Time-Travel Fiction

  Storypilot’s Big List of Adventures in Time Travel



The Shadow
created by Walter B. Gibson
First time travel: 1 Jan 1939

Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of time travelers? I found one time-travel episode of The Shadow: the Jan 1, 1939 NBC radio broadcast of “The Man Who Murdered Time”:

 My machine bends the staight track of time, curves it, curves it, so that the time track forms a perfect circle! 

[Jun 2011]



DC Comics (Anthologies)
First time travel: Adventure Comics 37, Apr 1939

Like all the other publishers, DC also published anthologies of weird stories (as opposed to continuing characters) in the 50s, but even before that, they had anthologies of adventure stories. The earliest time travel that I’ve found so far is a five-part story of “A Playboy in King Arthur’s Court” starting in in Adventure Comics 37. As for the 50s weird stories, the first one I found there was a tale in Strange Adventures 4. As I find others, I’ll list them in my time-travel comic books page.

 History runs wild when Columbus, Napolean, and Cleopatra journey through time from the past to the present! 
—from the cover of Strange Adventures 60

[Jun 2012]



Alley Oop
created by V.T. Hamlin
First time travel: 5 Apr 1939

The caveman’s first exposure to time travel was in the 5 April, 1939 daily strip, shortly before Dr. Wonmug brought the insignts of the boisterous Alley Oop to the 20th century and elsewhere in time.

The image to the left is from Alley Oop #12 from Standard’s 1947-49 run of nine comics (#10-#18) that reprinted strips. The first one (#10) had pre-time-travel strips, but all of the rest probably included some time travel. The time machine picture to the right is from Dragon Lady Press strip reprints in the 1980s.

I’ve also found one Alley Oop take-off called Irving Oops in an the EC comic Panic 8, May 1955—which makes me wonder whether that other Irving of the comics, Irving Forbush, ever time traveled.

 By golly, kid, I’d swear that thing wasn’t there a while ago! I’m gonna see what-- 
—Alley Oop watching a camera from the future dissolve away, 5 Apr 1939

[Dec 2010]

“Life-Line”
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Aug 1939


Dr. Pinero develops a tool that can follow a man’s lifeline to its end, returning an echo from the future that tells the man’s exact time of death.

This story doesn’t meet my usual criteria for time travel, but it’s close enough, and it’s Heinlein’s first published story.

 Old Bidwell, not so, of Amalgamated Life Insurance? And he wanted his trained seals to expose me as a fraud, yes? For if I can tell a man the day of his own death, no one will buy is pretty policies. 

[Jul 1972]

Arch Oboler’s Plays
by Arch Oboler
First time travel: 9 Sep 1939


Arch Oboler was a prolific radio playright from the mid-1930s, starting with NBC’s Lights Out radio show. One of the stories in the 1939 Arch Oboler’s Plays series was “And Adam Begot,” which told the story of two men and a woman thrown back into prehistoric times. The story appear in print in a 1944 anthology, was reprised for the 1951 Lights Out tv show, and formed the basis for a 1953 Steve Ditko story in the Black Magic comic book.

 The young dramalist expects to face his biggest casting problem in filling the roles of the two Neanderthal men which he has written into “And Adam Begot.” He wants a voice, he explains, which will instantly suggest a cave-man to the radio listener. With that in mind, he conducted a survey of what people expect in a Neanderthal voice. “A cross-section of the answers,” Oboler says, “suggests a bass voiced prizefighter, talking double talk with his mouth full of hot potatoes.” 
—The Lima News, 9 Sep 1939

[[May 2015]]

Lest Darkness Fall
by L. Sprague de Camp
First published as complete novel: Unknown, Dec 1939



During a thunderstorm, archaeologist Martin Padway is thrown back to Rome of 535 A.D., whereupon he sets out to stop the coming Dark Ages.

 Padway feared a mob of religious enthusiasts more than anything on earth, no doubt because their mental processes were so utterly alien to his own. 

[May 2012]

Top-Notch Comics
by Otto Binder and Jack Binder
First publication: Dec 1939



The first two issues of Top-Notch Comics had a feature called “Scott Rand in the Worlds of Time” written by science fiction staple Otto Binder and drawn by his older brother, Jack (rather than Earl). Rand first drove his time car back to Rome in 200 A.D. where he picked up Thor. In the second episode, they went to New York in 2000 A.D. Jack Binder continued the episodes of Rand and Thor in #3, heading to Mars of the future, but I don’t yet know whether there were any other stories.

This title morphed into Top-Notch Laugh Comics, and was then acquired by Archie Comics. I don’t know whether there were any further adventures in time by Rand or others during the Top-Notch run.

 The time car is working perfectly! We can go anywhere...the past or the future! 
—Dr. Meade in Top-Notch Comics 1

[Jun 2012]

“Bombardment in Reverse”
by Norman L. Knight
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Feb 1940

Jamie Todd Rubin wrote about this story as part of his Vacation in the Golden Age, and I got a pdf copy on Thanksgiving Day in 2012. The story tells of two alien nations at war—a somewhat amateurish was by Martian or Terrestrial standards, but one in which time-traveling weapons target where the enemy was in the past.

 The Nyandrians are attacking Strofander with shells which traverse not only space, but time as well. 

[Nov 2012]
This mimeographed Futurian publication was probably printed on the same mimeograph machine as the first mimeo of
“The Final Men.”

“The Final Men”
by H.G. Wells
First separate publication: Mar 1940 by Futurian Robert W. Lowndes


The first complete, published version of The Time Machine appeared as a five-part serial in the January through May 1895 issues of New Review, edited by William Ernest Henley. In the introduction to the 1924 edition, Wells wrote about the back-and-forth between himself and Henley, saying that “There was a slight struggle between the writer and W.E. Henley who wanted, he said, to put a little ‘writing’ into the tale.”

One piece of that writing was a short episode after the traveller leaves the Eloi and the Morlocks, just before visiting the red sun and the end of the world. This episode was deleted from both the American (Holt text) and the British (Heinemann text) published book editions of the novel, but it did appear as a 7-page mimeographed and stapled publication from American fan and Futurian Robert W. Lowndes in 1940, and it appeared in a number of other places, sometimes called “The Grey Man” and once called “The Missing Pages.”

 No doubt, too, the rain and snow had long since washed out the Morlock tunnels. A nipping breeze stung my hands and face. So far as I could see there were neither hills, nor trees, nor rivers: only an uneven stretch of cheerless plateau. 

[Jan 2013]

Silver Streak Comics
by Jack Cole, et. al.
First time travel: Dickie Dean in Silver Streak 3, Mar 1940

Jack Cole, the Playboy cartoonist, must have been a little boy when he wrote the adventures of Boy Inventor Dickie Dean. Dickie’s inventions included a machine to capture conversations from the past (Silver Streak Comics 3), a time camera (probably in issue 10). You could argue that neither of these is real time travel, but never mind.

I’ll bet there was more time travel in Silver Streak; for example, #1 has a story called “As Time Stops” starring Mister Midnight. But the originals are nearly impossible to track down, so I may never know whether they have time travel for sure.

 Without getting technical, this is a “time camera”! It is possible to reconstruct and photogaph scenes of the past with this machine! 

[Jun 2012]

“Hindsight”
by Jack Williamson
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, May 1950

Years ago, engineer Bill Webster abandoned Earth for the employ of the piratical Astrarch; now the Astrarch is aiming the final blow at a defeated Earth, and Bill wonders whether the gunsites that he invented can site—and change!—events in the past.

 He didn’t like to be called the Renegade. 

[Jun 2011]

“The Mosaic”
by J.B. Ryan
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1940
Emir Ismail (a soldier and scientist in a Muslim-led 20th century) travels back to the crucial Battle of Tours in 732 A.D.

This is the first story that I read via electronic interlibrary loan with the help of the University of Colorado librarians.

 History is built event by incident—and each is a brick in its structure. If one small piece should slip— 
—John W. Campbell’s introductory blurb for the story

[Aug 2011]

“Who’s Cribbing”
by Todd Thromberry
First publication: Macabre Adventures, Aug 1940

 Dear Mr. Gates,
   ...Please write and tell me what you think of my theory.
Respectfully,
Jack Lewis
 


“Rescue into the Past”
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: Amazing Stories, Oct 1940

Physicist Barney Baker, now a lawyer, uses his time machine to go back to the sacking of Fort Randolph in 1776 where he hopes to find evidence for an important legal case. He does find that along with attacking Redcoats and Indians and a beautiful young woman who instantly captures his heart, but alas, he can save nothing and no one—or can he?

 Go back there again to 1776, and this time do things right. Go back to just before Caroline’s death, and this time rescue her. Why not! 

[Feb 2015]

“Sunspot Purge”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Nov 1940

“Read the News Before It Happens!” That’s the slogan that reporter Mike Hamilton proposes when the Globe buys a time machine. But when Mike goes onto the future beat, it’s more than just the stock market and the Minnesota-Wisconsin football game that he runs into—it’s the world of 2450 with only scattered population.

 Think of the opportunities a time machine offers a newspaper. The other papers can tell them what has happened and what is happening, but, by Godrey, they’ll have to read the Globe to know what is going to happen. 

[Aug 2011]

“Trouble in Time”
by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth (as by S.D. Gottesman)
First publication: Astonishing Stories, Dec 1940
I enjoyed this early effort from the two young Futurians, especially the beginning where chemical engineer Mabel Evans of Colchester, Vermont, goes to visit the newly arrived mad scientist who offers her ethyl alcohol and a trip to the future.

 That was approximately what Stephen had said, so I supposed that he was. “Right as rarebits,” I said. 

[Dec 2013]

“The Mechanical Mice”
by Eric Frank Russell
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jan 1941 (as by Maurice G. Hugi)
Slightly mad scientist Burman invents a time machine that lets him see the future, from whence he brings back other inventions including a swarm of reproducing mechanical beasties.

 I pinched the idea. What makes it madder is that I wasn’t quite sure of what I was stealing, and, crazier still, I don’t know from whence I stole it. 

[Apr 2012]

“The Best-Laid Scheme”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Feb 1941

I like the verb that de Camp coined for forward time travel—vanwinkling—but when the hero, De Witt, chases Hedges back in time, they start changing things and everyone (including them) remembers both the old time and the new. It’s beyond me to grok that form of time travel, but I give credit for creativity.

 The problem of backward-jumping has not hitherto been solved. It involves an obvious paradox. If I go back and slay my own grandfather, what becomes of me? 

[Mar 2012]

“Doubled and Redoubled”
by Malcolm Jameson
First publication: Unknown, Feb 1941

Jimmy Childers was certain of two things: that last night he’d set the alarm to silent (even though it went off this morning) and that yesterday, June 14th, was the perfect day, the likes of which could certainly never be repeated again.

This is the earliest sf story that I’ve seen with a time loop, although there was the earlier 1939 episode of The Shadow.

 Jimmy had the queer feeling, which comes over one at times, he was reliving something that had already happened. 

[Nov 2013]

“Poker Face”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Mar 1941
The accountant, Mr. Face, joins the poker game and, among other things, has the remarkable ability to rig any deal without even touching the cards—what else would you expect for a man who’s traveled some 30,000 years from the future?

 “Now spill it. Just where did you come from?”
   “Geographically,” said Face, “not very far from here. Chronologically, a hell of a long way.”
 

[Jul 2001]

“Not the First”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Apr 1941
As Earth’s first starship passes the light-speed barrier, strange things happen to its acceleration—and to the passage of time.

 Still, it was odd that the lighting system should have gone on the blink on this first ‘night’ of this first trip of the first spaceship powered by the new, stupendous atomic drive. 

[Dec 2010]

“Time Wants a Skeleton”
by Ross Rocklynne
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jun 1941
After seeing a skeleton with a well-known ring on its finger, a spaceship is thrown back in time and the crew believes that one of them is fated to become that skeleton. This is an early story that addresses the question of whether something known about the future must become true.

 He could feel the supple firmness of her body even through the folds of her undistended pressure suit. 

[Dec 2011]

“Yesterday Was Monday”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Unknown Fantasy Fiction, Jun 1941

Harry Wright goes to bed on Monday night, skips over Tuesday, and wakes up in a Wednesday that’s not quite been built yet.

 The weather makers put .006 of one percent too little moisture in the air on this set. There’s three-sevenths of an ounce too little gasoline in the storage tanks under here. 

[Jul 2001]



Fawcett Comics
First time travel: Wow Comics 2, Summer 1941


Time travel made it to the Marvel family in 1942, or at least the the earliest instance that I’ve spotted was a Captain Marvel story of that year (“The Amazing Trip into Time” in Whiz Comics #26 from 23 Jan 1942). Between then and the lawful demise of Fawcett’s Marvels, the whole family (the Captain, Mary Marvel, Captain Marvel Jr., the Lieutenant Marvels) and the evil Dr. Sivana had a myriad of time-travel episodes by various means from Father Time to the doctor’s time pill to the captain’s time chair.

Fawcett also had other comics, some with time travel, such as Atom Blake who met himself in time in Wow Comics 2 and Nyoka, the Jungle Girl who traveled to prehistoric times in issue 10. As I find more of those, I’ll list them on my time-travel comics page.

 OMIGOSH! Now I remember everything! I went to the past in order to prevent Captain Marvel from ever existing! But when I got to the past, all I did was re-live the same events as before! Curses! 
—Dr. Sirvana from Captain Marvel Adventures #80

[circa 1970]

“I Killed Hitler”
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: Weird Tales, Jul 1941
This story does get bonus points for being the earliest kill-hitler time-travel story that I know of (and for predicting Pearl Harbor), but I didn’t fully follow the ending (after the killing) of this story where a distant cousin to the great dictator goes back to 1899 to gain the trust of the boy he knows will grow up to cruelly rule Europe.

 “You think so?” The Swami shook his head. “Ah, no. For it is written that there must be a Dictator—not only a Dictator, but this particular Dictator”to rule over docile Europe, and plunge the world in war.” 

[Feb 2015]

Methuselah's Children
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul/Aug/Sep 1941


The time travelin’ didn’t commence until 1973 in Time Enough for Love, but trust me and read this one anyhow to get Lazarus’s back story.

 “‘Life is short—’”
“‘—but the years are long.’”
“‘Not,’” Mary responded, “‘while the evil days come not.’”
 

[Jul 1969]
The story also appeared in this 2000 collection.
“The Probable Man”
by Alfred Bester
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1941
Years before The Demolished Man, there was Bester’s probable man. I looked forward to reading it as the first story of my retirement, and I enjoyed the time-travel model that Bester set up: David Conn travels backward from 2941 to World War II, but then returns to a vastly changed future. For me, though, I found the naïve attitude toward war unappealing.

 She’d be Hilda Pietjen, daughter of the prime minister, just another chip in the Nazi poker game. And he’d be dead in a bunker, a thousand years before he’d been born. 

[Jan 2012]

“Sidetrack in Time”
by William P. McGivern
First publication: Amazing Stories, Jul 1941
Philip Kingley has a plan to get rid of his time-traveling professor some 5000 years in the future. Unfortunately, the ending to Philip’s professor also got rid of any chance more than half a star in my rating.

 He scrambled out of the machine, the delirious feeling of success and power coursing through his veins like strong drink. His eyes traveled about the laboratory, slowly, gloatingly. All of it his. The equipment, the formulas, and most of all—the time machine. 

[Apr 2014]



The Weapon Shop Stories
by A.E. van Vogt
First story: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1941



Time travel plays only a small role in Van Vogt’s three stories and a serial. The stories follow the immortal founder of The Weapon Shops, an organization that puts science to work to ensure that the common man is never dominated by government or corporations. Along the way, a 20th century man becomes a time-travel pawn, a young man seven millennia in the future takes advantage of a much shorter time-travel escapade, and you’ll spot at least one other time-travel moment.

All the stories were fixed up into two books, The Weapon Shops of Isher and The Weapon Makers, and the SFBC gathered both those into The Empire of Isher.

 The Seesaw (Jul 1941)Astounding 
The Weapon Shops (Dec 1942)Astounding
The Weapon Makers (Feb-Apr 1943)Astounding
The Weapon Shops of Isher (Feb 1949)Thrilling Wonder Stories

 What did happen to McAllister from the instant that he found the door of the gunshop unlocked? 

[Jul 1969]

“Backlash”
by Jack Williamson
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Aug 1941

Although it doesn’t involve Hitler by name, this story may be the start of the Use-a-Time-Machine-to-Kill-Hitler subgenre.

 With the new tri-polar units I can deflect the projection field back through time. That’s where I’m going to attack Levin—in his vulnerable past. 

[Dec 2011]
The story also appears in the 1953 collection Assignment in Eternity, including this copy which I bought at Heathrow while waiting for my mother to arrive for my wedding.
“Elsewhere”
aka "Elsewhen"
by Robert A. Heinlein (as by Caleb Saunders)
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1941


Professor Arthur Frost has a small but willing class of students who explore elsewhere and elsewhen.

