL HITLER.” 


   “Tempora Mutantur”
by H.G. Stratmann
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 1999

While dining at his favorite quiet rib joint, a private man is interrupted by billionaire businessman Rem Caesar who is being chased by time travelers.

 If someone built a time machine, theyd be famous for all time. A magnet for every time traveling historian, media-type, tourist—or just “fans” with no lives of their own, coming back to bask in their idols luminous prescence. 






   The Justin Counting Stories
by Harry Turtledove
First story: Asimov’s and Analog, Dec 1999

At twenty-one, Justin Kloster has it made: one more year of college and then happily ever after with his sweetheart Megan. Then his forty-year-old self shows up to prevent Justin from making terrible mistakes that will lead to an eventual nasty divorce with Megan.

Turtledove tells the story twice: Once from the POV of Justin-21 (“Twenty-One, Counting Up”) and once from the POV of Justin-40 (“Forty, Counting Down”). I loved this technique when Orson Scott Card used in Ender’s Shadow, but for me, it fell flat with Justin, perhaps because the stories didn’t add much to each other.

 I was stupid. I didnt know enough. I didnt know how to take care of her. 


   “Time Out of Joint”
by Pauline Ashwell
First publication: Analog, Jan 2000

A time traveler who makes a living as an antiquities dealer tells a tale of a Greek urn that appeared in two different places at the same time.

 If the Time Traveller sold his wares directly from the maker, modern tests would show that they are only a few years old. They are stored in an underground cavern somewhere in the Pliocene to rack up the appropriate number of centuries, so that tests for thermoluminescence and cosmic ray tracks give the right answer. 


This story appeared in Analog’s Probability Zero series of flash fiction.   “Whose Millennium?”
by Michael A. Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jan 2000

A time-traveling Jew shows up in a police station on the final date of the Hebrew calendar.

 Its September 29, 2239. 


   “How I Won the Lottery, Broke the Time Barrier (or is that Broke the Time Barrier, Won the Lottery), and Still Wound Up Broke”
by Ian Randal Strock
First publication: Analog, Jun 2000

A lowly lab assistant receives a message from his future self with the winning lottery numbers.

 Tomorrows Lotto drawing is for forty-five million dollars. The winning numbers will be 17, 19, 30, 32, 42, and 51. 


   “Built upon the Sands of Time”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2000

Physics professor Owen fitzHugh tells a story in a pub about how a small quantum fluctuation in the past can cause big consequences down the line—and how he may have sent a chronon into the past to do just that.

 Im not sure. A device to excite time quanta, I think. Into the past, of course. 


   “Crow’s Feat”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Nov 2000

Mid-list science fiction writer Paul Gallatin runs into scientist Ivan Ivanovich at a party, and the scientist offers to send Paul back to Shakespeare’s time.

 Tell me, how many copies do you think a book would sell if it proved your belief that Shakespeare was a fraud? 


The two stories were expanded into this 2009 novel.   The Titus Oates Stories
by Brenda W. Clough
First story: Analog, Apr 2001

Titus Oates, a member of Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole, is taken from the time stream and revived in a bewildering 21st century, whereupon he does what any self-respecting explorer would do—heads to the stars!

The two Oates stories (“May Be Some Time” in the April 2001 Analog and “Tiptoe on a Fence Post” in the Jul/Aug 2002 Analog) were combined and expanded for the 2009 novel, Revise the World.

 Not only are you a person rescued from a tragic death, but your removal is supremely unlikely to trigger any change in the time-stream, since your body was lost: presumed frozen solid, entombed in a glacier for eons . . . 




   “What Weena Knew”
by James Van Pelt
First publication: Analog, Apr 2001

James Van Pelt kindly had coffee with me and signed a baseball for me at a Denver science fiction convention—oh, and he wrote (among other things) this fine story of Weena from the moment that H.G. Wells’s time traveller rescued her from the river.

I met the prolific and kind James Van Pelt at a convention in Denver, where we talked about one of his students who later came to Boulder to study computer science. I had misinterpreted a biography of Van Pelt in Analog as if it were an obituary, so I was happy to see the outstanding writer alive and willing to sign a baseball that I presented to him.

