The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 1935

   “The Prenatal Plagiarism”
by Mort Weisinger
First publication: Wonder Stories, Jan 1935

After the publication of Daniel Cartwright’s wildly successful novel, charges of exact plagiarism from a 50-year-old novel arise, even though he insists that he was the only author.
[Jan 2015;]

   Pre-Superman Comic Books
First time travel: New Fun Comics 1, Feb 1935

Comic books didn’t really take off until the introduction of the Man of Steel in Action Comics 1 (Jun 1938). Before that, many comics were compilations of strips similar to the Sunday funnies, and some of these had time travel. The earliest series that I found was the story of Bobby and Binks, two kids who at first time traveled through a Magic Crystal of History and later just viewed past adventures through the crystal. They first appeared in DC’s first comic book publication, New Fun Comics #1, February 1935, by Adolphe Barreaux. As I find other such series, I’ll add them to my time-travel comic book page. So far, the pre-1939 titles I've found are:
  1. New Fun Comics 1 (Feb 1935) Bobby and Bink
  2. Big Book of Fun Comics Annual (Nov 1935) Bobby and Binks reprints
  3. New Comics 1 (Dec 1935) Fritz the time traveler
  4. More Fun 7 (Jan 1936) Bobby and Binks
  5. The Comics 6-11 (Feb 1938 - Mar 1939) Mickey and Meg’s Enchanted Stone of Time

 Binks: Why—why—I can understand what theyre saying!
Bobby: So can I! Its that magic crystal that did it! 

[Jul 2012]

The first story also appeared in this July 1973 reprint magazine.   The Time Control Stories
by Philip Jacques Bartel
First story: Amazing, Feb 1935

Two Russians (Khalin and Mikhailloff) and an American engineer (Earl Lyons) find a way to step outside of time, view the future, then step back into time at the very point that they left, thereby preventing bad things such as Mikhailloff’s murder (in “When Time Stood Still,” Amazing, Feb 1935) and an insult that’s intended to start a war (“The Time Control,” Amazing, Dec 1936).
[Nov 2013]

   “Valley of the Rukh”
by Harl Vincent
First publication: Amazing, Feb 1935

Pilot Stanley Kent and his client, spoiled authoress Ruth Owens, find themselves in a piece of Venus that’s been transported from the past, whereupon they have exciting adventures.
[Nov 2013]

   “The Prophetic Voice”
by Laurence Manning
First publication: Wonder Stories, Apr 1935

A voice, purporting to be from the future, warns mankind that they must all go into suspended animation or face extinction; mankind obeys, but when they wake up, the people at the other end of the future phone don’t know anything about the earlier message.
[Nov 2013]

Brick Bradford #5,
Jul 1948
   Brick Bradford
by William Ritt and Clarence Gray
First time travel: 20 Apr 1935

Ritt and Gray introduced The Time Top as a short-lived separate topper strip on April 20/21, 1935, and it first appeared in Brick’s Sunday strip on Oct 17, 1937; thereafter, it frequently took the comic strip adventurer into the future (and occasionally the past).

Brick’s strips were reprinted as early as 1934 with two hardcover issues of Saalfield Comics (#1059 and #1309). He was reprinted in King Comics starting with the first April 1936 issue, and he headlined one 1938 hardcover Big Little Book (#1468, combining text with line illustrations). Some Ace Comics had reprints (1947-49), and he appeared in four issues of his own comic book: #5 (Jul 1948) to #8 (Jul 1949) that were possibly strip reprints. In the 60s, new Brick backup features appeared in some issues of The Phantom, Mandrake the Magician (at least #5, #6 and #10) and Flash Gordon (at least #14, #16, #17). They probably all used the top, but I don’t know for sure. All that was just in the U.S.: He was vastly more popular in Australia and New Zealand.

 Into the past . . . into the future . . . read on for another exciting adventure in time with Brick Bradford  

Brick Bradford and the Time Top 25, Australia

[Dec 2010]

   “Alas, All Thinking”
by Harry Bates
First publication: Astounding, Jun 1935

Charles Wayland is tasked with discovering why his cold-hearted college buddy and all-around genius (I.Q. 248) physicist Harlan T. Frick has abandoned everything technical for mundane pursuits such as golfing, clothes, travel, fishing, night clubs, and so on—and the explanation may have to do with either Humpty Dumpty or Frick’s trip to the future with an average (but meditative) young woman named Pearl who is most curious about love.

 I showed her New York. Shed say, “But why do the people hurry so? Is it really necessary for all those automobiles to keep going and coming? Do the people like to live in layers? If the United States is as big as you say it is, why do you build such high buildings? What is your reason for having so few people rich, so many people poor?” It was like that. And endless. 

[Jan 2013]

   “A Thief in Time”
by Vernon H. Jones (as by Raymond A. Young)
First publication: Wonder Stories, Jul 1935

A scientist sends gangster Tony Carponi to steal some radium, and only years later does Carponi realized that the caper involved time travel.
[Apr 2013]

   The Bungle Family
by Harry J. Tuthill
First time travel: 23 Jul 1935

Father and husband George Bungle saw his comic-strip family through various adventures as early as 1918 (then called “Home, Sweet Home”) including a trip on his own to the year 7324 in the story that ran from July to October of 1935.

 Why anyone knows this is the year 7324. What did you think it was, old-timer? 