 Most people think of time as a track that they run on from birth to death as inexorably as a train follows its rails—they feel instinctively that time follows a straight line, the past lying behind, the future lying in front. Now I have reason to believe—to know—that time is analogous to a surface rather than a line, and a rolling hilly surface at that. Think of this track we follow over the surface of time as a winding road cut through hills. Every little way the road branches and the branches follow side canyons. At these branches the crucial decisions of your life take place. You can turn right or left into entirely different futures. Occasionally there is a switchback where one can scramble up or down a bank and skip over a few thousand or million years—if you don’t have your eyes so fixed on the road that you miss the short cut. 

[Feb 1980]
Asimov’s “Nightfall” also appeared in this issue.
“Short-Circuited Probability”
by Norman L. Knight
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1941
Our hero, Mark Livingston, finds a dead human body that is older than the human race—but still quite clearly his own body along with a highly evolved traveling companion.

 This is a story of something that did—or didn’t—happen. Question is, can it be properly said that it did or did not? 
—Campbell’s introduction to the story

[Dec 2010]

“By His Bootstraps”
by Robert A. Heinlein (as by Anson MacDonald)
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Oct 1941



Bob Wilson, Ph.D. student, throws himself 30,000 years into the future, where he tries to figure out what began this whole adventure.

Evan Zweifel gave me a copy of this magazine as a present!

 Wait a minute now—he was under no compulsion. He was sure of that. Everything he did and said was the result of his own free will. Even if he didn’t remember the script, there were some things that he knew “Joe” hadn’t said. “Mary had a little lamb,” for example. He would recite a nursery rhyme and get off this damned repetitive treadmill. He opened his mouth— 

[Dec 1974]

“Snulbug”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Unknown Worlds, Dec 1941

In need of $10,000 to open a medical clinic, Bill Hitchens calls forth Snulbug, a one-inch high demon who likes the warmth in Bill’s pipe, and orders the demon to retrieve tomorrow’s newspaper and bring it back to today.

 Then as soon as I release you from that pentacle, you’re to bring me tomorrow’s newspaper. 

[Jan 2013]







DC Superhero Comics
First time travel: Adventure Comics 71, Feb 1942

As a kid, I never read DC (Why would I? Excelsior!), but I’ve read some DC time-travel comics since then (don’t tell Stan). The earliest DC time travel that I’ve found was in 1942, but as for the big boys, the Caped Crusader and the Boy Wonder got the jump on the Man of Steel by a few months: Batman’s first travel was back to ancient Rome in Batman #24 via hypnosis by Professor Carter Nichols. Here’s a table of notable DC first time-travel experiences that I’ve found through 1969 (after that, everything became time-travel chaos):

 Starman (Feb 1942)Adventure Comics 71 
Justice Society of America    (Apr/May 1942)All Star Comics 10
Green Arrow, et. al. (Jun 1942)Leading Comics 3
Green Lantern (Spring 1943)Green Lantern 7
The Shining Knight (Jul 1943)Adventure Comics 86
Batman and Robin (Fall 1943)World’s Finest 11
Wonder Woman (Nov 1946)Wonder Woman 20
Superman (Jan-Feb 1947)Superman 44
Johnny Quick (Nov 1948)Adventure Comics 134
Superboy (May/Jun 1949)Superboy 2
Lois Lane (Jan 1951)Action Comics 152
Blackhawk Commandos (Dec 1951)Blackhawk 47
Rex the Wonder Dog (Oct 1954)Rex 17
Jimmy Olsen (Sep 1955)Jimmy Olsen 7
The Flash (Oct 1956)Showcase 4
Legion of Super-Heroes (Apr 1958)Adventure Comics 247
Aquaman (Aug 1958)Adventure Comics 251
Challengers (Nov 1958)Chal. of the Unknown 4
Rip Hunter (May 1959)DC Showcase 20
Supergirl (Aug 1959)Action Comics 255
Adam Strange (Dec 1960)Mystery in Space 62
The Atomic Knights (Jun 1961)Strange Adventures 129
Elongated Man (Nov 1961)The Flash 124
JLA (Mar 1962)Justice League of America 10
The Atom (Nov 1962)The Atom 3
J’onn J’onzz (Dec 1962)Detective Comics 305
The Spectre (Apr 1966)Showcase 61
Eclipso (Jul 1966)House of Secrets 79
Prince Ra-Man (Jul 1966)House of Secrets 79
Sea Devils (Dec 1966)Sea Devils 32
[circa 1990]

“The Immortality of Alan Whidden”
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: Amazing Stories, Feb 1942
The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction characterizes Farley as “a rough-hewn, traditional sense-of-wonder writer,” who “as a consequence became relatively inactive with the greater sophistication of the genre after WWII.” But by the time of this story, Farley’s rough-hewn edges of his 1920s Radio Man stories had been smoothed out, and I find his writing to be engaging. I’ll grant that he never stepped away from the view of women as mere objects of beauty, and his characters have too much purity or evil with no examination of the morality of murdering a greedy man. Also, I have seen only stereotyped presentations of other cultures, but his time-travel plots are still fun and worthy of study. In this story, an immortal man serendipitously invents time travel which takes him from 1949 back to the time of his dastardly grandfather and a consistent resolution of the grandfather paradox.

 Framed in the front doorway stood a gloriously radiant girl of under twenty. Her flaunting reddish-brown hair was the first feature that caught Whidden’s admiring gaze. Then her eyes, yellow-green and feral, set wide and at just the least little slant, beneath definitely slanted furry brows of the same tawny color as the hair. Lips, full and inviting. Complexion, pink and cream. And a gingham clad figure, virginally volupuous. A sunbonnet hung down her back from strings tied in a little bow beneath her piquant chin. 

[Feb 2015]

“Recruiting Station”
aka Masters of Time (1942); Earth’s Last Fortress (1960)
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Mar 1942

When the Glorious begin shanghaiing military recruits throughout time, Miss Norma Matheson and her once-and-future boyfriend Jack Garson are caught up in 18 versions of our solar system and a Glorious-vs-Planetarians war.

 We are masters of time. We live at the farthest frontier of time itself, and all the ages belong to us. No words could begin to describe the vastness of our empire or the futility of opposing us. 

[Mar 2012]

“Some Curious Effects of Time Travel”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Apr 1942
The very first Probability Zero story in Astounding took us on a romp back in time by the members of the Drinkwhiskey Institute to obtain saleable specimens of Pleistocene fauna, we learn that time travel has an effect on aging (coincidentally, the same effect described by Gaspar in Chapter 9 of El Anacronópete).

 A curious feature of time travel back from the present is that one gets younger and younger, becoming successively a youth, a child, an embryo and finally nothing at all. 

[Nov 2012]

“Time Pussy”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Apr 1942 (as by George E. Dale)

Mr. Mac tells of the troubles of trying to preserve the body of a four-dimensional cat.

 ‘Four-dimensional, Mr. Mac? But the fourth dimension is time.’ I had learned that the year before, in the third grade. 

[Jul 1972]
This issue also contains Asimov’s first Foundation story.
“Forever Is Not So Long”
by F. Anton Reeds
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, May 1942
The professor’s handsome assistant, Stephen Darville, is in love with the professor’s beautiful daughter and wants to spend every waking moment with her, but duty calls—duty to build a time machine, of course, in which the youthful assistant can go ten years into the future to return with the more polished time machines that will be produced by the professor’s very own technicians over the next ten years.

 The technicians would “save” themselves ten years of labor and the new sweeping highway in the future and the past would be open to mankind within the life of its discoverer. 

[Dec 2012]

“The Ghost of Me”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Unknown Worlds, Jun 1942

After Dr. John Adams is murdered, his ghost accidentally begins haunting some time before the murder occurred.

 I’ve simply come back into time at the wrong point. 

[Jan 2013]
The story also appears in Groff Conklin’s 1952 anthology, The Omnibus of Science Fiction.
“Heritage”
by Robert Abernathy
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jun 1942
Nick Doody, inventor of the time machine and sole explorer through time, ventures some nine millennia beyond what he reckons was the fall of mankind.

 Are you not a Man, and do not Men know everything? But I am only a... 

[Apr 2012]
The story also appeared in this 1975 collection.
“My Name Is Legion”
by Lester del Rey
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jun 1942
At the end of World War II, as the Allies occupation army closes in on Hitler, a man offers him a way to bring back thousands of copies of himself from the future.

 Years ago in one of those American magazines, there was a story of a man who saw himself. He came through a woods somewhere and stumbled on a machine, got in, and it took him three days back in time. Then, he lived forward again, saw himself get in the machine and go back. 

[Apr 2007]

“Time Dredge”
by Robert Arthur, Jr.
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jun 1942

I haven’t yet read this story which appeared only in Astounding, but Jamie Todd Rubin writes that the story is of two men who seek a German professor who plans to pull things out of ancient South America to help the Germany win World War II.

 The German professor had a nice idea for making archeology a branch of Blitzkrieg technique—with the aid of a little tinkering with Time. 
—John W. Campbell’s introduction to the story

[Dec 2013]
The story also appeared in this 2003 collection.
“Secret Unattainable”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1942
After his brother is killed by the Nazis, Herr Professor Johann Kenrube invents a machine that promises a little of everything to Hitler—unlimited energy and natural resources, instant transportation behind enemy lines, even a smidgden of time travel—but only after the Germans have over-committed themselves, does the truth about the machine emerge.

 Kenrube was at Gribe Schloss before two P.M., March 21st. This completely nullifies the six P.M. story. Place these scoundrels under arrest, and bring them before me at eight o’clock tonight. 
—comment on a memo from Himmler

[May 2012]

“About Quarrels, about the Past”
by John Pierce
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1942
In addition to A.E. van Vogt’s “Secret Unattainable,” the July 1942 Astounding also had three short, short time travel stories as part of the magazine’s Probability Zero series. In this story, our narrator tells of the quirky Quarrels who took his time machine into the past—or we should say some past— to woo the winsome Nephertiti.

 Well, didn’t you realize that this uncertainty holds for the past, too? I hadn’t until Quarrels pointed it out. All we have is a lot of incomplete data. Is it just because we’re stupid? Not at all. We can’t find a unique wave function. 

[May 2012]
Some other flag covers from July 1942
“The Strange Case of the Missing Hero”
by Frank Holby
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1942
Many magazines across the U.S. featured a flag on the cover in this patriotic month. In this second Probability Zero story of the issue, Elliot Gallant, hero to the people and beacon light of courage, was the first man to travel through time; Sebastian Lelong, editor of the Encyclopedia Galactica, aims to find out why he never returned.

This is the earliest story that I’ve spotted anywhere with the time traveler coming to know his own mother.

 Elliot Gallant went back into time thirty years. He liked the peaceful days of yesteryear. He married, had a son. 

[May 2012]
Interior artwork for the Probability Zero series
“That Mysterious Bomb Raid”
by Bob Tucker
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1942
Sitting around Hinkle’s, the narrator tells the story of how he, Hinkle and the local university scientist took a bomb back in time in an attempt to nip World War II in the bud.

 Well, sir, that little machine traveled so fast that before we could stop it we found ourselves in the last century. Somewhere in the 1890s. We were going to drop our oil drip there but I happened to remember that my grandfather was spending his honeymoon in Tokyo sometime during that decade— 

[May 2012]

“Time Marches On”
by Ted Carnell
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Aug 1942
Also appearing in the first ever Probability Zero column (along with de Camp’s story, listed above, and a story by Malcolm Jameson) is Carnell’s tale of a group of science fiction authors who explore the consequences of a simple time machine that can be built from radio parts, but can take the traveler only into the future.

 Yes, they were practically all here, thought Doc Smith, as his gaze moved from one to another of the circle. Williamson, Miller, Hubbard, Bond, McClary, Rocklynne, Heinlein and MacDonald, and many others who had once written about the mysteries of time travel—so many hundreds of years ago now. 

[Sep 2012]

“Barrier”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1942
John Brent travels 500 years into the future only to find that he can’t return because the authoritarian state has erected barriers to change that include regularization of all verbs and temporal barriers that prevent backward time travel.

 That is only to be expected when you jump five hundred years, but it is nonetheless perplexing to have your first query of" “What city is this?” answered by the sentence: “Stappers will get you. Or be you Slanduch?” 

[Nov 2012]
The story also appeared in Healy and McComas’s famous 1946 anthology, Adventures in Time and Space.
“The Twonky”
by by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1942

A dazed man (apparently dazed from running into a temporal snag) appears in a radio factory, whereupon (before returning to his own time) he makes a radio that’s actually a twonky which gets shipped to a Mr. Kerry Westerfield, who is initially quite confounded and amazed at all it can do.

 The—robot— was trying to be helpful. Only Kerry would have preferred to remain drunk. 

[Sep 2012]

The Anachron Stories
by Malcolm Jameson
First story: Astounding Science Fiction, Oct 1942
Golden-age favorite Malcolm Jameson wrote three stories of Anachron, Inc., a company that recruits ex-commandos for their “foreign” department—a euphemism for intertemporal commerce.

 Anachron, Inc. (Oct 1942)Astounding 
Barrius, Imp. (Jan 1943)Astounding
When Is When? (Aug 1943)Astounding

 We can use a limited number of agents for our “foreign” department, but they must be wiry, active, of unusually sound constitution, and familiar with the use of all types of weapons. They MUST be resourceful, of quick decision, tact and of proven courage, as they may be called upon to work in difficult and dangerous situations without guidance or supervision. Previous experience in purchasing or sales work desirable but not necessary. EX-COMMANDO MEN usually do well with us. 

[Nov 2012]

“The Case of the Baby Dinosaur”
by Walter Kubilius (as by J.S. Klimaris)
First publication: Future Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct 1942
Futurian Walter Kubilius wrote this story about Wilbur and Stevenson, two members of the Society for the Investigation of Unusual Phenomena, who must track down a time-machinist jokester who, among other things, drops a baby dinosaur in Times Square, plops Cleopatra into a modern beauty contest, and brings Shakespeare to a modern-day theater.

 A time-machinist with a sense of humor! 

[Apr 2014]

The Thunderbolt
drawn by Rafael Astarita
First publication: Doc Savage Comics #10, Nov 1942

According to the Michigan State University Comic Art Collection index, Doc Savage #10 included a 7-page origin of a superhero called The Thunderbolt (aka Dr. Adams). The story involved a scientific princess and time travel, but the hero was never heard from again. (Maybe he/she is lost in time.)

 With the aid of the mystic powers of Princess Ione, mistress of scientific wonders... 
—from the splash page

A translation appeard in the all-Boucher issue of Urania (10 Feb 1991). Strangely enough, “snulbug” translates as “snulbug” in Italian; however “Elsewhen” is “Viaggio nel tempo.”
“Elsewhen”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jan 1943

Private detective Fergus O’Breen investigates Harrison Patrigde, inventor and ne’er-do-well, who accidentally invents a short-range time machine, causing him to envision how the world (and the lovely Faith Preston) will admire him if only he can get enough money to build a bigger version (perhaps via a murder with the time machine providing an alibi).

 Time can pass quickly when you are absorbed in your work, but not so quickly as all that. Mr. Partridge looked at his pocket watch. It said nine thirty-one. Suddely, in the space of seconds, the best chronometer available had gained forty-two minutes. 

[Nov 2012]

“The Search”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jan 1943

When salesman Ralph Carson Drake tries to recover his missing memory of the past two weeks, he discovers that he had interactions with a woman named Selanie Johns who sold remarkable futuristic devices for one dollar, her father, and an old gray-eyed, man who is feared by Selanie and her father.

Van Vogt combined this with two other stories and a little fix-up material for his 1970 publication of Quest for the Future.

 “Just grab his right shoulder with that glove, from behind,” SpockPrice was saying. “Press below the collarbone with the points of your fingers, press hard.” 

[Apr 2012]
The story also appeared in this 1952 collection.
“Time Locker”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jan 1943
Once again, drunken genius Gallegher invents something without knowing that he has done so’this time, a box that swallows things up until they reappear at now + x.

 He was, Vanning reflected, an odd duck. Galloway was essentially amoral, thoroughly out of place in this too-complicated world. He seemed to watch, with a certain wry amusement, from a vantage point of his own, rather disinterested for the most part. And he made things— 

[Dec 2010]

“The Angelic Angleworm”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Unknown Worlds, Feb 1943
If Charlie Wills and you have patience, then Charlie will figure out what’s causing those strange occurrences (such as an angleworm turning into an angel) and you will figure out that angels can time travel.

 We can drop you anywhere in the continuum. 

[Aug 2011]

“Mimsy Were the Borogroves”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Feb 1943



A scientist in the far future sends back two boxes of educational toys to test his time machine. One is discovered by Charles Dodgson’s niece in the 19th century, and the other by two children in 1942.

This story was in the first book that I got from the SF Book Club in the summer of 1970, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume 1 (edited by Robert Silverberg). I read and reread those stories until the book fell apart.

 Neither Paradine nor Jane guessed how much of an effect the contents of the time machine were having on the kids. 

[Jul 1970]

“Sanctuary”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jun 1943
Mr. Holding, an American poet in Vichy France before the U.S. came into the war, visits an American scientist who is trying to stay neutral as he builds his time machine.