 Then a vice clamped her upper arm. A surge. A tremendous force, and she was clear of the stream. Air! There was air to breathe, but all she could do was cough. She was being carried. Her cheek rested on skin. Hough arms wrapped her close until they were on the bank. Gently, her rescuer put her down. Rock warmed her back; her hands lay flat in the heat, her head dropped onto the warmth. Against the sky stood a figure stragely shaped. Weenas vision swirled—she could barely focus—but before she passed out, she saw in wonder, he was a giant. 


   “Grandpa?”
by Edward M. Lerner
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2001

Professor Thaddeus Fitch gives a practical demonstration of the grandfather paradox to his physics classes.

 Imagine that I had the technology with which to visit my grandfather in his youth. Once there, what is to stop me from killing him before hed had the opportunity to reproduce? But if I did succeed, who was it who had travelled backward . . . 


   “Oven, Witch and Wardrobe”
by Tom Sweeney
First publication: Analog, Oct 2001

Siobhan hopes to advance in the time-travelers' hierarchy by successfully transferring plague-doomed children from 1410 Europe to Colonial America.

 It had seemed such an easy thing to do. Beguile hungry children with food, ship their dirty young butts off to colonial America and return to the twenty-third century to become the first researcher ever to use time travel for humanitarian purposes. 


   “Hot Tip”
by Billy Bruce Winkles
First publication: Analog, May 2002

Obscure physicist John Suttle receives a phone call from the future with information about his eventual fate.

 As I said, Im calling you from the twenty-fifth century. I am also a physicist. In fact, Im the leader of a research group thats studying space-time contortion phenomena. Recently, we discovered a way to make phone calls into the past. 


John Allemand’s
interior illustration
   “The Day the Track Stood Still”
by John C. Bodin and Ron Collins
First publication: Analog, May 2003

Did I spot a smidgen of time travel in this delightful story of a race where Babs the car is certainly in love with the driver and vice versa, all in the tense context of knowing that if the race is lost, then the car will be forfeited?

 I tried not to think about what was at stake. The pressure was bad enough without telling her this was for all the marbles: if we lost this Indy 500, she was gone. Sayonara muchacha. Hasta la bye-bye, and good night, Babs. Thats the way it is when you race the Barada. They put up a piece of tech, you put up a piece of tech. Winner takes all, Indy 500 style. 


   “Get Me to the Job on Time”
by Ian Randal Strock
First publication: Analog, May 2003

A man tells the story of his coworker who had a rather mundane use for his discovery of time travel.

 Wally didnt need to see the pyramids getting built, or sail with Columbus, or even watch JFKs assassination. What Wally wanted to do, more than anything, was get to work on time. 


   “3rd Corinthians”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Jun 2003

This is the second Michael F. Flynn time-travel story that I’ve read set in O Daugherty’s Irish pub. This time, amidst philosophical discussion, Father McGinnity tells of a third letter from Paul to the Corinthians that simply couldn’t be genuine.

 Oh, the Bible is true, only it may not always be factual. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Emma” by Kyle Kirkland, Analog, Apr 2003 [simulacrum or similar ]

The story also appeared in this 2008 collection.   “Decisions”
by Michael Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2004

Astronaut gets put in a time loop by aliens.

 Aaron snorted. “I remember that conversation from over six months ago.”
    Gabe shook his head. “It happened this morning.”
 


   “The Dragon Wore Trousers”
by Bob Buckley
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2004

A dinosaur scientist time travels to the middle ages.

 The bizarre beast that rounded the bend in the road made Makers mouth drop in surprise. It was like nothing he had ever seen before, a top-heavy, lopsided creature having four legs, a narrow head atop a long neck, and a huge shiny lump on its back. 


   “Draft Dodgers Rag”
by Jeff Hecht
First publication: Analog, Mar 2004

Time travelers come back to 1969 Berkeley to help Tom, a Vietnam draft dodger.

 They want to be heroes. They think war brings glory and makes them men. I think theyre crazy. Our society up then thinks theyre crazier than your society thinks you are. 


   “The Aztec Supremacist”
by Sheralyn Schofield Belyeu
First publication: Analog, Apr 2004

Dr. Harvey takes a posse back to 1492 to pursue an Aztec descendant who plans to stop Columbus’s voyage.

 Gentlemen, this person tells me that in many years, the Almighty will allow men to journey through time. He says that he has come from the far future with a message for me. 