[Jun 2016]

   “The Branches of Time”
by David R. Daniels
First publication: Wonder Stories, Aug 1935

James Bell invents a time machine, sees the end of mankind in the near future, travels further to see man’s successor, returns to mankind’s end to save the species, and visits the Mesozoic, anticipating Bradbury’s Butterfly Effect.
[Nov 2013]

   “The Kingdom of Thought”
by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach
First publication: Amazing, Aug 1935

Donald Stile is transported to the future by a Time Sphere where he finds two groups of giant brains (the good white brains and the evil black brains) battling—but what of the grey brain?
[Nov 2013]

   “The Man Who Met Himself”
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: Top-Notch, Aug 1935

Among physicists, the most favored resolution to time-travel paradoxes is a world of one fixed landscape of time and its events. Time travel may be possible, but if so, the Karma will conspire to have only those events that have been written into the landscape to occur. Heinlein’s “—All You Zombies—” may be the pinnacle of such stories, but Farley’s is the earliest case that I’ve read to present a clear deterministic time loop along these lines. In the story, Boston stock broker Dick Withrick is on a 1935 tiger hunt in Cambodia when he runs into a strangely familiar (and slightly older) man who warns him, “As you value your freedom, do not touch the machine—” And yet, he does touch the machine, taking him back to 1925 so he (in the company of his Buddhist Abbot host) can relive the decade of financial turmoil.

 “It cannot be,” the Abbot asserted suavely. “The years from 1925 to 1935 happen only once in the whole course of eternity. You are not now living through a repetition of those ten years. Rather it is those same ten years. The events which you remember as having happened back in Boston, and the events which are happening here today, are happening simultaneously. Your ten years in Boston from 1925 to 1935, are one and the same ten years. It is only an illusion of your mind that they seem to be successive, rather than concurrent. And this illusion is not so different from the illusion of all mankind with respect to the flow of timel for Brahm, the Creator, sees all time and all space as once complete instantaneous event.” 

[Feb 2015]

This story was reprinted in the Winter 1951 issue of Fantastic Story Quarterly   “The Reign of the Reptiles”
by Alan Connell
First publication: Wonder Stories, Aug 1935

Sanders is kidnapped and sent to a laboratory in the far past from which he escapes to find a civilization of intelligent, winged reptiles—possibly the first story of intelligent dinosaurs in our past.
[May 2015]

   “Night”
by John W. Campbell, Jr. (as by Don A. Stuart)
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1935

Bob Carter takes a plane up to 45,000 feet to test an anti-gravity device, but instead it hurls him into the same future as the story “Twilight”—but whereas the earlier story had mankind who were dying out in 7,000,000 A.D. because of the ubiquity of machines, Carter finds himself billions of years beyond that, with both man and (most) machines long gone.

 Ah, yes, you have a mathematical means of expression, but no understanding of that time, so it is useless. But the last of humanity was allowed to end before the Sun changed from the original G-O stage—a very, very long time ago. 

[Jan 2013]

   “The Fall of Mercury”
by Leslie F. Stone
First publication: Amazing, Dec 1935

Mort Forrest and his fellow explorer Bruce are headed for supposedly uninhabited Mercury when they are captured by Mercurians intent on taking over the solar system, but fortunately, a friendly Saturnian named Chen-Chak (with a ray gun that can momentarily transfer bad guys into the future) rescues them, tells them of the history of species from all the planets, and saves the solar system.
[Nov 2013]

The story also appeared in Phil Stong’s 1941 anthology, The Other Worlds.   “The Fourth-Dimensional Demonstrator”
by Murray Leinster
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1935

Pete Davidson has inherited all the properties of an uncle who had been an authority on the fourth dimension, including the Fourth-Dimensional Demonstrator that can pull copies of matches, coins, dollar bills, fiancées and kangaroos out of the past.

 Its produced another burnt match. Dragged it forward out of the past, sir. There was a burnt match at that spot, until the glass plate moved a few seconds ago. Like the girl and the banana peel, sir. The machine went back to the place where the match had been, and then it went back in time to where the match was, and then it brought it forward. 

[Jul 2013]

   “Human Machines”
by J. Harvey Haggard
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1935

When the megalomanic and utopia-builder Lan Darth is opposed by Therm Sutner, Darth throws Sutner into a horrid future world that is populated by strange creatures that arose out of Darth’s eugenic and policies that banned sexual reproduction.
[Feb 2013]

   “Time Found Again”
by Mildred Cram
First publication: Cosmopolitan, Dec 1935

Bart Henderson hates his life in 1935, longing for a daughter without painted fingernails and curled coxcombs, a son without bloodshot eyes at the breakfast table, a wife less jaded. Then his army buddy visits and suggests that nothing is ever lost in time, and it might be possible for the human mind to tear off the veils and return to a time such as the 18th century that Bart longs for.

It was fun to see both the advertisements and the innovation of Cosmopolitan to publish a time-travel story by the prolific Mildred Cram in 1935. The style reminds me of later Jack Finney stories of the 50s.

 He ran a few steps forward in the dark, stumbling. The syncopated, thudding hoofbeats broke rhythm, paused . . . And Bart Henderson found himself, in broad daylight, standing beside a fine carriage driven by a coachman in livery, drawn by two black horses with silver-trimmed harness. 

[Jan 2012]
 

Additional Adventures (without Time Travel)

I often see potential time-travel stories that, alas, have no time travel. I track them, so that I don’t process these same chronotypical stories over and over in a time loop of my very own.
1935

 These arent the droids youre looking for . . . move along. 


 1935
“The 32nd of May” by Paul Ernst [parallel universes]

“The Fourth-Dimensional Demonstrator” by Murray Leinster [despite title, no time travel]

“Relativity to the Rescue” by J. Harvey Haggard [ftl]

“The Worlds of If” by Stanley Weinbaum [viewing alternate pasts]


22 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)