 I am, sir, a citizen of the world of science. 

[Jan 2013]

“Paradox Lost”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Oct 1943
During a philosophy lecture, the left hand of bored college student Shorty McCabe disappears, at which point Shorty figures he may as well follow whereever the hand went, which turns out to be into a time machine invented by the only kind of person who could invent such a thing—a crazy man.

 But a time machine is impossible. It is a paradox. Your professors will explain that a time machine cannot be, because it would mean that two things could occupy the same space at the same time. And a man could go back and kill himself when he was younger, and—oh, all sorts of stuff like that. It’s completely impossible. Only a crazy man could— 

[Dec 2012]

Dick Devins, King of Futuria
First appearance: Mystery Comics 1, 1944

Dick Devins was a 20th century time traveler who protected the 30th century from all that was evil. He appeared in the four 1944 issues of Mystery Comics (#1-4) and in at least four 1947 issues of Wonder Comics (#11-14).

 Twenty-four hours in the 30th century, eh? Sounds interesting—if your time machine works! I’ll take your offer, professor! 
—from the splash page in Mystery Comics 1

[Jun 2012]

“As Never Was”
by P. Schuyler Miller
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jan 1944

One of the first inexplicable finds by archealogists traveling to the future is the blue knife made of no known material brought back by Walter Toynbee who promptly dies, leaving it to his grandson to explain the origin of the knife.

 I knew grandfather. He would go as far as his machine could take him. I had duplicated that. He would look around him for a promising site, get out his tools, and pitch in. Well, I could do that, too. 

[Mar 2012]
The story also appeared in August Derleth’s 1948 anthology, Strange Ports of Call.
“Far Centaurus”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jan 1944

Four men set out for Alpha Centauri on a 500-year journey where each will awaken only a handful of times. That’s not time travel, of course, but be patient.

Van Vogt combined this with two other stories and some fix-up material (especially for “Far Centaurus”) for his 1970 publication of Quest for the Future.

 We’re here! It’s over, the long night, the incredible journey. We’ll all be waking, seeing each other, as well as the civilization out there. Seeing, too, the great Centauri suns. 

[Apr 2012]

Archie Comics
created by John L. Goldwater, Vic Bloom and Bob Montana
First time travel: Archie 7, Mar 1944


I’d like to know more about time travel by Riverdale’s upstanding citizens. The earliest I found was in “Time Trouble” from Archie 7 (Mar 1944), which did get the jump on Batman by five months. Later episodes were in Pep 131 (Feb 1959) and at least a handful of 1960s stories.
[Dec 2010]

“And Adam Begot”
by Arch Oboler
First publication: Out of This World, May 1944

I haven’t yet read this story, which came from Oboler’s 1939 radio play of the same name. It was later turned into a tv episode of Lights Out and was the basis of a Steve Ditko story in the Black Magic comic book (1953).
[May 2015]

Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies Cartoons
voices by Mel Blanc
First time travel: 28 Oct 1944



I hope I’ll find more time travel in the Warner Brothers cartoons, but for starters, there’s “The Old Grey Hare” where Elmer Fudd is taken far into the future—past 1990!— where he chases bugs with the Buck Rogers Lightning Quick Rabbit Killer, and Daffy Duck with Speedy Gonzalez in “See Ya Later, Gladiator” (1968).

 When you hear the sound of the gong, it will be exactly twoooooo thowwwwwsand Ayyyyy Deee! 

[Jul 2013]

“The Pink Caterpillar”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Adventure, Feb 1945

After Norm Harker tells of a magic man who can bring you back a single item from the future (for the right price), Anthony Boucher’s detective Fergus O’Breen tops the story with the tale of how he figured out why a dead American living in Mexico liked to call himself a doctor.

 At least that’s the firm belief everywhere on the island: a tualala can go forward in time and bring you back any single item you specify, for a price. We used to spend the night watches speculating on what would be the one best thing to order. 

[Dec 2012]

Classic Comics’
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

adapted by Jack Hearne
First publication: Classic Comics #24, Sep 1945


Jack Hearne’s illustrations provided an abbreviated but accurate adaptation of Hank Morgan’s medieval travails.

 Ah! I’ve got it! On June 21st, 528, there was a total eclipse of the sun, but in 1879 there was none...now to wait...that will prove everything! 

[Jun 2011]

“Mr. Lupescu”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Weird Tales, Sep 1945

Time travel makes a cameo appearance in this story in which young Bobby tells his Uncle Alan about his godfather, Mr. Lupescu, who has a great big red nose, red gloves, red eyes, and little red wings that twitch.

 But one of Mr. Lupescu’s friends, now, was captain of a ship, only it went in time, and Mr. Lupescu took trips with him and came back and told you all about what was happening this very minute five hundred years ago. 

[Jan 2013]

“What You Need”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Oct 1945
Reporter Tim Carmichael visits Peter Talley, a shopkeeper on Park Avenue who provides for a select clientele things that they will need in the future.

I never include prescience stories in my list, but like Heinlein’s “Life-Line,” this one is an exception.

   

[Apr 2012]

“The Chronokinesis of Jonathan Hull”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jun 1946

Private Eye Fergus O’Breen is back for his third and final encounter with time travel, this time with a time traveler who shows up dead in his room one day and is alive and walking in a stilted manner the next. In the process of explaining himself, the traveler also displays knowledge of Boucher’ traveler in “Barrier” and also of Breen’s other time travel encounters.

 And now, I realize, Mr. O’Breen, why I was inclined to trust you the moment I saw yoiur card. It was through a fortunately preserved letter of your sister’s, which found its way into our archives, that we knew of the early fiasco of Harrison Partridge and your part therein. We knew, too, of the researches of Dr. Derringer, and how he gave up in despair after his time traveler failed to return, having encountered who knows what unimaginable future barrier. 

[Dec 2012]

“Film Library”
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1946

Each time a film goes through Peter Caxton’s projector at Tichenor Collegiate, it gets replaced with a different film from the future.

Van Vogt combined this with two other stories and a little fix-up material for his 1970 publication of Quest for the Future.

 Not that he would necessarily have suspected anyway that he had come into possession of films that had been made more than fifty years in the future. 

[Apr 2012]

Prize Comics’ Frankenstein
by Dirk Briefer
First time travel: Jul 1946



I’m always on the lookout for early depictions outside of sf with a climb-in-able time machine where you set the dials and go. Briefer’s humorous Frankenstein had just a such a machine in a 9-page story in issue #3 (Jul 1946). Frankenstein runs into Professor Goniph, and they travel in his machine to 2046 and 1646, although there is a twist at the end.

 It works!! It works!!! I am a genius!! We are in 2046!!! 

[Jan 2012]
The story also appeared in this 1982 collection.
“Blind Time”
by George O. Smith
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1946
Oak Tool Works has developed a handy time treatment whereby a portion of any tool can be sent into the future for a limited time, but it's movements during that time must exactly mirror the movements of the rest of the tool during the current time. Peter Wright is the insurance adjuster who must examine an accident that the treatment is going to cause at 8pm.

 There is that element of wonder, too, you know. Every man in the place knows that someone is going to get clipped with that crane. 

[Mar 2012]

“Vintage Season”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1946

More and more strange people are appearing each day in and around Oliver Wilson’s home; the explanation from the euphoric redhead leads him to believe they are time travelers gathering for an important event.

 Looking backward later, Oliver thought that in that moment, for the first time clearly, he began to suspect the truth. But he had no time to ponder it, for after the brief instant of enmity the three people from—elsewhere—began to speak all at once, as if in a belated attempt to cover something they did not want noticed. 

[Jun 2011]

Timely Comics
founded by Martin Goodman
First time travel: All Winners Comics 21, Winter ’46-47


Timely was the predecessor to Atlas which became Marvel Comics in the ’60s. Some of their superheroes survived that transition (Captain America, the Sub-Mariner, and an android Human Torch, among others). I’ve only begun to dig up their time travel, finding one issue of All Winners Comics where Captain America and the All Winners Squad do battle with a man from 1,000,000 A.D. Also, in 1948, the Timely superhuman, comical boxer, Powerhouse Pepper, visited the pilgrims via time machine (#4, Sep 1948).

 Project yourselves far into the fture...to the year one million A.D. The Earth is almost unfit for human life! 
—Captain America in All Winners Comics 21

[Jun 2012]

“The Man Who Never Grew Young”
by Fritz Leiber, Jr.
First publication: in Night’s Black Agents, 1947

Without knowing why, our narrator describes his life as a man who stays the same for millennia, even as others, one-by-one, are disintered, slowly grow younger and younger.

The story is soft-spoken but moving, and for me, it was a good complement to T.H. White’s backward-time-traveler, Merlyn.

 It is the same in all we do. Our houses grow new and we dismantle them and stow the materials inconspicuously away, in mine and quarry, forest and field. Our clothes grow new and we put them off. And we grow new and forget and blindly seek a mother. 

[Apr 2012]

“Child’s Play”
by William Tenn
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Mar 1947

Sam Weber, an underemployed lawyer, receives a Bild-a-Man kit as a Christmas gift from 400 years in the future—and it’s a timely gift, too, seeing as how he could use a replacement girlfriend.

 Bild-a-Man Set #3. This set is intended solely for the use of children, between the ages of eleven and thirteen. The equipment, much more advanced that Bild-a-Man Sets 1 and 2, will enable the child of this age-group to build and assemble complete adult humans in perfect working order. 

[May 2015]

“Time and Time Again”
by H. Beam Piper
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Apr 1947


At 43 years old, Allan Hartley is caught in a flash-bomb at the Battle of Buffalo, only to wake up in his own 13-year-old body on the day before Hiroshima.

Piper’s first short story impacted me because I fantasize about the same thing (perhaps we all do). What would you do? Who would you tell? What would you try to change? What would you fear changing?

 Here; if you can remember the next thirty years, suppose you tell me when the War’s going to end. This one, I mean. 

[Jan 2012]

“Tomorrow and Tomorrow”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Fantastic Adventures, May 1947
When a typewriter appears on the floor of his boarding room and begins typing messages from the future, down-on-his-luck Steve Temple thinks that it must be his old jokester friend Harry—but he’s wrong about that, and the fate of the world 500 years down the line now depends on what Steve does about the upcoming election.

“Tomorrow and Tomorrow” doesn’t have the notority of that other Bradbury story about time travel and an elected official, but even though this one’s riddled with ridiculous ideas on time, it does accurately predict text messaging!

 Sorry. Not Harry. Name is Ellen Abbot. Female. 26 years old. Year 2442. Five feet ten inches tall. Blonde hair, blue eyes—semantician and dimentional research expert. Sorry. Not Harry. 

[Apr 2012]

Repeat Performance
by Walter Bullock and William O’Farrell
First release: 22 May 1947

After Sheila Page kills her husband in a fit of passion on New Year’s Eve, she wishes nothing other than to have the entire year back—if destiny will only let her.

 How many times have you said, “I wish I could live this year over again?” This is the story of a woman who did relive one year of her life... 

[Jan 2015]

“Errand Boy”
by William Tenn
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jun 1947
When invention mogul Malcolm Blyn spots an unusual can of paint that a young boy brings to his factory, he begins to wonder whether it came from the future and what else the future may hold.

 I hand him an empty can and say I want it filled with green paint—it should have orange polka dots. 

[Apr 2012]

“The Figure”
by Edward Grendon
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1947
The narrator, along with his pals Dettner and Lasker, are frantically working on a machine that can bring something back from the future before they all called away by the army to work on some cockroach problem.

I enjoy stories with some personal connection to myself (and generally award an extra half star). In this case, the connection is Alfred Tarski, the Polish logician who was the advisor of the advisor of my own academic advisor, David B. Benson.

 Lasker is a mathematician. He specializes in symbolic logic and is the only man I know who can really understand Tarski. 

[May 2015]

“Meddler’s Moon”
by George O. Smith
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1947
Joseph Hedgerly travels back in time some 60 years to ensure that his grandfather marries the right woman.

 Either we live by accident and die by accident, or we live by plan and die by plan. If our lives are written in the Book of Acts, then no effort is worth the candle. For there will be those who will eternally strive to be good and yet shall fail. There will be others who care not nor strive not and yet will thrive. Why? Only because it is so written. And by whom? By the omnipotent God. Who, my friends, has then written into our lives both the good and the evil that we do ourselves! He moves us as pawns, directs us to strive against odds, yet knows that we must fail, because he planned it that way. 

[Mar 2012]



DC Funny Comics
First time travel: All Funny Comics 20, Nov 1947

It seems that everyone in the DC stable wanted to get in on the road to time travel including the earliest that I’ve found so far in the Nov 1947 issue of All Funny Comics. Later, there were Bob Hope (in Bob Hope 43) and Jerry Lewis (in Jerry Lewis 43 and 54). In Bob’s story, he gets sent into the future by Carolyn Spooner. It also had a cover with Bob as a caveman. As I find others, I’ll list them in my time-travel comic books page.

 This can’t be the stone age!—I’m just putty in the hands of a girl like you! 
—from the cover of Bob Hope 43

[Jun 2012]

Brick Bradford Movie Serial
by George Plympton, Arthur Hoerl and Lewis Clay
First release: 18 Dec 1947



In fifteen episodes, Brick travels to the moon to protect a rocket interceptor while his pals take the time top to the 18th century to find a critical hidden formula.

 Maybe tomorrow you’ll be visiting your great, great grandmother. 

[Dec 2010]

“Me, Myself and I”
by William Tenn
First publication: Planet Stories, Winter 1947

As an experiment, a scientist sends unemployed strongman Cartney back 110 million years to make a small change. He makes this first change, which changes things in the present, and then he must go back again and again, whereupon he meets himself and him.

I keep finding earlier and earlier stories with the idea of destroying mankind by squishing a bug, and I am wondering whether this is the earliest linchpin bug (although that doesn’t actually happen here).

 Maybe tomorrow you’ll be visiting your great, great grandmother. 

[Jan 2012]

“Double Cross in Double Time”
by William P. McGivern
First publication: Fantastic Adventures, Feb 1948

I like stories that begin with a want ad, including Heinlein’s Glory Road and the recent movie Safety Not Guaranteed. This is the earliest such story that I’ve seen, in which Paddy Donovan answers the ad (just off Fourth Avenue) to find Professor O’Neill, the professor’s angelic daughter, and a machine that stimulates a man’s dormant ability to travel through time. So, after a quick jaunt to ancient Egypt, Paddy offers to bankroll the development of the time machine’s business potential.

 Opening for young man of adventurous nature. Opportunity for travel, excitement, glory. 

[May 2015]

“The Monster”
aka "The Brighton Monster"
by Gerald Kersh
First publication: Saturday Evening Post, 21 Feb 1948
In April of 1947, a man makes a connection between a tattooed Japanese man and a monster that washed up in Brighton two centuries earlier.

 I should never have taken the trouble to pocket his Account of a Strange Monster Captured Near Brighthelmstone in the County of Sussex on August 6th in the Year of Our Lord 1745. 

[Jan 2014]



The Thiotimoline Stories
by Isaac Asimov
First story: Astounding Science Fiction, Mar 1948

I don’t know if this is time travel or not, but it certainly violates causality when the time for thiotimoline to dissolve in water is minus 1.12 seconds.

 The Endochronic Properties of Resublimated Thiotimoline (Mar 1948)Astounding 
The Micropsychiatric Properties of Thiotimoline (Dec 1953)Astounding
Thiotimoline and the Space Age (Oct 1960)Analog
Thiotimoline to the Stars (Nov 1973)Analog
Antithiotimoline (Dec 1977)Analog

 Mr. Asimov, tell us something about the thermodynamic properties of the compound thiotimoline. 
—Professor Ralph S. Halford to Asimov at the conclusion of his Ph.D. oral exam on May 20, 1948.

[Apr 2012]

“The Tides of Time”
by A. Bertram Chandler
First publication: Fantastic Adventures, Jun 1948
Upon his 21st birthday, the twentieth in the line of descendents of Aubrey St. John Sheraton is to be taken into confidence about the secret of his family’s centuries-long financial success.

 I’d wait five hundred years for you, my darling. 

[Feb 2015]

“Time Trap”
by Charles Harness
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Aug 1948
The story presents a fixed series of events, which includes a man disappearing at one point in the future and (from his point of view) reappearing at the start of the story to then interact with himself, his own wife, and the evil alien.

It’s nice that there’s no talk of the universe exploding when he meets himself, but even so, the story suffers from a murkiness that is often part of time-travel stories that are otherwise enjoyable. The murkiness stems from two points: (1) That somehow the events are repeating over and over again—but from whose viewpoint? (2) The events are deterministic and must be acted out exactly the same each time. I enjoy clever stories that espouse the viewpoint of the second item (“By His Bootstraps”). But this does not play well with the first item, and (as with many stories), Harness did not address that conflict nor the consequent issue of free will. Still, I enjoyed the story and wish I’d met Harness when I traveled to Penn State University in the spring of 1982.