   “Time Ablaze”
by Michael Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jun 2004

Lucas Schmidt, time-traveler, goes back to 1904 to witness New York City’s most deadly tragedy: a ship full of German Americans on fire.

 A small piece of paper fell out of the book and onto the table. Adele picked it up and examined it. It bore one line: “http://www.general-slocum.com.” She had no idea what it meant; “http” was clearly not a word, although she presumed she knew what the “general-slocum” part referred to. 


   “To Emily on the Ecliptic”
by Thomas R. Dulski
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2004

As part of a therapy to overcome writer’s block, poet Maleus Taub uses an alien artifact Healing Chair to visit Emily Brontë and Emily Dickinson.

 We dont know how it works. Or even what its energy source is. When the field is on weve detected minor fluctuations in certain astronomical objects. 


   “Small Moments in Time”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Dec 2004

A time traveler seeking lost seeds in the past finds a man who may have started the worst influenza of the 20th century.

 The odd truth of working as a temporal interventionist is that some there-and-thens are better than others. 


   “A Few Good Men”
by Richard A. Lovett
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2005

Time travelers from a future without many men come back to our time to import what they need most, but they accidentally snatch Tiffany Richardson as well.

 There were eight good prospects back there, and Id have had them all if this bitch hadnt shown up. 


   “Letters of Transit”
by Brian Plante
First publication: Analog, Apr 2005

A scientist on the first near-lightspeed ship to Centauri A exchanges letters with his underaged girlfriend back on Earth through a wormhole for which time passes at the same rate on both ends. When the ship returns to Earth with its end of the wormhole, the hole will act as a time machine for messages, but the clichéd paradox police won’t let scientist send girlfriend any information about the future.

 You wouldnt want to cause any of those nasty paradoxes, would you? 


   “Working on Borrowed Time”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Jun 2005

Tom and his implanted AI Jeannie (from “Small Moments in Time”) are back again, this time trying to stop future Nazis from destroying Edwardian London.

 What? The British Empire started coming apart in the 1920s? 


   “The Time Traveler’s Wife”
by Scott William Carter
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2005

No, we’re not talking about that wife; we’re talking about Scott William Carter’s version—Yolanda Green, an even-keeled, mostly content wife of a university professor time traveler—and the story of what she does when he goes off into the future, failing to return for dinner.

 “Weve done it,” he said. “Three times with a mouse and five times with a monkey. The university has approved my request for a manned test run. Were going into the future! 


   “Paradox & Greenblatt, Attorneys at Law”
by Kevin J. Anderson
First publication: Analog, Sep 2005

Marty Paramus and his partner specialize in legal nuances arising from the new time-travel technology.

 So you figured that if you kept Franklins biological mother and father from meeting, he would never have been born, your parents marriage would have remained happy, and your life would have remained wonderful. 


   “Written in Plaster”
by Rajnar Vajra
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2006

Thirteen-year-old Danny Levan is a bullied, half-Jewish boy in 1938 Surrey when he discovers strangely colored bits of plaster that can reform into what can only be described as his own protective time-traveling golem.

 A pack of chips was constantly pursuing and reuniting with the giant, but moonlight glinted off of one largish piece that seemed in danger of being left behind, lodged in a groove between cobblestones.
   “Wait,” Danny called out softly and although the creature was obviously too far off to hear, and lacked ears besides, it immediately paused long enough for the chip to free itself and join the others.
 


Broeck Steadman’s interior illustration   “Environmental Friendship Fossle”
by Ian Stewart
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2006

A contract investigator who tracks down crimes against endangered species finds a mammoth tusk that’s only 30 years old according to radiocarbon dating.

 “Mammoth ivory,” the old man said, as if it was a proposition put up for debate. “I have hunt mammoth.” 


   “The Teller of Time”
by Carl Frederick
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2006

You get one guess what happens when you juxtapose these circumstances:
  1. As a boy, Kip Wolverton’s best friend is crushed in a tragic accident in a bell tower.
  2. Then, because Kip is too shy to ever approach the bell-ringer of his dreams, the girl goes and marries his other best friend, so Kip goes off to America to drown his sorrows and become an expert physicist studying time.
  3. Finally, 25 years later, Kip returns to England to do time experiments in bell towers where he finds girl grown and unhappily married.

     “Research money is difficult to come by these days,” said Neville. “There is a lot of good science lanuishing because more meretricious projects get the funds.” 


   “Prevenge”
by Mike Resnick and Kevin J. Anderson
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Nov 2006

Kyle Bain, a member of the Knights Temporal, goes on a mission to prevent a murder in the past because that’s what the Knights do—regardless of whether the murder may be just or not.

 Thou shalt UN-kill, whenever possible. 


   “A Zoo in the Jungle”
by Carl Frederick
First publication: Analog, Jun 2007

Arthur Davidson decided to become an astronaut when his father disappeared on the moon twenty years ago. Now, Arthur and a cosmonaut are exploring the very crater where the father disappeared when they come across an alien-built planetarium that may have the power to reunite Arthur with his father.

 A planetarium on the Moon. Its like a zoo in the jungle, or building a swimming pool under water. Whats the point? 


   “A Bridge in Time”
by Joseph P. Martino
First publication: Analog, Oct 2007

Tom Carson merely fixes time gates from nine to five, while others worry about whether stock pickers (such as his curvacious running partner, Jennifer Campbell) might be passing information to their past selves while they take a detour over a bridge in the past during construction of a new bridge.

 Dont ask me to explain time travel paradoxes. All I do is fix the time gates when something goes wrong. Paradoxes are argued over at a much higher pay grade than mine. 


   “These are the Times”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Nov 2011

Temporal Interventionish Tom and his implanted assistant Jeannie are at the start of the American Revolution, a decidedly TI-crowded time, when they run into Toms love interest Pam, another TI from Toms future who is trying to figure out who fired the first shot.

 The steath-suited TI leveled a weapon, then droped as a stun charge hit. Moments later the other TI weod fired the stun charge fell, then two more TIs appeared and took out whoever had nailed the second TI. But then the stealth-suited TI reappeared, having recovered somewhen in the future and jumped back to try to finish the job. 


   “Anything Would Be Worth It”
by Lesley L. Smith
First publication: Analog, Dec 2007

Physics grad student Abigail thinks that because waves go back through time in one interpretation of quantum physics, she might be able to go back in time, too.

 I just went back in time to save Sophias girls, so I should be able to save my girls! I concentrated with all my might on waves that went back in time, and then I felt a Herculean wrench. 


Jerry Oltion’s
trackball telescope


   “Salvation”
by Jerry Oltion
First publication: Analog, Dec 2007

Physicist William Winters asks the church for money to build a time machine to take him and the Reverend Billy back to the time of Jesus.

 Im talking time travel,” William went on. “You could go back in time and meet Jesus. Assuming he existed.” 


   “Knot Your Grandfather’s Knot”
by Howard V. Hendrix
First publication: Analog, Mar 2008

While sorting through the attic, elderly Mike Sakler finds a note from himself detailing how he must go back in time to save his grandfather from a mugging near the 1939 New York World’s Fair.

 Indeed the notes from that page on were most curious. “Planck energy for opening gap in spacetime fabric = 1019 billion electron volts,” read one, but then that was crossed out with a large X as the writer of the notes took a different tack. 


   “The Beethoven Affair”
by Donald Moffitt
First publication: Analog, Apr 2008

In a world where music companies use time travel to plumb the past for new new pop hits, junior account executive Lester Krieg (no relation to my favorite Seattle Seahawk quarterback) comes up with the idea of getting Beethoven to write a tenth symphony—regardless of the cost.

 Everybody and his brother Jake knows that Beethoven wrote nine symphonies and stopped there. And even the dimmest of music lovers has wish fulfillment fantasies about what a tenth would have sounded like. 




   “Back”
by Susan Forest
First publication: Analog, Jun 2008

Alan and Victor are carrying out a careful sequence of time-travel experiments with slips of paper, flatworms, stray cats, a potted palm and chimps, with the only problem being getting the time traveler back from the past.

 It was while Alan and Victor were touring the warehouse with the real estate agent tht a slip of paper bearing the words, “It worked,&rdqup; materialized on a desk in the office. 


   “Finalizing History”
by Richard K. Lyon
First publication: Analog, Jun 2008

In early 1960, Perry Mason author Earl (not Erle) Stanley Gardner and his wife host John W. Campbell, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Edward Teller, Ronald Reagan, Douglas MacArthur and Jackie Kennedy to discuss a shared dream in which a time-traveling alien requires them to pick one person to eliminate from history as a prerequisite to a final revision of mankind’s history.