 But searching down time, Troy-Poole now found only the old combination of Troy and Poole he knew so well. Hundreds, thousands, millions of them, each preceding the other. As far back as he could sense, there was always a Poole hovering over a Troy. Now he would become the next Poole, enmesh the next Troy in the web of time, and go his own way to bloody death. 

[Jul 2011]

“The Brooklyn Project”
by William Tenn
First publication: Planet Stories, Fall 1948

So far, this is the earliest story I’ve read with the thought that a miniscule change in the past can cause major changes to our time. The setting is a press conference where the Secretary of Security presents the time-travel device to twelve reporters.

 ...shifting a molecule of hydrogen that in our past really was never shifted. 

[Jul 2011]

Hallmark Playhouse
hosted by James Hilton
First time travel: 3 Mar 1949 in Berkeley Square


Before tv’s Hallmark Hall of Fame, CBS aired the half-hour Hallmark Playhouse on its radio networks. I spotted only one time-travel episode, the well-worn Berkeley Square, which aired on 3 Mar 1949.

 An ancestor of mine built this house in 1730. See that picture there, above the fireplace? His father. Look at it. 

[Feb 2015]


Young William Shatner

Studio One
created by Fletcher Markle
First time travel episode: 20 Mar 1949 (“Berkeley Square”)



Almost every week for a period of nearly eleven years (7 Nov 1948 to 29 Sep 1958), Studio One presented a black-and-white drama to CBS’s television audience. We can claim some of the tv plays as our own in the sf genre, and at least two included time travel (a “Berkeley Square” remake on 20 March 1949, and “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” on 19 May 1952). One other sf connection comes from Studio One clips of William Shatner (in “The Defender”, 1957) which were used to portray a young Denny Crane in an episode of Boston Legal (“Son of the Defender”, 2007).

 You’ve heard of the transmigration of soul; have you ever heard of the transposition of a man’s body in time and place? 
—A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

[Jan 2015]

ACG Anthoology Comics
founded by Benjamin W. Sangor
First time travel: Adventures into the Unknown 4, Apr 1949

ACG had a handful of weird story comic books including Adventures into the Unknown, Forbidden Worlds and Forbidden Worlds. I picked up a few of these at garage sales as a kid, but never really got into them. The earliest time travel that I’ve found so far was a story called “Back to Yesterday” in Adventures into the Unknown 4. Some of the issues are now available on google books.

 It’s supposed to work by producing a displacement in the hyper-temporal field by means of a powerful mesotronic stasis of the continuum—and anyone near the machine’s field will immediately be projected into the future! 
——Hugh Martinson in “Adventure into the Future”

[Jun 1965]

A Connecticut Yankee
in King Arthur’s Court

adapted by Edmund Beloin (Tay Garnett, director)
First release: 22 Apr 1949



You know the story of Hank Morgan well enough by now, but do you know Edmund Beloin’s (one of Bob Hope’s writers) musical version with bumpkin Bing Crosby? This is my favorite of all the filmed versions.

 ♫Lord help the sister, who comes between me and my sister,
and Lord help the mister, who comes between me and my maaaan!♫
 
—oops, wrong Crosby movie!

[Jan 2015]

Mighty Mouse Comics
First time travel: Mighty Mouse 11, Jun 1949

Surely Mighty Mouse time traveled in his comics many times, but the one that I ran across in the Michgan State University library records is a 2-page text piece called “The Time Machine”in #11. I haven’t read it, so I can’t say whether it’s fiction or perhaps something on H.G. Wells’s story.

The mouse did save the day himself via time travel in 1961 (Mighty Mouse 152). As I find other instances, I’ll add them to my time-travel comics page.

What Mad Universe
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Oct 1949

Suppose that a novel has no time travel, but when the hero, Keith Winton, is blown into a parallel universe (replete with alien invaders, a bigger-than-life hero, and scantily clad spacefaring women), the only way he can make a living is writing a time-travel story. Do I include the novel in my list? Normally, no—but this is Fredric Brown!

 It was a time-travel story about a man who went back to prehistoric times—told from the point of view of the cave man who encountered the time traveler. 

[Nov 2012]

The Man Who Lived Backward
by Malcolm Ross
First publication: 1950

Mark Selby, born in June of 1940, achieves a unique perspective on life and war and death due to the fact that he lives each day from morning to night, aging in the usual way, but the next morning he wakes up on the previous day until he eventually dies just after (or is it before?) Lincoln’s assassination.

 Tomorrow, my tomorrow, is the day of the President’s death. 

[Feb 2013]

Pebble in the Sky
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: 1950

Joseph Schwartz takes one step from 1949 to the year 847 of the Galactic Era, where he meets archaeologist Bel Arvardan, Earth scientist Dr. Shekt, the doctor’s beautiful daughter Pola, and a plot to destroy all non-Earth life in the galaxy.

 He lifted his foot to step over a Raggedy Ann doll smiling through its neglect as it lay there in the middle of the walk, a foundling not yet missed. He had not quite put his foot down again... 

[Nov 1970]

“Stranded in Time”
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: The Omnibus of Time, 1950
Only Farley himself knows his intent with this story, but to me it seems as if he were trying to make amends for his sexist tales of bygone pulp days by writing a story of football player cum physics student Milton Collett and his beautiful—but not airheaded—gal, Carolyn Van Horn, who together take a one-way trip to a future in which roles of men and women have been reversed. For me, Farley didn’t quite pull it off.

 His interne stared at him with awed respect. A man—able to read! 

[Feb 2015]
The story also appeared in the second volume of Fantasy Book toward the end of 1950.
“The Man Who Lived Backward”
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: The Omnibus of Time, 1950
Although this story shared a title with Malcolm Ross’s 1950 book of the same name, Farley’s story has but a small scope and a technical bent, explaining the natural mechanism that has taken the psychiatric patient known as Sixtythree and turned him into someone who (among other backward things) calls his beloved Margaret “Gnillrahd Tellagrahm!”

 For example, I well remember the night when he woke up the entire Asylym by yelling “Fire!”, just before the boiler explosion which nearly caused a holocaust. 

[Feb 2015]
Farley wrote time travel stories in his spare time while under his birth name, Roger Sherman Hoar, he was a patent lawyer—and I have no other picture to illustrate another Farley story except this diagram from a time machine patent.
The Revenge of the Great White Lodge
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: first two chapters in The Omnibus of Time, 1950
Farley published the first 5500 words of this unfinished novel in his 1950 collection, The Omnibus of Time, but he never finished the partly autobiographical book about a New Hampshire lawyer, Lincoln Houghton, who follows an apparent time traveler to a cult compound before being transported to an alternate reality.

 As to the advice which I promised you. Watch your cousin warren, so far as Katherine is concerned!—Now you have a real reason to dislike your cousin. 

[Mar 2015]
The story also appeared in this 1978 anthology.
“The Man Who Could Turn Back the Clock”
by Ralph Milne Farley
First publication: The Omnibus of Time, 1950
After a night in an isolated barn with a seductive woman, a man tries to explain his absence to his wife. It could be that Farley invented the choose-your-own-ending-story with this short parable.

 Then the man saw that he had made a tactical mistake; so he turned back the clock a few minutes and tried the conversation over again. 

[Mar 2015]

“Spectator Sport”
by John D. MacDonald
First publication: Thrilling Wonder Stories, Feb 1950
Dr. Rufus Maddon is the first man to travel 400 years into the future, but those he meets think he’s in need of treatment.

 Every man can have Temp and if you save your money you can have Permanent, which they say, is as close to heaven as man can get. 

[Apr 2012]

“The Wheel of Time”
by Robert Arthur, Jr.
First publication: Super Science Stories, Mar 1950
Decades before that other Robert wrote of his Wheel of Time, Robert Arthur gave us this story of his recurring mad scientist Jeremiah Jupiter and his long-suffering assistant Lucius. This time, Jupiter plans to create a time machine from oranges, The Encyclopedia Britannica, bass drums, tiny motorcycles, and three trained chimps.

 I am going to set up an interference in the time rhythm at this particular spot. Then the chimpanzies will enter it with my time capsules—since I know you won’t— and they will deposit the capules here a million years ago! 

[Apr 2012]

2000 Plus
created by Sherman H. Dreyer and Robert Weenolsen
First time travel: 27 Apr 1950


After World War II, the American public became fascinated with science, scientists and the future, one result of which were the national science fiction anthology radio shows starting with 2000 Plus. There was no limit to the scientific wonders that we would have by the year 2000! The series had at least two time-travel episodes in its two-year run or original scripts (and possibly a third, “Time Out of Hand”).

 The Man Who Conquered Time (12 Apr 1950)to 10,000 AD 
The Temple of the Pharaohs (12 Jul 1951)to ancient Egypt

 The sky, the sky is wrong, Sebastian! The constellations are all twisted up. Halley’s comet is back where it must have been a few thousand years ago! Sebastion, I’ve got it! That sky! That sky is the sky of about 5000 years ago! 
—from “The Temple of the Pharaohs”

[Jan 2012]




#11 of 50 hand-colored Frazetta prints of Weird Science-Fantasy 29

EC Comics (Anthologies)
First time travel: May 1950


The prototypical comic book weird story anthologies were EC’s titles that began in April 1950 with Crypt of Terror. I don’t know whether that title and EC’s other horror comics had any time travel (because I was forbidden from reading those!), but Harry Harrison, Wally Wood and their fellow artists managed some in the titles that were more geared to sf.

I’m aiming for a complete list of EC’s time-travel vignettes, but the list as of now is only partial. The first one I found was in Weird Fantasy #13 (May/Jun 1950), which was actually its first issue. That was part of a ruse to take over a second-class postage permit from A Moon, a Girl...Romance (which ended with #12). They stuck with that numbering through the fifth issue (#17) when the postmaster general took note, and the next one was #6. I did kinda wonder how many of those romance readers were surprised when Weird Fantasy #13 showed up in their mailboxes.

There was a sister title, Weird Science, which began in May/Jun 1952 with #12 (taking over the postage permit after the 11th issue of Saddle Romance). It had many time travel stories, starting with “Machine from Nowhere” in #14 (the 3rd issue).

Weird Science and Weird Fantasy were not selling that well, so EC combined them into a single title—Weird Science-Fantasy—with #23 in March 1954. Alas, there was but one time-travel story, “The Pioneer” in #24 (Jun 1954), about which EC’s site says A man attempts to be the first to successfully time travel, but there are some casualties on the way....
By the way, the whole run of EC comics would be 4 stars, but it gets an extra ½ star because of Al Williamson’s adaptation of “The Sound of Thunder” in Weird Science-Fantasy #24 and the beautiful Frank Frazetta cover on the final issue (#29) of Weird Science-Fantasy. The third image to the left is is that Frazetta did of that cover in 1972, with a bonus vamp in the bottom right corner. The cover had a gladiator fighting cave men, but it was not a time-travel story.

In 1955, the Comics Code Authority banned the word “Weird,” so the title became Incredible Science Fiction with #30 (Jul/Aug 1955). The four-issue run had only one time-travel tale (“Time to Leave” by Roy G. Krenkel in #31).

 I just stepped off the path, that’s all. Got a little mud on my shoes! What do you want me to do, get down and pray? 

[Circa 1963]

“Night Meeting”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: in The Martian Chronicles, May 1950

On his own in the Martian night, Tómas Gomez meets an ancient Martian whom he can talk with but not touch.

 How can you prove who is from the Past, who from the Future? 

[Nov 1973]

“The Fox and the Forest”
aka "To the Future"
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Collier’s, 13 May 1950

Roger Kristen and his wife decide to take a time-travel vacation and then run so they’ll never have to return to the war torn world of 2155 AD.

 The inhabitants of the future resent you two hiding on a tropical isle, as it were, while they drop off the cliff into hell. Death loves death, not life. Dying people love to know that others die with them. It is a comfort to learn you are not alone in the kiln, in the grave. I am the guardian of their collective resentment against you two. 

[Jan 2012]

Dimension X
created by Fred Wiehe and Edward King
First time travel: 27 May 1950



In the month that Collier’s ran its first time-travel story, Dimension X broadcast the same story with an original adaptation. I found just one later story of time-travel in their 46-episode run. (They also did an abbreviated Pebble in the Sky, but without Joseph Schwartz’s time travel.)

 To the Future (27 May 1950)from war in 2155 to peaceful 1950s 
Time and Time Again (12 Jul 1951)dying soldier to his childhood)

 We have Time Machines for sale—simple little machines of paper and ink, tubes and wires that, coupled with your own mind can soar down the years of
Eternity.
 
—from a Dimension X advertisement

[Jan 2012]

“Time in Thy Flight”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Fantastic Universe, Jun/Jul 1950
Mr. Fields takes Janet, Robert and William back to 1928 to study their strange ways.

 And those older people seated with the children. Mothers, fathers, they called them. Oh, that was strange. 

[Dec 2013]

“The Little Black Bag”
by C.M. Kornbluth
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Jul 1950


In a 25th century where the vast majority of people have stunted intelligence (or at least talk with poor grammar), a physicist accidentally sends a medical bag back through time to Dr. Bayard Full, a down-on-his-luck, generally drunk, always callously self-absorbed, dog-kicking shyster. Despite falling in with a guttersnipe of a girl, Annie Aquella, he tries to make good use of the gift.

 Switch is right. It was about time travel. What we call travel through time. So I took the tube numbers he gave me and I put them into the circuit-builder; I set it for ‘series’ and there it is-my time-traveling machine. It travels things through time real good. 

[May 2015]

“Vengeance, Unlimited”
aka "Vengeance Fleet"
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Super Science Stories, Jul 1950
After Venus is destroyed by an invading fleet, Earth and Mars end their dispute in order to put together a fleet that can travel back in time to extract vengeance on the invaders. I like Brown’s work a lot, but not this story which had gaping holes, not the least of which was a problem with the units of c raised to the c power (sorry, that is one of my pet peeves.

 In ten years, traveling forward in space and backward in time, the fleet would have traversed just that distance—186,334186,334 miles. 

[Jan 2014]

“Time’s Arrow”
by Arthur C. Clarke
First publication: Science-Fantasy, Summer 1950

Barton and Davis, assistants to Professor Fowler, are on an archaeological dig when a physicist sets up camp next door and speculates abound about viewing into the past...or is it only viewing?

 The discovery of negative entropy introduces quite new and revolutionary conceptions into our picture of the physical world. 

[Dec 2008]

Operation Peril’s Time Travelers
created by Richard Hughes
First publication: Operation Peril 1, Oct/Nov 1950


Before it became a war comic, the first twelve issues of ACG’s Operation Peril included a regular series about Dr. Tom Redfield and his rich fiancé, Peggy, who buy some of Nostradamus’s papers and discover that he’d designed a time machine.

I haven’t found difinitive information on the creators of this series. Several sites name ACG editor Richard E. Hughes as the writer; some places speculate that it was drawn by Ken Bald, but Pappy’s Golden Age Blog indicates that a reader names Lin Streeter as the actual artist, and Pappy agrees.

 Why, what an odd-looking blueprint! Tempus Machina--why, Tom! That’s Latin for Time Machine! 

[Apr 2014]

Time and Again
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Oct/Nov/Dec 1950
After twenty years, Ash Sutton reurns in a cracked-up ship without food, air or water—only to report that the mysterious planet that nobody can visit is no threat to Earth. But a man from the future insists that Sutton must be killed to stop a war in time; while Sutton himself, who has developed metaphysical, religious leanings, finds a copy of This Is Destiny, the very book that he is planning to write.

 It would reach back to win its battles. It would strike at points in time and space which would not even know that thre was a war. It could, logically, go back to the silver mines of Athens, to the horse and chariot of Thutmosis III, to the sailing of Columbus. 

[May 2012]

“The Third Level”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Collier’s, 7 Oct 1950


A New York man stumbles upon a third underground level at Grand Central Station which is a portal to the past.

This is the first of Finney’s many fine time-travel stories.

 I turned toward the ticket windows knowing that here—on the third level at Grand Central—I could buy tickets that would take Louisa and me anywhere in the United States we wanted to go. In the year 1894. 

[Mar 2005]

“Day of the Hunters”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Future Science Fiction, Nov 1950

A midwestern professor tells a half-drunken story of time travel and the real cause of the dinosaur extinction.

 Because I built a time machine for myself a couple of years ago and went back to the Mesozoic Era and found out what happened to the dinosaurs. 

[Jul 1976]

“Transfer Point”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Nov 1950

Vyrko, the Last Man on Earth, is confined to a shelter with the beautiful but unalluring scientist’s daughter Lavra, until he starts reading a stash of old pulp magazines with stories that exactly describe himself and Lavra.

 Good old endless-cycle gimmick. Lot of fun to kick around but Bob Heinlein did it once and for all in ‘By His Bootstraps.’ Damnedest tour de force I ever read; there just aren’t any switcheroos left after that. 