 If one of these people dies young, that will pay your debt. 


Mark Evan’s
interior illustration


   “Greenwich Nasty Time”
aka “Wizards of Science”
by Carl Frederick
First publication: Analog, Nov 2008

An experiment causes Great Britain to swap with a century-old version of itself, but fortunately, physics student Paul and his girlfriend Vicki were with their bicycles on the nearby Isle of Wight, so they make the crossing back to the main island and pedal to the rescue.

 The experiment could result in an alternate Great Britain being swapped with ours—one displaced backward in time from the instant of the experiment. 


   “The Affair of the Phlegmish Master”
by Donald Moffitt
First publication: Analog, Jun 2009

Given the title, I figured I might run into comedy or puns, but that wasn’t the case for this story of Dutch historian and translator Peter Van Gaas who travels back to an alternative timeline with a billionaire to commission a Vermeer portrait of the billionaire’s wife while trying not to run afoul of the thug hired by those who have a financial interest in not seeing more works of art from past masters.

 Harrys going to upset a multibillion dollar applecart. I dont know what strings he pulled to get an import license for a priceless artifact from another timeline, but its not going to be worth what he thinks. 


   “Turning the Grain”
by Barry B. Longyear
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug to Sep 2009

By the halfway point of the story, Gordon Redcliff (angry, jaded ex-military sniper and bodyguard) is stranded in a primitive civilization 140,000 years in the past, and he must face the question of whether the widow he’s falling in love with is enough motivation to violate his directive to not interfere with “one hell of a disaster coming in just a matter of a few months.”

 Three weeks in prehistory, Mr. Redcliff. Arent you excited? 


   “Joan”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Nov 2009

It’s comforting to know that when you open a science fiction story named “Joan,” your expectations will be met—as in this story of our heroine Kate, time travel, and Joan of Arc.

 I realize I may seem a little obsessive, but is it so wrong to wish I could have saved her from being burned? She was such a remarkable person and it was such a horrible fate. 


   “A Flash of Lightning”
by Robert Scherrer
First publication: Analog, Dec 2009

High school student Terri Bradbury and her high school class take a field trip to the distant past where Mr. Schoenfield sets off a nuclear explosion to experimentally study three theories of time travel’s effect on the future.

 Well discuss the ethics of time travel in the spring semester. 


   “Red Letter Day”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Analog, Sep 2010

Without completely forbidding it, the government allows limited time travel: Each person may send a single letter from himself or herself at age 50 back to age 18 with information about a single event, though not everyone sends the letter and not everyone approves of the procedure. Our narrator did not receive the letter when she was young, and now she approaches 50 as a counselor for others who do not receive a letter.

 You know the arguments: If God had wanted us to travel through time, the devout claim, he would have given us the ability to do so. If God had wanted us to travel through time, the scientists say, he would have given us the ability to understand time travel—and oh! Look! Hes done that. 




   “The Man from Downstream”
by Shane Tourtellotte
First publication: Analog, Dec 2010

Americus, a despondent time traveler, comes to the 1st century Roman Empire (726 AUC) to introduce clocks, steam engines and other marvels.

The original publication of this story is followed by a Shane Tourtellotte article, “Tips for the Budget Time-Traveler,” about the economics of trading through time.

 He argued to the scribes that they were naturals for typesetting jobs: literate, intelligent, good at fine work and at avoiding mistakes. “Most of us thought we knew. There were many congenial mealtime arguments about which overarching theory of time travel was the true one. I had my ideas, but they dismissed them. I wasnt one of them; I didnt understand.” He ounded a fist into his thigh, a startling burst of violence. “But their theories were such violations of common sense!” 


   “A Snitch in Time”
by Donald Moffitt
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2011

In the same world as the Beethoven and Vermeer affairs, rogue policeman Francis Patrick Delehanty uses his own resources to travel back to the scene of the first homicide that he dealt with as a rookie cop.

 Have you thought this through, Lieutenant? You see a murder in progress. Youre a cop. Do you try to stop it? But youre not a cop in that timeline, are you? Your lieutenants badge is no good there. Are you acting extra-legally? The only badge around belongs to a rookie cop name Delehanty who doesnt have a clue about whats going down. And what if you dont try to stop it? Are you culpable? In that timeline or this one? 


   “Betty Knox and Dictionary Jones in the Mystery of the Missing Teenage Anachronisms”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Mar 2011

Ninety-year-old Jim Jones is sent back into his 15-year-old body in 1964 to help Betty Knox (who is already back in her 15-year-old body and doesn’t expect him) because all the time-travel agents (sent back to that time to avert the world’s toxin disasters) have disappeared with no discernable effect on history.

 And I know that after Johnson, Richard Nixon is elected president. Then comes Ford. Who comes next? 


   The Ian’s Ions and Eons Stories
by Paul Levinson
First story: Analog, Apr 2011

In the first story (“Ian’s Ions and Eons”), a man travels back to December 2000, hoping to alter the momentus Supreme Court decision of that month.

Ian and his cohorts have a reprise in “Ian, Isaac and John” (Nov 2011), where a descendant of David Bowe comes back to 1975, purportedly to improve the mix on a Bowe track, but quite possibly with additional motives involving John Lennon. And there are more stories to come, all in Analog.
  1. Ian’s Ions and Eons (Apr 2011) The 2000 election
  2. Ian, Isaac and John (Nov 2011) David Bowe and John Lennon
  3. Ian, George and George (Dec 2013) Orson Welles to the 1970s

 The Supreme Court will announce its decision the day after tomorrow. Gores people want the recount to proceed in Florida. Bushs do not. 


   “The Man in the Pink Shirt”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Analog, Nov 2012

Hanny Sindros, a writer, travels back to meet John W. Campbell, Jr., and talk about whether the Nazis might gain something from Cleve Cartmill’s atomic power stories.

 What if these German spies see that Astounding has suddenly stopped publishing anything about atomic bombs? What would they do? Theyd think we were hiding something. 


   “Tech Support”
by Richard A. Lovett
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Nov 2012

Still uncertain about what to call his new device to transmit voice over wires, young Alec receives a call from a troubled man who can only be from the future.

 Mr. Watson, come here—I want to see you. 


A revised version of the story appeared as A Time Foreclosed in 2013.   “Time Out”
aka “A Time Foreclosed”
by Edward M. Lerner
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2013

Ex-felon Peter Bitner jumps at the chance for a steady job with Dr. Jonas Gorski, only to end up debating time-travel paradoxes and ethics with the disgraced scientist who keeps building bigger and bigger time machines.

 Stop Hitler and what else do you alter? Millions of lives saved, sure, but billions of lives changed. 


   “The Woman Who Cried Corpse”
by Rajnar Vajra
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2013

Ali Campbell-Lopez’s mother dies and comes out of a coma for the fourth time under circumstances that imply Ali has powers that will interest various national security agencies and enemy spies, prompting a violent assault on Ali and her teenage daughter, soon followed by the appearance of a much younger, time-traveling version of her mother.

 You wanted to build a time machine to go back and save my grandfather! 


   “Pre-Pirates”
by Don D’ammassa
First publication: Analog, Mar 2013

Somewhat lazy computer science graduate Teresa Grant has the power to see written words before they are written, whereupon she publishes the best on her website.

 Could you steal something that didnt exist yet? 


   The Dino-Mating Stories
by Rosemary Claire Smith
First story: Analog, Jul/Aug 2013

Marty Zuber, a lovesick time-ship pilot and bodyguard on Dr. Derek Dill’s trip to the late Cretaceous, is sulky because the girl he’s dating keeps making eyes at Dill in the t-mail messages.

Two later stories continue the love triangle.
  1. “Not with a Bang’ (Jul/Aug 2013) Analog
  2. “Dino Mate’ (Dec 2014) Analog
  3. “Diamond Jim and the Dinosaurs’ (Apr 2016) Analog

 Can you comment on the rumors that youre secretely planning on launching missiles to knock the comet off course and save the dinosaurs? 


   “The Chorus Line”
by Daniel Hatch
First publication: Analog, Dec 2013

Billionaire Mr. Croesus thinks Eric Cunningham faked the 4-million-year-old images of our ancestors dancing that made such a hit on YouTube recently, and he intends to prove it.

 The concensus is that butterflies dont know anything about regression analysis. Things tend to return to their mean over time 


   “It’s Not ‘The Lady or the Tiger’,
It’s ‘Which Tiger?’”

by Ian Randall Strock
First publication: Analog, Apr 2014

When searching for a long-lost ancestor (possibly depressed) whose actions literally gave you a good life, a time traveler would be well advised to frequent said ancestor’s watering holes.