[Jan 2013]

Ziff-Davis Comics (Anthologies)
founded by William B. Ziff, Sr. and Beranrd G. Davis
First time travel: Amazing Adventures 1, Nov 1950


Ziff-Davis published dozens of comic book titles in the first half of the 1950s including some anthologies of weird stories. The first issue of their Amazing Adventures included a time-travel tale called “Treaspasser in Time” in which the hero and the professor go through a strange fourth dimension full of inverted coneheads.

 We’re obviously stranded in the fourth dimension... We’ve both escaped that monster by plunging into the color-stream...which must be the stream of time! 

[Jun 2012]

“A Stone and a Spear”
by Raymond F. Jones
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Dec 1950
In a post-Hiroshima world, Dr. Dell resigns from a weapons lab to farm, and when Dr. Curtis Johnson visits to pursuade him to come back, he finds that Dell’s reasons are linked to time travel.

 Here within this brain of mine has been conceived a thing which will probably destroy a billion human lives in the coming years. D. triconus toxin in a suitable aerosol requires only a countable number of molecules in the lungs of a man to kill him. My brain and mine alone is responsible for that vicious, murderous discovery. 

[Apr 2012]

“Such Interesting Neighbors”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Collier’s, 6 Jan 1951


Al Lewis and his wife Nell have new neighbors, an inventor who talks of time travel from the future and his wife Ann.

The story was the basis for the second episode of Science Fiction Theater and also Spielberg’s Amazing Stories.

 But Ann walked straight into that door and fell. I couldn’t figure out how she came to do it; it was as though she expected the door to open by itself or something. That’s what Ted said, too, going over to help her up. “Be careful, honey,” he said, and laughed a little, making a joke of it. “You’ll have to learn, you know, that doors won’t open themselves.” 

[Mar 2005]

“...and It Comes Out Here”
by Lester del Rey
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Feb 1951
Old Jerome Boell, inventor of the household atomic power unit, visits his young self to make sure that the household atomic power unit gets invented, so to speak.

 But it’s a longish story, and you might as well let me in. You will, you know, so why quibble about it? At least, you always have—or do—or will. I don’t know, verbs get all mixed up. We don’t have the right attitude toward tenses for a situation like this. 

[Apr 2012]

Atlas Comics (Anthologies)
First time travel: Astonishing 6, Apr 1951


Before they started slinging superheroes, Stan Lee and the bullpen were working at Marvel’s predecessor, Atlas Comics, putting out comics that mimicked EC’s anthologies. The first one I found was in Astonishing 6 (Apr 1951). As I find others, I’ll list them on my time-travel comics page.

 Of course! that’s it! I forgot to connect the plug to the electric outlet! 
—Harry in Mystery Tales 10, Apr 1953, explaining why his time machine did’s work the first time

[circa 1962]

Lights Out
created by Fred Coe
First time travel: 2 Jul 1951



I wonder whether Lights Out was the earliest sf anthology tv show and the earliest time travel on tv? The first four episodes were live broadcasts on New York’s WNBT-TV (NBC) starting on 3 Jun 1946. It was renewed by NBC for three seasons of national broadcast starting 26 Jul 1949, and I spotted at least two time-travel episodes. Some episodes have found their way to Youtube, although I watched “And Adam Beget” on Disk 5 of the Netflix offering. I haven’t yet listened to any of the earlier radio broadcasts.

The episode “And Adam Beget” came from a 1939 radio episode of Arch Oboler’s Plays, and it formed the basis for a 1953 Steve Ditko story, “A Hole in His Head,” in the Black Magic comic book.

 And Adam Begot (2 Jul 1951)time warp to prehistoric past 
Of Time and Third Avenue (30 Dec 1951)from Bester’s story

 You don’t understand. Look at the short, hairy, twisted body—the neck bent, the head thrust forward, those enormous brows, the short flat nose... 
—from And Adam Begot

[Apr 2012]

Youthful Magazines
founded by Bill Friedman and Sophie Friedman
First time travel: Captain Science 5, Aug 1951


From 1949 through 1954, the Friedman’s Youthful Magazines published ten distinct comic book titles. The first time travel I spotted was in Captain Science 5, where the brainy captain takes yourthful teen Rip and redheaded bombshell Luana to Pluto at 40 times the speed of light to fight villians from the future. As I find other Youthful time travel, I’ll add it to my time-travel comics page.

 Yes. Let’s see. Infinity over pi minus the two quadrants cubed... 
—from Captain Science 5

[Jun 2012]

“Quit Zoomin’ Those Hands Through the Air”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Collier’s, 4 Aug 1951

Grandpa is over 100 now, so surely his promise to General Grant no longer binds him to keep quiet about a time-travel expedition and a biplane.

 Air power in the Civil War? Well, It’s been a pretty well-kept secret all these years, but we had it. The Major and me invented it ourselves. 

[May 2011]

“The Biography Project”
by H.L. Gold (as by Dudley Dell)
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Sep 1951
Many sf stories are called upon to provide one-way viewing of the past with no two-way interference, but few (not this one) will answer.

 There were 1,000 teams of biographers, military analysts, historians, etc., to begin recording history as it actually happened—with special attention, according to Maxwell’s grant, to past leaders of industry, politics, science, and the arts, in the order named. 

[Jul 2013]

“I’m Scared”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Collier’s, 15 Sep 1951

A retired man investigates scores of cases of the past impinging itself on the present and speculates about the cause and the eventual effect.

 Then, undressing in my bedroom, I remembered that Major Bowes was dead. Years had passed, half a decade, since that dry chuckle and familiar, “All right, all right,” had been heard in the nation’s living rooms. 

[Mar 2005]

“Of Time and Third Avenue”
by Alfred Bester
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct 1951

Apparently, time travel has rules. For example, you cannot go back and simply take something from the past—it must be given to you. Thus, our man from the future must talk young Oliver Wilson Knight and his girlfriend into giving up the 1990 almanac that they bought in 1950.

 If there was such a thing as a 1990 almanac, and if it was in that package, wild horses couldn’t get it away from me. 

[Apr 2012]





Walt Disney Comic Books
First time travel: Mickey Mouse daily strips, 22 Oct 1951
The first mention of time travel that I’ve found for Disney characters in the comics was the story of Uncle Wombat’s Tock Tock Time Machine which ran in Mickey’s daily strip from 22 Oct 1951 through 19 Jan 1952. As for comic books, the first one that I ever read in the comic books was when Mickey and Goofy traveled back to Blackbeard in August, 1968. I’ve since found travel in the comic books as early as 1964 (Gyro Gearloose travels in Uncle Scrooge 50) and 1962 (Chip ’n’ Dale 30). I’ll keep looking and add any new finds to my time-travel comic book page.

 A fantastic time machine enables Mickey and Goofy to live in different periods of history. Right now they are aboard Mickey’s unarmed merchant vessel off the Carolinas in the early 1700’s—and off to starboard is a treacherous pirate ship... 
Mickey Mouse 114

[Jul 1968]

I’ll Never Forget You
aka The House in the Square, aka Man of Two Worlds
adapted by Ranald MacDougall
First release: 7 Dec 1951


John Balderston’s play Berkeley Square is updated to the 1950s where Peter Standish, now an atomic scientist, is once again transported back to the 18th century (unfortunately, not via a nuclear accident) to romance beautiful Kate Petigrew.

 Roger, I believe the 18th century still exists. It’s all around us, if only we could find it. Put it this way: Polaris, the North Star, is very bright, yet its light takes nearly fifty years to reach us. For all we know, Polaris may have ceased to exist somewhere around 1900. Yet we still see it, its past is our present. As far as Polaris is concerned, Teddy Roosevelt is just going down San Juan hill. 

[Mar 2015]

“Pawley’s Peepholes”
by John Wyndham
First publication: Science-Fantasy, Winter 1951-52
Jerry, his girl Sally, and everyone else in the quiet town of Westwich are forced to put up with gawking but immaterial tourists from the future who glide by on sight-seeing platforms.

 Was Great Grandma as Good as She Made Out? See the Things Your Family History Never Told You 

[Jul 2013]

Mighty Mouse Cartoons
created by Izzy Klein and Paul Terry
First time travel: 28 Dec 1951


Mighty Mouse saved the day many a time, so doubtlessly he has saved the day in many other times, too, but so far I’ve seen only one such episode (“Prehistoric Perils”, 1952) in which our mouse goes in our villian’s machine back to the dinosaurs to save Pearl Pureheart.

 And now, my little papoose, I shall take you off in my time machine. 

[Dec 2011]

“The Choice”
by W. Hilton-Young (published anonymously)
First publication: Punch, 19 Mar 1952

In this short-short story (about 200 words), our hero, Williams, goes to the future and returns with the memory of only one small thing.

 How did it happen? Can you remember nothing at all? 

[Apr 2012]

“The Business, as Usual”
by Mack Reynolds
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1952

A time traveler from the 20th century has only 15 minutes to negotiate a trade for an artifact to prove that he’s been to the 30th century.

 “Look, don’t you get it? I’m a time traveler. They picked me to send to the future. I’m important.”
   “Ummm. But you must realize that we have time travelers turning up continuously these days.”
 

[Jan 2012]

“Sound of Thunder”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Colliers, 28 Jun 1952



Eckels, a wealthy hunter, is one of three hunters on a prehistoric hunt for T. Rex conducted by Time Safari, Inc.

This was not the first speculation on small changes in the past causing big changes now (for example, Tenn’s “Me, Myself, and I”), but I wonder whether this was the first time that sensitive dependence on initial conditions was expressed in terms of a single butterfly.

 Not a little thing like that! Not a butterfly! 

[May 2003]

“Star, Bright”
by Mark Clifton
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Jul 1952


Pete Holmes knows that Star, his three-year-old girl, is bright, and he worries that being so intelligent will make life difficult for her (as it has for himself); and then when an equally bright boy moves in next door and Pete observes them playing together and dropping an impossibly ancient Egyptian coin, he’s not sure whether that makes the situation better or worse.

 And those were the children who were too little to cross the street! 

[Feb 2015]

“Hobson’s Choice”
by Alfred Bester
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1952
By night, Addyer dreams of traveling to different times; by day, he is a statistician investigating an anomalous increase in the country’s population centered right in the part of the country that took the heaviest radiation damage in the war.

 Either he imagined himself moved backward in time with a double armful of Encyclopedia Britannica, best-sellers, hit plays and gambling records; or else he imagined himself transported forward in time a thousand years to the Golden Age of perfection. 

[Jan 2015]

Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies Comic Books
First time travel: Bugs Bunny 50, Aug 1952

No doubt that the bunny and his friends have often traveled through time in the pages of four colors with many titles published by Dell/Gold Key/Whitman. The first such possible escapade that I’ve seen was a story called “Fiddling with the Future” in Bugs Bunny 50 in which some gypsy friends of Bugs can read the future.

 We saw you reading the future with it over at the carnival! 


“There Is a Tide”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Collier’s, 2 Aug 1952

A sleepless man, struggling with a business decision, sees an earlier occupant of his apartment who is struggling with a decision of his own.

 I saw the ghost in my own living room, alone, between three and four in the morning, and I was there, wide awake, for a perfectly sound reason: I was worrying. 

[May 2011]

“The Entrepreneur”
by Thomas Wilson
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1952
Ivan Smithov, an upstanding U.S. Communist from the year 2125, is charged with making arrangements for a team of three entrepreneurs to visit the U.S. in 1953 to make preparations for a time tourist enterprise—but Ivan runs into problems procuring local currency for the expedition from the Soviet embassy of the time until his companions’ behavior draws enough attention that the ambassador begins to believe him. But what other consequences might their goings-on have?

 Mrat-See turned quickly, wincing at the protest of his aching muscles. The creature standing before him might have issued from a nightmare. Its heavy, barrellike body was slung like a hammock on four bowed legs. The enormous head, with undershot jaw, protruding fangs, and pendulous lips, was turned toward him unswervingly, and the continuing growl was a deep rumble of menace from the massive chest. Mrat-See’s heart leaped with fear. He had seen such creatures before in the Yorkgrad zoo. Dogs they were called. 

[May 2015]

“Bring the Jubilee”
by Ward Moore
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Nov 1952
In a world where the South won the “War for Southron Independence,” Hodge Backmaker, a northern country bumpkin with academic leanings, makes his way to New York City where he becomes disillusioned, ponders the notions of time and free will, and eventually goes to a communal think-tank where time travel offers him the chance to visit the key Gettysburg battle of the war.

 I could say that time is an illusion and that all events occur simultaneously. 

[Dec 2013]

Bring the Jubilee
by Ward Moore
First publication: 1953

The novella version of this story appeared first, but I don’t know which was written first. Both are well worth reading, but my preference is for the novella which tells the same story in a more direct fashion.

 I could say that time is a convention and that all events occur simultaneously. 

[Dec 2013]

Operation Freedom
First publication: Six issues circa 1953
A group called the Institute of Fiscal and Political Education published a series of at least six giveaway comic books to extol the virtues of America and democracy. Some were printed with blue and red ink with nice halftones, and others were black and white. I don’t know many details, but Lone Star Comics says that Joshua Strong goes back in time to explain issues such as the right to free speech and press (in issue #5).

 We must never forget our rights are based on our FAITH IN GOD. We claim them in Jefferson’s words, Not under the charters of kinds or legislatures, but under the King of Kings. 
—from the first issue

[Jun 2012]
Button Gwinnett plays the title role in this story.
“Button, Button”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Startling Stories, Jan 1953
Harry Smith has an eccentric scientist uncle who needs to make some money from his astonishing invention that can bring one gram of material from the past.

 Do you remember the time a few weeks back when all of upper Manhattan and the Bronx were without electricity for twelve hours because of the damndest overload cut-off in the main power board? I won’t say we did that, because I am in no mood to be sued for damages. But I will say this: The electricity went off when my uncle Otton turned the third knob. 

[Jul 1976]

“Time Bum”
by C.M. Kornbluth
First publication: Fantastic, Jan/Feb 1953

After a con man reads a lurid science fiction magazine, a man who’s quite apparently out-of-time shows up to rent a furnished bungalow from Walter Lacblan.

 Esperanto isn’t anywhere. It’s an artificial language. I played around with it a little once. It was supposed to end war and all sorts of things. Some people called it the language of the future. 

[May 2015]

“Who’s Cribbing”
by Jack Lewis
First publication: Startling Stories, Jan 1953

Jack Lewis finds that all his story submissions are being returned to him with accusations of plagiarizing the great, late Todd Thromberry, but Lewis has another explanation.

 Dear Mr. Lewis,
   We think you should consult a psychiatrist.
Sincerely,
Doyle P. Gates
Science Fiction Editor
Deep Space Magazine
 

[Jan 2012]

“Dominoes”
by C.M. Kornbluth
First publication: Star Science Fiction Stories, Feb 1953
Stock broker W.J. Born jumps two years into the future to find out when the big crash is coming.

 A two-year forecast on the market was worth a billion! 

[Apr 2012]

“Death Ship”
by Richard Matheson
First publication: Fantastic Story Magazine, Mar 1953

This story is in The Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century, so it’s gotta have time travel, right? For me, though, it was a Flying Dutchman story with the heroes’ ghosts visiting their own crash site in normal time fashion, and at the end of the Twilight Zone version, the ghosts appear to be in a time loop, doomed to repeated visits to the same crash site without necessarily traveling through time.

 Nothing from Ross. Nothing from any of them then but stares and shuddering breaths.
    Because the twisted bodies on the floor were theirs, all three of them.
    And all three...dead.
 

[Jul 2011]

“The Old Die Rich”
by H.L. Gold
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Mar 1953

Dang those drop-dead beautiful, naked redheads with a gun and a time machine! How did actor Mark Weldon start out investigating the starvation deaths of rich, old vagrants and end up at the wrong end of a derringer being forced into a time machine invented by Miss Robert’s mad scientist father?

 She had the gun in her hand. I went into the mesh cage, not knowing what to expect and yet too afraid of her to refuse. I didn’t want to wind up dead of starvation, no matter how much money she gave me—but I didn”t want to get shot, either. 

[Jan 2012]

“The Other Inauguration”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Mar 1953
Usually, when I start a story, I already know whether it has time travel in the plot, but occassionally I’m surprised when the temporal antics arise, as in this story of Peter Lanroyd’ attempt to change the outcome of a presidental election that’s stolen by an ideologue. (No, no—not the year 2000. This is a fictional tale.)

I first read this story during my ice-climbing trip to Ouray with Tim.

 To any man even remotely interested in politics, let alone one as involved as I am, every 1st Tue of every 4th Nov must seem like one of the crucial if-points of history. 

[Jan 2013]

“Infinite Intruder”
by Alan E. Nourse
First publication: Space Science Fiction, Jul 1953

Since the 4-day atomic war of 2078, Roger Strang has been working on the Barrier Project to build an electronic barrier against missles, but now someone is trying to kill his 12-year-old son with attacks that seemingly succeed but don’t, while any records of his own background have been erased, as if he had never even lived, at least not in the 21st century. As a bonus, the story also has a grandfather paradox.

 The theory said that a man returning through time could alter the social and technological trends of the people and times to which he returned, in order to change history that was already past. 