 I came back to offer you comfort, love, happiness, a life of ease. 


   Martin and Artie’s Timeline Restoration Stories
by Bill Johnson
First story: Analog, Dec 2015

Decade by decade, Martin and his AI, Artie (introduced in “When the Stone Eagle Flies”), work to restore their home timeline, continuously hoping that some other damnfool time traveler won’t come along and mess things up again.

For me, the model of time travel doesn’t quite hold together, but perhaps future stories will address the contradictions.
  1. Paris, 1835 (Dec 2015) Analog
  2. When the Stone Eagle Flies (Jun 2016) Analog
  3. Whending My Way Back Home (Jan 2017) Analog

 I was in the way back. Far, far back. I skipped downtime and uptime, back to my past and then up to my home, and everything worked find. Then one day, in the far back, I tried to go home. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Samsara and Ice” by Andy Dudak, Analog, Jan/Feb 2015 [long sleep] and [reincarnation ]



   “The Visit”
by Christopher Jon Heuer
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 28 Mar 2016

Billy’s dad gives an incorrect explanation of why time travel is impossible, an explanation that was worn out when Astounding was still young.

 Dad, do you think time travel is possible? 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Hold the Moment” by Marie Vibbert, Analog, Jun 2016 [personal time rate differences ]

from Halbach’s website   “Alexander’s Theory of Special Relativity”
by Shane Halbach
First publication: Analog, Mar/Apr 2017

After Alexander accidentally strands his girlfriend in the future, he has trouble reestablishing relations with her.

 She turned and slapped him hard across the face. 


aerial view of Masada   “Eli’s Coming”
by Catherine Wells
First publication: Analog, Mar/Apr 2017

Eli ben Aryeh, the founder and head of Time Sharing Adventures, is aiming for the year 10 BCE, but he misses by 75 years and ends up instead at the Romans siege of Masada where he is mistaken for the prophet Elijah.

 But they hadnt existed at the time of Herod the Great. And they hadnt captured Masada until—what, 66 CE? 


C.L. Moore never received a Grand Master award, which is given only to living authors.   “Grandmaster”
by Jay O’Connell
First publication: Analog, Mar/Apr 2017

While her husband is asleep on the couch, renowned science fiction writer C.L. Moore receives a visitor from the future who presents her with a well-deserved award that she never received while alive.

 Shes thirty-six but has felt the same inside since fifteen, when shed read a pulp magazine and knew with absolute certainty what she wanted to do with her life. 


Six other stories by Flynn appeared in this 2012 collection.   “Nexus”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Mar/Apr 2017

The lives of Siddhar Nagkmur (a regretful alien time traveler) and Stacey Papandreon (a tired immortal) converge for the second time since 522 AD; throw in some more aliens and a desperate need to repair the timeline to complete the story.

 Nagkmur finds a chronology on the Internet and searches out a year halfway between the present and their encounter in sixth century Constantinople. The quickest way to identify when things went awry, he tells her, is to work by halves. If AD 1300 is undisturbed, the change came later; otherwise, earlier. 


interior art from Analog   “Shakesville”
by Adam Troy-Castro and Alvara Zinos-Amaro
First publication: Analog, Mar/Apr 2017

Fifty future versions of a man show up in his apartment (49 of whom are corrupted) to warn him of an impending fateful decision that his must make correctly.

 Its not anything fatal. You know it cant be anything fatal, because if it was, thent here would be no future self who could be sent back to warn you. 


Antoine de Saint-Exupéry from The Prisma   “The Snatchers”
by Edward McDermott
First publication: Analog, Mar/Apr 2017

Max, an experienced snatcher of Valuables from the past, joins with newby Nichole to snatch the author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry from his death in World War II.

 Fifty percent of snatchers dont return from their first. Why? Because time is a malevolent killer that tries to eradicate us when we jaunt. But you know all that. 


   “Time Heals”
by James C. Glass
First publication: Analog, Mar/Apr 2017

John’s hatred of his stepfather leads him to the kind of time jump activity that Time Adventures explicitly forbids.

 His second attempt had not been so subtle, a handgun and cartridges smuggled past Time Adventures people who didnt even bother to check his luggage. 


 


226 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)