[May 2012]

ACE Comics
published by Aaron A. Wyn and Rose Wyn
First time travel: Baffling Mysteries 18, Nov 1953


Ace Comics published a couple dozen anthology comic titles between 1940 and 1956. The only time travel that I’ve spotted so far was in Baffling Mysteries 18.

 I am Chronos, the spirit of time! Do not destroy the sacred sun dial! Come closer and I shall initiate you into the mysteries of time which you pursue so hotly. 

[Jun 2012]

Black Magic
edited by Jack Kirby and Joe Simon
First time travel: Black Magic #27, Nov 1953



Simon and Kirby put together the Black Magic horror comic for Prize Comics in the fifties, and there was at least one time-travel story, “A Hole in His Head” by none other than an early Steve Ditko. That story was based on a 1951 tv episode of Lights Out (“And Adam Begot”) written by Arch Oboler and taken from the 1939 radio show Arch Oboler’s Plays.

 Somehow we have stepped out of our own time into another. 
—from “A Hole in His Head”

[Apr 2012]

“Hall of Mirrors”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Dec 1953
You have invented a time machine of sorts that can, at any time, replace yourself with an exact duplicate of your body—and mind—from any time in the past.

 They didn’t use that style of furniture in Los Angeles—or anywhere else that you know of—in 1954. That thing over there in the corner—you can’t even guess what it is. So might your grandfather, at your age, have looked at a television. 

[Jul 2011]

“Anachron”
by Damon Knight
First publication: If, Jan 1954

Brother Number One invents a machine that can extract things and place things in elsewhen, but only if the acts don’t interfere with free will; Brother Number Two tries to steal the machine.

 “By God and all the saints,” he said. “Time travel.”
    Harold snorted impatiently. “My dear Peter, ‘time’ is a meaningless word taken by itself, just as ‘space’ is.”
    “But barring that, time travel.”
    “If you like, yes.”
 

[Jul 2011]

“Experiment”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Feb 1954

Professor Johnson’s colleagues wonder what would happen if he refuses to send an object back to the past after it has already appeared there.

I haven’t found anything earlier that brings up this question, but although the resolution was clever, it didn’t satisfy me, and (though I could be wrong) I think Brown misses the fact that at one point there should be two copies of the object in existence at the same time. In any case, this was the first part of a pair of short-short stories in the Feb ’54 Galaxy, which together were called Two-Timer (the second of which had no time travel).

 What if, now that it has already appeared five minutes before you place it there, you should change your mind about doing so and not place it there at three o’clock? Wouldn’t there be a paradox of some sort involved? 

[Jan 2012]

The Haertel Scholium Stories
by James Blish
First story: Galaxy Science Fiction, Feb 1954

Blish’s story “Beep” appeared in 1954 with a casual mention of time-travel when a message is overheard from a future spaceship that’s following a worldline backwards through time. The main story follows video reporter Dana Lje who stumbles upon the newly invented Dirac radio which allows instantaneous communication and, as only she realizes, also carries a record of every transmission ever made, both past and future.

At Larry Shaw’s request, Blish expanded “Beep” into the short novel The Quincunx of Time, and both these stories share a background wherein the work of Dolph Haertel (the next Einstein) provides an ftl-drive (the Haertel Overdrive, later called the Imaginary Drive), an antigravity device (the spindizzy), and an instantaneous communicator (the Dirac Radio). I read many of these in the early ’70s, but can’t find my notes and don’t remember any other time travel beyond that one communiqué that Lje overheard. Still, I’ll list everything in The Haertel Scholium and reread them some day!

 Pantropy and Seedling Stars stories (1942-1956)Various publications 
Cities in Flight stories (1952-1962)Various publications
Common Time (Jul 1953)in Shadow of Tomorrow
Beep (Feb 1954)Galaxy
Nor Iron Bars (Nov 1957)Infinity
A Case of Conscience (Sep 1953) & novel (1958)If
A Dusk of Idols (Mar 1961)Amazing
Midsummer Century (Apr 1972) & novel (May 1972)F&SF

 It is instead one of the seven or eight great philosophical questions that remain unanswered, the problem of whether man has or has not free will. 

[circa 1974]

“The Immortal Bard”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Universe Science Fiction, May 1954


Dr. Phineas Welch tells an English professor a disturbing story about a matter of temperal transference and a student in the professor’s Shakespeare class.

 I did. I needed someone with a universal mind; someone who knew people well enough to be able to live with them centuries way from his own time. Shakespeare was the man. I’ve got his signature. As a memento, you know. 

[Jul 1976]

“Where the World is Quiet”
by Henry Kuttner (as by C.H. Liddell)
First publication: Fantastic Universe, May 1954

This story appears in an issue of Fantastic Stories with a remarkable lineup including Frank Belknap Long, Philip José Farmer, Jack Williamson, Philip K. Dick, Richard Matheson, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and Robert Bloch. As for Kuttner’s contribution, a crippled priest enlists the aid of an adventurous anthropologist, Señor White, to track the fate of seven young girls who disappeared into the Cordilleras of eastern Peru in the direction of the great peak, Hauscan. Do anthropologists know anything about time-slips? (Yes, just a slight time-travel connection.)

 So, even now I do not know all that lay behind the terror in that Peruvian valley. This much I learned: the Other, like Lhar and her robot, had been cast adrift by a time-slip, and thus marooned here. There was no way for it to return to its normal Time-sector. It had created the fog-wall to protect itself from the direct rays of the sun, which threatened its existence. 

[May 2015]

“Something for Nothing”
by Robert Sheckley
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Jun 1954

A wishing machine (aka Class-A Utilizer, Series AA-1256432) appears in Joe Collins’ bedroom along with a warning that this machine should be used only by Class-A ratings!

 In rapid succession, he asked for five million dollars, three functioning oil wells, a motion-picture studio, perfect health, twenty-five more dancing girls, immortality, a sports car and a herd of pedigreed cattle. 

[Jan 2012]

“Breakfast at Twilight”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: Amazing Stories, Jul 1954


Tim McLean’s ordinary family awakens on an ordinary day to find themselves in a war zone seven years in the future.

 We fought in Korea. We fought in China. In Germany and Yugoslavia and Iran. It spread, farther and farther. Finally the bombs were falling here. It came like the plague. The war grew. It didn’t begin. 

[Jan 2012]

“This Is the Way the World Ends”
by H.W. Johnson
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Aug 1954
Living in a world threatened by nuclear extinction, seven-year-old Tommy receives the current and future thoughts of animals and people.

 There isn’t going to be anything. It’s all black after tomorrow. 

[Dec 2012]

“The Easy Way”
by Oscar A. Boch
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Sep 1954
Hal Thomas’s wife thinks that he doesn’t pay enough attention to his children, one of whom is building an antigravity/time machine upstairs and the other of whom doesn’t need the machine to move through space and time.

 Space-time—is cute? 

[Dec 2012]

“Meddler”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: Future Science Fiction, Oct 1954


A government project sends a Time Dip into the future just to observe whether their actions have turned out well, but subsequent observations show that the act the observing has somehow eliminated mankind, so Hasten (the world’s most competent histo-researcher) must now go forward to find out what caused the lethal factor.

 We sent the Dip on ahead, at fifty year leaps. Nothing. Nothing each time. Cities, roads, buildings, but no human life. Everyone dead. 

[Jan 2012]

Cave Girl
by Bob Powell
First time travel: Cave Girl 14, Dec 1954

Cave Girl had four issues of jungle adventures (#11 to #14), and the last one had a strange machine that made dead people come to life by sending them into their own past, but keeping them in the present moment. In the end, the machine sends itself into the far past and disappears from the present.

The comic was published by Magazine Enterprises, which published from 1944 to 1958. So far, this Cave Girl is the only time travel I’ve spotted, though I do have one of their Teena issues in my dad’s stash of comics.

 Men in strange garb appear. It seems that they unfasten the machine and take it away. Actually they are setting up the machine, but since time is running backwards—so do they! 

[Jun 2012]

The End of Eternity
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: 1955

Andrew Harlan, Technician in the everwhen of Eternity, falls in love and starts a chain of events that can mean the end of everything.

 He had boarded the kettle in the 575th Century, the base of operations assigned to him two years earlier. At the time the 575th had been the farthest upwhen he had ever traveled. Now he was moving upwhen to the 2456th Century. 

[Apr 1968]

“The Past Master”
by Robert Bloch
First publication: Bluebook, Jan 1955

In a United States on the verge of atomic war with the Communists, a handsome, naked man—call him John Smith”walks out of the ocean with a bag full of money and, according to eyewitnesses, a mind to buy the Mona Lisa and a long list of other masterpieces.

 Then he began writing titles. I’m afraid I gasped. “Really,” I said. “You can’t actually expect to buy the ‘Mona Lisa’!” 

[Feb 2015]

“Blood”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Feb 1955

A cute joke story about the last two vampires on Earth who flee into the future to escape persecution and simply search for a filling meal.

 I, a member of the dominant race, was once what you called... 

[Jul 2013]

“The Dragon”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Mar 1955

On a dark night on a moor, 900 years after the nativity, two knights face down a steaming behemoth.

 It was a fog inside of a mist inside of a darkness, and this place was no man’s place and there was no year or hour at all, but only these men in a faceless emptiness of sudden frost, storm, and white thunder which moved behind the great falling pane of green glass that was the lightning. 

[Dec 2013]

“Project Mastodon”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Mar 1955

Wes Adams, Johnny Cooper and Chuck Hudson (chums since boyhood) build a time machine and proceed to do exactly what you or I would do: Go back 150,000 years, found the new Republic of Mastodonia somewhere in pre-Wisconsin, and seek diplomatic recognition from the United States of America.

 If you guys ever travel in time, you’ll run up against more than you bargain for. I don’t mean the climate or the terrain or the fauna, but the economics and the politics. 

[Jan 2012]

“Target One”
by Frederik Pohl
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Apr 1955
Thirty-five years after the death of Albert Einstean, atomic bombs have left 2 billion corpses; the bombs came from Einstein’s formulae; so what is it we need?

I had the good fortune to meet Fred Pohl in July of 2003 at Jim Gunn's workshop in Manhattan, Kansas. On a warm day outside the student union building, he kindly sat and talked to me about the background for a story I was writing about him and Asimov.

 Quite simply, it is the murder of Albert Einstein. 

[Feb 2012]

Science Fiction Theater
aka Beyond the Limits (reruns)
created by Ivan Tors
First time travel: 15 Apr 1955


I’ve seen only the second episode, “Time Is Just a Place” (in color!), in which a happy 1950s couple (one of whom is Mr. B from Hazel—did she ever time travel?) get new neighbors who have escaped from the future. The episode was based on a 1951 Jack Finney story, “Such Interesting Neighbors.”

 Nothing to get excited about. Any housewife could use one. 
—the interesting neighbor talking about his sonic broom

[Sep 2011]



Adventures of Superman
created by Whitney Ellsworth and Robert J. Maxwell
First time travel: 23 Apr 1955


In the first episode of Season 3, “Through the Time Barrier” (23 Mar 1955), Professor Twiddle’s time machine takes the staff of the Daily Planet back to prehistoric times. I don’t know whether there was any other time travel.

 Faster than a speeding bullet! More powerful than a locomotive! Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound! Look—up in the sky! It’s a bird! t’s a plane! It’s Superman!

Yes, it’s Superman, strange visitor from another planet who came to Earth with powers and abilities far beyond those of mortal men. Superman, who can change the course of mighty rivers, bend steel in his bare hands, and who—disguised as Clark Kent, mild-mannored reporter for a great metropolitan newspaper—fights a never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way!
 

[circa 1966]

“Sam, This Is You”
by Murray Leinster
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, May 1955

While up on a pole, lineman Sam Yoder gets a call from his future self who proceeds to tell him exactly what to do, even if is suspiciously criminal and it makes his girl, Rosie, furious.

 You’ve heard of time-traveling. Well, this is time-talking. You’re talking to yourself—that’s me—and I’m talking to myself—that’s you—and it looks like we’ve got a mighty good chance to get rich. 

[Jun 2012]





The Time Patrol Stories
by Poul Anderson
First story: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, May 1955

Former military engineer Manse Everard is recruited by the Time Patrol to prevent time travelers from making major changes to history (history bounces back from the small stuff).

For me, the logic of these stories pushes in a good direction, but still leaves one gaping hole that’s evinced by the fate of Manse’s compatriot Keith Denison in “Brave to Be a King”—namely, what happened to the younger Denison? Perhaps my problem is simply that I don’t grok ℵ-valued logic.

The stories have been collected in various volumes, the most complete of which is the 2006 Time Patrol that contains all but The Shield of Time.

 Time Patrol (May 1955)F&SF 
Delenda Est (Dec 1955)F&SF
Brave to Be a King (Aug 1959)F&SF
The Only Game in Town (Jan 1960)F&SF
Gibraltar Falls (Oct 1975)F&SF
Ivory, and Apes, and Peacocks (Oct 1983)in Time Patrolman
The Sorrow of Din the Goth (Oct 1983)in Time Patrolman
Star of the Sea (Oct 1991)in The Time Patrol
The Year of the Ransom (Apr 1988)about 25,000 words
The Stranger That Is Within Thy Gates (Sep 1990)in The Shield of Time
Women and Horses and Power and War (Sep 1990)in The Shield of Time
Before the Gods That Made the Gods (Sep 1990)in The Shield of Time
Beringia (Sep 1990)in The Shield of Time
Riddle Me This (Sep 1990)in The Shield of Time
Amazement of the World (Sep 1990)in The Shield of Time
Death and the Knight (Jun 1995)in Tales of the Knights Templar

 If you went back to, I would guess, 1946, and worked to prevent your parents’ marriage in 1947, you would still have existed in that year; you would not go out of existence just because you had influenced events. The same would apply even if you had only been in 1946 one microsecond before shooting the man who would otherwise have become your father. 

[Feb 2012]

“Service Call”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: Science Fiction Stories, Jul 1955


It the midst of McCarthyism, Dick wrote this story about an accidental travel through time to the 1950s by a swibble repairman, whereupon Mr. Courtland and his colleagues pry information out of the repairman about exactly what a swibble is and how it has stopped all war.

 —remember the swibble slogan: Why be half loyal? 

[Jan 2012]

“The Discovery of Morniel Mathaway”
by William Tenn
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Oct 1955
An art critic from the 25th century visits struggling poet David Dantziger and his totally unappreciated painter friend Morniel Mathaway.

 So we indulged in the twentieth-century custon of shaking hands with him. First Morniel, then me—and both very gingerly. Mr. Glescu shook hands with a peculiar awkwardness that made me think of the way an Iowan farmer might eat with chopsticks for the first time. 

[Apr 2012]

Casper, the Friendly Ghost
created by Seymour Reit and Joe Oriolo
First time travel: 21 Oct 1955


Every Casper cartoon had the same plot, including at least one (“Red, White and Boo”) from 1955 where Casper wonders whether people in the past will also be scared of him, so he uses a time machine to visit a caveman, Robert Fulton, Paul Revere, General Washington and a Revolutionary War battle.

 Gee, maybe people in the past won’t be scared of me. 

[circa 1960]

X Minus One
by Ernest Kinoy, George Lefferts, et. al.
First time travel: 14 Dec 1955



When Dimension X was canceled in 1951, I wonder whether radio listeners felt like future trekkies. If so, they had to wait less than four years for a revival of sorts with the first 15 episodes of X Minus One being new versions of old DX shows. Those were followed by more than 100 new episodes, many of which were taken from contemporary Galaxy stories and some of which took us through time.

 To the Future (14 Dec 1955)from war in 2155 to peaceful 1950s 
Time and Time Again (11 Jan 1956)dying soldier to his childhood
A Gun for Dinosaur (7 Mar 1956)hunting in the late Mesozoic
Project Mastodon (5 Jun 1956)to the Republic of Mastodonia, 150,000 BC
The Old Die Rich (17 Jul 1956)slueth forced into time machine
Sam, This Is You (31 Oct 1956)phone call from future
Something for Nothing (10 Apr 1957)a wishing machine from future
Morniel Mathaway (17 Apr 1957)art critic from the 25th century
Target One (26 Dec 1956)back to kill Einstein to stop Armageddon

 These are stories of the future, adventures in which you’ll live in a million could-be years on a thousand maybe worlds. The National Broadcasting Company in cooperation with Galaxy Science Fiction magazine presents...X-x-x-x-x...Minus-minus-minus-minus-minus...One-one-one-one-one... 

[Jan 2012]

“Consider Her Ways”
by John Wyndham
First publication: in Sometime, Never, 1956


An amnesiac woman, Jane Waterleigh, awakens in an all-female future world with four castes (mothers, doctors, servants and workers), and she can only assume she’s in a dream or hallucination where she finds herself in an enormous body whom the doctors and servants call “Mother Orchis.”

 Go to the ant, thou sluggard, consider her ways. 

[Jan 2013]

The Winds of Time
by Chad Oliver
First publication: 1956
Here’ another example of what’s not time travel: Aliens crashland on Earth and then sleep 15,000 years in hopes that mankind (in the form of Dr. Wes Chase, for the purposes of this story) will have developed space travel. But I wanted to include the story in my list anyway, because I enjoyed parts of it and because of the quote from Chapter 16, years before a certain other doctor took it to mind that all of Star Fleet should know he was a doctor, not a...

 I’m a doctor, not a space cadet. 

[Apr 2013]

“The Futile Flight of John Arthur Benn”
by Richard Wilson (as by Edward Halibut)
First publication: Infinity Science Fiction, Feb 1956
A man with a death wish wishes himself back in time.

 Now, he thought, what? This was scarcely dinosaur country. 

[Jul 2013]

“The Message”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Feb 1956

Time traveler and historian George tries to travel back to World War II without making any changes to the world.

 George was deliriously happy. Two years of red tape and now he was finally back in the past. Now he could complete his paper on the social life of the foot soldier of World War II with some authentic details. 

[Jul 1976]



The Reggie Rivers Stories
by L. Sprague de Camp
First story: Galaxy Science Fiction, Mar 1956

Dinosaur hunters Reggie Rivers (no relation to the Denver Bronco) and his partner, the Raja, organize time-travel expeditions in a world with a Hawking-style chronological protection principle. The last of these stories is by Chris Bunch:

 A Gun for Dinosaur (Mar 1956)Galaxy 
The Big Splash (Jun 1992)Asimov’s
The Synthetic Barbarian (Sep 1992)Asimov’s
Crocamander Quest (Oct 1992)The Ultimate Dinosaur
The Satanic Illusion (Nov 1992)Asimov’s
The Cayuse (Jan 1993)Expanse
The Mislaid Mastodon (May 1993)Analog
Rivers of Time (Nov 1993)Rivers of Time
Pliocene Romance (Nov 1993)Rivers of Time
The Honeymood Dragon (Nov 1993)   Rivers of Time
Gun, Not for Dinosaur (Nov 1993)Rivers of Time

 Oh, I’m no four-dimensional thinker; but, as I understand it, if people could go back to a more recent time, their actions would affect our own history, which would be a paradox or contradiction of facts. Can’t have that in a well-run universe, you know. 
—from “A Gun for Dinosaur”

[Jul 2011]

“Second Chance”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Good Housekeeping, Apr 1956

A college student lovingly restores a 1923 Jordan Playboy roadster—a restoration that takes him back in time.

 You can’t drive into 1923 in a Jordan Playboy, along a four-lane superhighway; there are no superhighways in 1923. 

[Mar 2005]

“The Failed Men”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Science Fantasy, May 1956

Surry Edmark, a 24th century volunteer on a humanitarian mission to save mankind from extinction some 360,000 centuries in the future, tells his story to a comforting young Chinese woman.

 You are the struback. 

[Apr 2014]

“The Man Who Came Early”
by Poul Anderson
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1956

An explosion throws Sergeant Gerald Robbins from the 1950s to about 990 AD Iceland where, dispite his advanced knowledge, he had trouble fitting in.

 Now, then. There is one point on which I must set you right. The end of the world is not coming in two years. This I know. 

[Jul 2011]

“Absolutely Inflexible”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Fantastic Universe, Jul 1956

Whenever one-way jumpers from the past show up, it’s up to Mahler to shuffle them off to the moon where they won’t present any danger of infection to the rest of humanity, but now Mahler is faced with a two-way jumper.

 Even a cold, a common cold, would wipe out millions now. Resistance to disease has simply vanished over the past two centuries; it isn’t needed, with all diseases conquered. But you time-travelers show up loaded with potentialities for all the diseases the world used to have. And we can’t risk having you stay here with them. 

[Apr 2012]

Classics Illustrated’s The Time Machine
adapted by Lou Cameron
First publication: Classics Illustrated 133, Jul 1956


This first comic book adaptation appeared in the month of my birth. Of course, as a self-respecting child of the ’50s and ’60s, I was never seen reading Classics Illustrated in public. Fortuntately, adults everywhere can now read the classic comic online.

 Then I drew a breath, set my teeth, gripped the starting lever with both hands and went off into time. 


“Compunded Interest”
by Mack Reynolds
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1956

“Mr. Smith” shows up in 1300 A.D. to invest ten gold coins at 10% annual interest with Sior Marin Goldini’s firm, after which he shows up every 100 years to provide guidance.

 In one hundred years, at ten per cent compounded annually, your gold would be worth better than 700,000 zecchini. 

[Dec 2013]

The Door Into Summer
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct—Dec 1956

Inventor Dan Davis falls into bad company and wakes up 30 years later, but he gets an idea of how to put things right even at this late point.

 Denver in 1970 was a very quaint place with a fine old-fashioned flavor; I became very fond of it. It was nothing like the slick New Plan maze it had been (or would be) when I had arrived (or would arrive) there from Yuma; it still had less than two million people, there were still buses and other vehicular traffic in the streets—there were still streets; I had no trouble finding Colfax Avenue. 

[Aug 1968]

“Hopper”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Infinity Science Fiction, Oct 1956
I haven’t yet read this short story that Silverberg expanded to a novel in 1967, though perhaps some day I will spot the Ace Double paperback that packaged it along with four other stories and the short novel, The Seed of Earth.

“Gimmicks Three”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Nov 1956

Isidore Wellby makes a timely pact with the devil’s demon.

 Ten years of anything you want, within reason, and then you’re a demon. You’re one of us, with a new name of demonic potency, and many privileges beside. You’ll hardly know you’re damned. 

[Jul 1976]

“It Ends with a Flicker”
by William Tenn
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Dec 1956
Max AlbenMac Albin is genetically predisposed to survive time travel, so he is the natural choice to go back in time and shift the course of a missle that shifted the course of history.

 Now! Now to make a halfway decent world! Max Alben pulled the little red switch toward him.

flick!

Now! Now to make a halfway interesting world! Mac Albin pulled the little red switch toward him.
flick!
 
[Apr 2012]

Charlton Comics (Anthologies)
First time travel: Strange Suspense Stories #32, May 1957

With the legal demise of Fawcett Comics in the ’50s, Charton Comics took over their non-superhero titles. I’m still tracking down their time-travel stories, but the earliest I’ve found so far is a Steve Ditko tale, “The Last Laugh” in Strange Suspense Stories #32 (May 1957). As I find more, I’ll list them on my time-travel comics page.

 What a book title! Time—The Fourth Dimension! Going time travelling, Lester? 
—from “The Last Laugh”

[circa 1968]

“Blank!”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Infinity Science Fiction, Jun 1957


Dr. Edward Barron has a theory that time is arranged like a series of particles that can be traveled up or down; his colleague and hesitant collaborator August Pointdexter isn’t so sure about the application of the theory to reality.

 An elevator doesn’t involve paradoxes. You can’t move from the fifth floor to the fourth and kill your grandfather as a child. 

[Jul 1976]

“The Assassin”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Imaginative Tales, Jul 1957
Walter Bigelow has spent 20 years of his life building the Time Distorter that will allow him to go back to save Abraham Lincoln.

 The day passed. President Lincoln was to attend the Ford Theatre that night, to see a production of a play called “Our American Cousin.” 

[Apr 2014]

“A Loint of Paw”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1957

Master criminal Montie Stein has found a way around the statute of limitations.

 It introduced law to the fourth dimension. 

[Jul 1976]

CBS Radio Workshop
produced by William N. Robson and William Froug
First time travel: 15 Sep 1957



Perhaps it was Finney’s success in the 50s that encouraged the experimental CBS Radio Workshop to air their only time-travel fantasy in their penultimate episode, “Time Found Again” from a 1935 Mildrem Cram story. Earlier in the series, they did other science fiction including a musical version of Heinlein’s “The Green Hills of Earth,” Pohl and Kornbluth’s The Space Merchants, Huxley’s Brave New World, two Bradbury character sketches, and more.

 Bart: Do you think it’s possible for a person to go back in time?
George: Well, you know there is a theory that nothing is lost, nothing is destroyed.
Bart: Then you do believe it’s possible?
George: Anything is possible, Bart, to a degree. Science has proved that. It’s conceivable, with concentration and imagination, that a person might, for a moment, escape from the present into the past. 
—from “Time Found Again”

[Jan 2012]

“A Gun for Grandfather”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Future Science Fiction, Fall 1957
The para doesn’t quite dox for me, but the story is still enjoyable as Busby’s first publication.

 I’m not kidding you at all,” Barney insisted. “I have produced a workable Time Machine, and I am going to use it to go back and kill my grandfather. 

[Jun 2011]

“Sanctuary”
by William Tenn
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Dec 1957
Henry Hancock Groppus seeks sanctuary from The Ambassador from the Next Century after he is condemned to death for proposing and practicing genetic selective breeding to solve the problems of the Uterine Plague.

 “The point being,” said the Secretary of State, “that most social values are conditioned by the time, place and prevailing political climate. Is that what you mean by perspective? 

[Apr 2012]

The Time Garden
by Edward Eager
First publication: 1958
A garden of thyme and a magic frog (aka the Natterjack) take four children to times past.

 What the Natterjack would have said, no one could tell, for no one had asked him. The Natterjack did not mind. He bided his time. He could wait. 

[Mar 2011]

The Time Traders Series
by Andre Norton
First book: 1958

Young Ross Murdoch, on the streets and getting by with petty crime and quick feet, gets nabbed and sent to a secret project near the north pole.

 The Time Traders (1958)Ross joins the project 
Galactic Derelict (1959)prehistoric alien wreck
The Defiant Agents (Feb 1962)more Russians and aliens
Key Out of Time (Mar 1963)on the planet Hawaika
Firehand, with P.M. Griffin (Jun 1964)vs murderous aliens
Echoes in Time, with Sherwood Smith (Nov 1999)alien Rosetta stone
Atlantis Endgame, with Sherwood Smith (Nov 2002)back to Atlantis

 So they have not briefed you? Well, a run is a little jaunt back into history—not nice comfortable history such as you learned out of a book when you were a little kid. No, you are dropped back into some savage time before history— 

[Mar 2014]

Tom’s Midnight Garden
by Philippa Pearce
First publication: 1958

When young Tom is sent to live in a flat with his aunt and uncle, all he longs for is a garden to play in; when he finds it during midnight wanderings, it takes him a few nights to realize that the garden and his playmate Hattie are from the previous century.

 Town gardens are small, as a rule, and the Longs’ garden was no exception to the rule; there was a vegetable plot and a grass plot and one flower-bed and a rough patch by the back fence. 

[Mar 2011]

Wards Presents Magical Shoes
First publication: circa 1958
Of course, Montgomery Ward wants every kid to want their shoes, so what better way than to have a giveaway comic book advertisement in which young Billy and Milly realize that their Montgomery Ward shoes were special indeed!

 Milly: They’re like seven-league boots!
Billy: Even better! We’re covering a hundred miles at a step and we’re going back through history, too! These Ward shoes must have magical powers! 

[Jul 2012]


Host John W. Campbell, Jr., by Frank Kelly Freas

Exploring Tomorrow
hosted by John W. Campbell, Jr.
First time travel: 29 Jan 1958


From Dec 1957 to Jun 1958, John W. Campbell himself hosted this radio series for the Mutual Broadcasting System. Many episodes were written by John Flemming, and although there was no official connection between the show and Campbell’s Astounding, many other scripts were by Campbell’s stable of writers including Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Philip K. Dick, Gordon R. Dickson, Murry Leinster, Robert Silverberg and George O. Smith (“Time Traveler”). There were at least three time-travel episodes.

 Flashback (1/29/58)new father flashes forward to war 
Time Traveler, aka Meddler’s Moon (5/21/58)   50 years back to grandparents
The Adventure of the Beauty Queen (6/25/58)love from the future

 You’ve got a son to take care of you in your old age, Mr. Thompson. 
—from “Flashback”

[Mar 2012]

“Aristotle and the Gun”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding Science Fiction, Feb 1958


When Sherman Weaver’s time machine project is abruptly canceled, he takes matters into his own hands, visiting Aristotle with the plan to ensure that the philosopher takes the scientific method to heart so strongly that the dark ages will never come and science will progress to a point where it appreciates Sherman’s particular genius.

 Like his colleagues, Aristotle never appreciated the need for constant verification. Thus, though he was married twice, he said that men have more teeth than women. He never thought to ask either of his wives to open her mouth for a count. 

[May 2012]

“Time Travel Inc.”
by Robert F. Young
First publication: Super-Science Fiction, Feb 1958
I found this in one of three old sf magazines that I traded for at Denver’s own West Side Books. (Thank you, Lois.) Both the title and the table-of-contents blurb (They wanted to witness the Cruxifiction) foreshadow Moorcock’s “Behold the Man”, although the story is not as vivid.

 Oh... The Cruxifiction. You want to witness it, of course— 

[Apr 2014]





The Change War Stories
by Fritz Leiber
First story: Astounding Science Fiction, Mar 1958

Two groups, the Snakes and the Spiders, battle each other for the control of all time.

 Try and Change the Past (Mar 1958)Astounding 
The Big Time (Mar and Apr 1958) Galaxy
Damnation Morning (Aug 1959)Fantastic
The Oldest Soldier (May 1960)F&SF
No Great Magic (Dec 1963)Galaxy
Knight’s Move, aka Knight to Move (Dec 1965)Broadside
...
These might be Change War, but with no time travel:
A Deskful of Girls (Apr 1958) F&SF
The Number of the Beast (Dec 1958)Galaxy
The Haunted Future, aka Tranquility, or Else! (Nov 1959)    Fantastic
The Mind Spider (Nov 1959)Fantastic
When the Change-Winds Blow (Aug 1964) F&SF
Black Corridor (Dec 1967)Galaxy

 Change one event in the past and you get a brand new future? Erase the conquests of Alexander by nudging a Neolithic pebble? Extirpate America by pulling up a shoot of Sumerian grain? Brother, that isn’t the way it works at all! The space-time continuum’s built of stubborn stuff and change is anything but a chain-reaction. 
—“Try and Change the Past”

[Apr 2012]

“Poor Little Warrior!”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1958

You are reading an artsy story, told in the second-person, about a time traveler from AD 2181 who hunts a brontosaurus.

 Time for listening to the oracle is past; you’re beyond the stage for omens, you’re now headed in for the kill, yours or his; superstition has had its little day for today; from now on, only this windy nerve of yours, thius shakey conglomeration of muscle entangled untraceably beneath the sweat-shiny carapice of skin, this bloody little urge to slay the dragon, is going to answer all your orisons. 

[Dec 2013]

“Two Dooms”
by C.M. Kornbluth
First publication: Venture Science Fiction, Jul 1958

Young Dr. Edward Royland, a physicist at Los Alamos in 1945, travels via a Hopi God Food to the early 22nd century to see what a world ruled by the Axis powers will be like—and quite possibly setting off a seemingly endless sequence of alternate WWII stories such as The Man in the High Castle, most of which, sadly, do not include time travel.

I liked Kornbluth’s description of the differential analyzer as well as the cadre of office girls solving differential equations by brute force of adding machines.

 Instead of a decent differential analyzer machine they had a human sea of office girls with Burroughs’ desk calculators; the girls screamed “Banzai!” and charged on differential equations and swamped them by sheer volume; they clicked them to death with their little adding machines. Royland thought hungrily of Conant’s huge, beautiful analog differentiator up at M.I.T.; it was probably tied up by whatever the mysterious “Radiation Laboratory” there was doing. Royland suspected that the “Radiation Laboratory” had as much to do with radiation as his own “Manhattan Engineer District” had to do with Manhattan engineering. And the world was supposed to be trembling on the edge these days of a New Dispensation of Computing that would obsolete even the M.I.T. machine—tubes, relays, and binary arithmetic at blinding speed instead of the suavely turning cams and the smoothly extruding rods and the elegant scribed curves of Conant’s masterpiece. He decided that he would like it even less than he liked the little office girls clacking away, pushing lank hair from their dewed brows with undistracted hands. 

[May 2015]

“First Time Machine”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Honeymoon in Hell, Aug 1958
A short-short, 1950s version of the grandfather paradox with a resolution that’s not quite satisfying (branching universes, I think, but it’s unclear). The cover of the 1958 paperback is by Hieronymus Bosch (Grzegorz’s favorite painter) with an owl in the background (Grzegorz’s favorite bird)!

 What would have happened if you’d rushed to the door and kicked yourself in the seat of the pants? 

[Aug 2011]

“The Ugly Little Boy”
aka "Lastborn"
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Galaxy Magazine, Sep 1958

Edith Fellowes is hired to look after young Timmie, a Neanderthal boy brought from the past, but never able to leave the time statis bubble where he lives.

 He was a very ugly little boy and Edith Fellowes loved him dearly. 

[Mar 1976]

“The Men Who Murdered Mohammed”
by Alfred Bester
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct 1958

When Professor Henry Hassel discovers his wife in the arms of another man, he does what any mad scientist would do: build a time machine to go back and kill his wife’s grandfather. He has no trouble changing the past, but any effect on the present seems rather harder to achieve.

 “While I was backing up, I inadvertently trampled and killed a small Pleistocene insect.”
   “Aha!” said Hassel.
   “I was terrified by the indicent. I had visions of returning to my world to find it completely changed as a result of this single death. Imagine my surprise when I returned to my world to find that nothing had changed!”
 

[Apr 2012]

The Time Element
by Rod Serling
First aired: 23 Nov 1958

Serling wrote this one-hour time-travel episode that aired on the Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse; the traveler, Pete Jensen, couldn’t stop the attack on Pearl Harbor, but he could make his mark as the Twilight Zone precursor.

 I have information that the Japanese are gonna bomb Pearl Harbor tomorrow morning at approximately 8am Honolulu time. 

[Dec 2010]

“A Statue for Father”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Satellite Science Fiction, Feb 1959

A wealthy man’s father was a time-travel researcher who died some years ago, but not before leaving a legacy for all mankind.

 They’ve put up statues to him, too. The oldest is on the hillside right here where the discovery was made. You can just see it out the window. Yes. Can you make out the inscription? Well, we’re standing at a bad angle. No matter. 

[Dec 2009]

Hallmark Hall of Fame
First time travel: 5 Feb 1958


Over the years, I’ seen dozens of the Hallmark Hall of Fame specials. More recently, I went through the list of episodes back to 1951 when they started as a weekly anthology show on NBC. I spotted only one episode with time travel, the venerable Berkeley Square, broadcast in color on a special day in 1959, but I haven't yet tracked down a copy to watch.
[Dec 1965]

“—All You Zombies—”
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Mar 1959



A 25-year-old man, originally born as an orphan girl named Jane, tells his story to a 55-year-old bartender who then recruits him for a time-travel adventure.

 When I opened you, I found a mess. I sent for the Chief of Surgery while I got the baby out, then we held a consultation with you on the table—and worked for hours to salvage what we could. You had two full sets of organs, both immature, but with the female set well enough developed for you to have a baby. They could never be any use to you again, so we took them out and rearranged things so that you can develop properly as a man. 

[May 1970]
from the telerecording of Nineteen-Eighty-Four
BBC Sunday-Night Theater
aka BBC Sunday-Night Play (1960-1963)
by
First time travel: 31 May 1959



For nearly all of 14 years, the BBC staged and broadcast weekly live plays, at least one which included time travel: a production of the 1926 play, Berkeley Square. According to lostshows.com, no copy of Berkeley Square survived, but I did enjoy a telerecording of their 1954 staging of Nineteen-Eighty-Four (with no time travel!) that caused a stir in cold-war era Britain.

 Attention, comrades, attention! Here is a complementary production bulletin issued by the Ministry of Plenty giving further glorious news of the success of the seventh three-year plan! In clear demonstration of the rising standards of our new, happy life, the latest calculated increases are as follows... 
Nineteen-Eighty-Four

[Feb 1977]





Hector Heathcote
created by Eli Bauer
First publication: 4 Jul 1959

Hector first appeared in a movie theater short feature (I miss those) called “The Minute and ½ Man” in 1959 where he goes back to the American Revolution and fouls things up until the end when he scares away the Redcoats (remniscent of the 1955 Casper cartoon). I haven’t seen that first cartoon in which Hector travels by time machine, but Hector later had tv escapades (his own show, starting 5 Oct 1963) visiting the likes of Daniel Boone and inventing the telephone in 1876, all without a time machine in the ones I saw. There was also a children’s book, a Dell comic book (Mar 1964) and a Colorforms play set (which provided the image to the top-left). The book had no time machine, but I don’t know about the other items.

 You’re wanted on the telephone—a young lady. 
—Wilbur the dog in “The First Telephone”

[circa 1963]

“Obituary”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1959

The wife of Lancelot Stebbins (not his real name) tells of the difficulties of being married to a man who is obsessively driven to find fame as a physicist, even to the point of worrying about what his obituary will say—but perhaps time travel can put that worry to rest.

 At any rate, he turned full on me. His lean body shook and his dark eyebrows pulled down over his deep-set eyes as he shrieked at me in a falsetto, “But I’ll never read my obituary. I’ll be deprived even of that.” 

[Apr 1979]

“The Love Letter”
by Jack Finney
First publication: The Saturday Evening Post, 1 Aug 1959


A young man looking for love in 1959 Brooklyn finds and answers a letter from a young woman in 1869 Brooklyn.

 The folded paper opened stiffly, the crease permanent with age, and even before I saw the date I knew this letter was old. The handwriting was obviously feminine, and beautifully clear—it’s called Spencerian, isn’t it?—the letters perfectly formed and very ornate, the capitals especially being a whirl of dainty curlicues. The ink was rust-black, the date at the top of the page was May 14, 1882, and reading it, I saw that it was a love letter. 

[Mar 2005]

The Twilight Zone
created by Rod Serling
First time travel: 30 Oct 1959

Five seasons with at least 13 time-travel episodes. Three (marked with ¤) were written by Richard Matheson, one was by E. Jack Neuman (“Templeton”), one by Reginold Rose (“Horace Ford”), and the rest were by Serling (including “What You Need” based on a Lewis Padgett story with prescience only and no real time travel, and “Execution” from a story of George Clayton Johnson).

 Walking Distance (30 Oct 1959)Hero to time of youth 
Judgment Night (4 Dec 1959)Time Loop in World War II
What You Need (25 Dec 1959)Prescience (no time travel)
The Last Flight (5 Feb 1960) ¤42 years beyond WW II
Execution (1 Apr 1960)From 1880 West to 1960 NY
The Trouble with Templeton (9 Dec 1960)To 1927
Back There (13 Jan 1961)Lincoln in 1865
The Odyssey of Flight 33 (24 Feb 1961)To age of dinosaurs and more
A Hundred Yards over the Rim (7 Apr 1961)From 1847 to 1961
Once Upon a Time (15 Dec 1961) ¤From 1890s to present
Death Ship (7 Feb 1963) ¤Time Loop?
No Time Like the Past (7 Mar 1963)To 1881 Indiana
The Incredible World of Horace Ford (18 Apr 1963)   Hero to Time of Youth
The Bard (23 May 1963)Shakespeare to the present

 There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man’s fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the Twilight Zone. 

[Jul 1966]

“Halloween for Mr. Faulkner”
by August Derleth
First publication: Fantastic Universe, Nov 1959
Mr. Guy Faulkner, an American lost in the London fog, finds himself back in the time of the Gunpowder Plot.

 I say, Wright, now Guy’s here, we can get on with it. 

[Jul 2013]

Peabody’s Improbable History
created by Ted Key
First aired: 29 Nov 1959


The genius dog, Mr. Peabody, and his boy Sherman travel back in the Wayback Machine to see what truly happened at key points of history.

 Peabody here. 

[circa 1965]

Dell’s The Time Machine
adapted by Alex Toth
First publication: Mar 1960

The second comic book adaption was drawn by the talented storyteller and artist Alex Toth who closely followed the movie script in Dell’s Four Color #1085. Online sources indicate that this was March of 1960, though that would be several months before the movie.

 The year is 1900. The place is London, England, at an imposing mansion overlooking the river Thames. Impatient dinner guests sit in the library, awaiting an overdue host... 

[Aug 2005]

“I Love Galesburg in the Springtime”
by Jack Finney
First publication: McCall’s, Apr 1960


Reporter Oscar Mannheim has many opportunities in his long life, but never wants to leave the midwest Galesburg that he grew up in—and neither do its many other citizens and artifacts of the past.

 Tomake sure, I walked over to a newsboy and glanced at the stack of papers at his feet. It was The World; and The World had’t been published for years. The lead story said something about President Cleveland. I’ve found that front page since, in the Public Library files, and it was printed June 11, 1894. 

[Mar 2005]

The Boy and the Pirates
by Bert I. Gordon, Lillie Hayward and Jerry Sackham (Gordon, director)
First release: 13 Apr 1960

Young Jimmy Warren asks a genie to send him from present-day Massachusetts to the time of Blackbeard where in order to avoid becoming a genie himself, Jimmy must trick the pirate into returning to Massachusetts.

 This is a funny lookin’ bottle—yeah, neat. But I bet if I took it home, Pop would say, “It’s just another piece of junk.” Nobody let’s me do anything I want to. I wish I was far away from here; I wish I was on a pirate ship. 

[Jan 2015]

“Flirgleflip”
by William Tenn
First publication: Of All Possible Worlds, Jun 1960
It’s difficult living in the intermediate era—the first to have an official Temporal Embassy from the future—because the embassy is always bossing people around and canceling promising research, but Thomas Alva Banderling won’ be stopped from sending his Martian archaeologist flirglefliper friend Terton to the past so that Banderling himself can get credit for inventing the time machine.

 Exactly. The Temporal Embassy. How can science live and breathe with such a modifier? It’s a thousand times worse than any of these ancient repressions like the Inquisition, military control, or university trusteeship. You can’t do this—it will be done first a century later; you can’t do that—the sociological impact of such an invention upon your period will be too great for its present capacity; you should do this—nothing may come of it now, but somebody in an allied field a flock of years from now will be able to integrate your errors into a useful theory. 

[Apr 2012]

Beyond the Time Barrier
by Arthur C. Pierce
First release: July 1960

Major Bill Allison flies the experimental X-80 into the future where a plague has turned most humans into subhuman mutants and the rest (one of whom is a beautiful proto-Betazoid) are mostly mutes who live in an enclave wearing prototype Star Trek uniforms.

 Other nations? Mutants? What kind of talk is this? 

[Nov 2013]

“The Covenant”
by Anderson, Asimov, Sheckley, Leinster, and Bloch
First publication: Fantastic, Jul 1960

Captain Ban, son of the Warden, is told by an oracle that he alone must fly to the island stronghold of those masters of time, the Cloud-People.

 Your world is a slope and you roll down it all the time. Down and down until you wear out and die. 

[Dec 2003]

George Pal’s The Time Machine
adapted by David Duncan (George Pal, director)
First release: 17 Aug 1960


The time traveller now has a name—H. George Wells (played by Rod Taylor)—and Weena has the beautiful face of Yvette Mimieux.

 When I speak of time, I’m speaking of the fourth dimension. 


Archie Superhero Comics
created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby
First time travel: Adventures of the Fly #8, Sep 1960


Simon and Kirby created The Fly as part of Archie Comics attempt to ride the silver age superhero craze. He flew through time at least five times, with the first episode (in issue #8, no longer Simon and Kirby) being a trip to 3rd century Persia. The Jaguar also trekked at least six times starting in Pep #5 (Oct 1961) and continuing in the Man of Feline’s own comic book, Adventures of the Jaguar as well as Laugh Comics. And the Shield had some time-travel adventures, beginning in The Fly #37 (May 1966) where he met a gladiator from the future.

 My colleagues, clever as they are, would never dream of the angle I’ll use to get rid of the Fly! I’ll destroy him with beauty! 
—the evil Dovi in Adventures of the Fly #22 while bringing

[Apr 2012]

Tooter Turtle
First aired: 15 Oct 1960

In each of the 39 short episodes (aired as part of King Leonardo and His Short Subjects), young Tooter would visit Mr. Wizard with the latest passionate idea of what he wanted to be. Mr. Wizard would magically make him into his wish (often back in time), but it would always end up with Tooter learning a lesson.

 Be just vhat you is, not vhat you is not. Folks vhat do zis are ze happiest lot. 

[Dec 2010]

“My Object All Sublime”
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Jun 1961

A man becomes fast friends with a real estate entrepreneur who, one night, tells him a fantastic story of time-travelers in the far future who use the past as a criminal dumping ground.

 The homesickeness, though, that’s what eats you. Little things you never noticed. Some particular food, the way people walk, the games played, the small-talk topics. Even the constellations. They're different in the future. The sun has traveled that far in its galactic orbit. 

[Nov 2013]

Walt Disney’s Donald Duck and the Gang Classical Cartoons
First time travel: 21 Jun 1961

Even before the modern Duck Tales that my kids watched, I’ll bet the animated Disney gang went romping through time numerous times. The only one that I remember seeing as a kid myself was a trek by a singing father and son to see the invention of the wheel by a prehistoric Donald Duck (“Donald and the Wheel”).

 Donald and the Wheel (21 Jun 1961)Donald Duck 
Sir Gyro de Gearloose (6 Oct 1987)Duck Tales
Time Is Money (25 Nov 1988)Duck Tales

 This cat is really nowhere; in some circles, we’d call him square. 

[Jul 2013]

“The End”
aka "Nightmare in Time"
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Nightmares and Geezenstacks, Jul 1961

I like Fredric Brown and his creative mind, but this was just a gimmick short short time-travel story in which the gimmick didn’t gimme anything. Now, if he had used this gimmick and the story had actually parsed, that would have caught my attention.

 ... run backward run... 

[Jul 2013]

“Rainbird”
by R.A. Lafferty
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Dec 1961

At the end of this life, Higgston Rainbird, a prolific inventor of the late 18th century, invents a time machine to go back in time to tell himself how to be even more prolific.

 Yes, I’ve missed so much. I wasted a lot of time. If only I could have avoided the blind alleys, I could have done many times as much. 

[Jul 2011]

A Wrinkle in Time Series
by Madeleine L’Engle
First book: 1962

I’m not sure that I remember a whole lot of time travel happening in the first book of the series, but as my excuse, Janet and I were mostly making eyes at each other as we read the mushy parts aloud in a tent in Scotland when we were young.

 It was a dark and stormy night. 

[Jun’1978]

Clyde Crashcup
created by Ross Bagdasarian
First time travel: 31 Jan 1962

As a separate feature in The Alvin Show, Quirky Clyde Crashcup (with his assistant Leonardo) invented everything from babies to...a time machine that reverses all time.

 I should like to remind you that all of you who witnessed this demonstration are five minutes younger than you were when we started. 

[Sep 2012]

The Three Stooges Meet Hercules
by Norman Maurer and Elwood Ullman
First release: 15 Feb 1962

I’m a disgrace to my gender, as I coitainly never received the Three Stooges gene.

 I’ll smash the first guy who says it’s all Greek to him. 

[Jun 2012]





The Times Without Numbers Stories
by John Brunner
First story: Science Fiction Adventure, #25, Mar 1962

In an alternate Spanish-dominated 20th century, Don Miguel Navarro is a time traveller in the western world’s Society of Time who are locked in a time-travel cold war with the Confederacy of the East, not to mention their task of tracking down various time crimes.

I try to avoid major spoilers (stop reading now, if you wish), but the reason that Don Miguel ends up in a world without time travel is one that I thought of (long after Brunner) based on fixed-points in mathematics. That idea alone gives the story an extra star.

The original three stories appeared in three consecutive issues of Science Fiction Adventure, and they were later fixed up into a short novel that was subsequently expanded. It’s the expanded version that I read from the CU library.

 Spoil of Yesterday (Mar 1962)Science Fiction Adventure 
The Word Not Written (May 1962)Science Fiction Adventure
The Fullness of Time (Jul 1962)Science Fiction Adventure
Times Without Numbers (1962)fix-up novel
Times Without Numbers (1969)expanded

 It wasn’t only the embarrassing experience of being shown off around the hall by her—as it were, a real live time-traveller, exclamation point, in the same tone of voice as one would say, “A real live tiger!” That happened too often for members of the Society of Time not to have grown used to it; there were, after all, fewer than a thousand of them in the whole of the Empire. 

[Apr 2014]









Marvel Superhero Comics
fearlessly led by Stan Lee
First time travel: Fantastic Four 5, Jul 1962

The Marvel Brand began as early as 1939 with the first edition of Marvel Comics. Throughout the ’40s and ’50s, some of the Timely and Atlas comics had the slogan “A Marvel Magazine,” ”Marvel Comic,” or a small “MC” on the cover (such as Tiny Tessie 24, which I found in my dad’s stash).

As for me, I was hooked when Marvel started publishing the Fantastic Four in 1961. During the sixties, I devoured all 830 Marvel superhero comics as they arrived at the local Rexall Drug Store. By my count, 37 of those 830 issues in the ’60s involved superhero time travel, starting with Fantastic Four #5 in July 1962. After 1969, there was no time travel in comic books, not ever (or, if you prefer, you may count everything as time travel, but never mind). Are you suprised that Spider-man never took off in time during the ’60s? He did come close in Avengers #11, but in any case, here are those occurrences:

 Fantastic Four 5 (Jul 1962)FF to time of Blackbeard 
Journey into Mystery 86 (Nov 1962)Thor vs Zarkko, the Tomorrow Man
Journey into Mystery 101 (Feb 1963)Thor travels to future to be Zarkko slave
Journey into Mystery 102 (Feb 1963)   Thor returns to the present, a free god!
Tales of Suspense 44 (Aug 1963)Iron Man to time of Cleopatra
Fantastic Four 19 (Oct 1963)FF to ancient Egypt
Strange Tales 123 (Aug 1963)Doc Strange sends Thor’s hammer back
Fantastic Four 23 (Feb 1964)Dinosaur to Baxter Building
Avengers 8 (Sep 1964)Kang the Conqueror from the future
Fantastic Four Annual 2 (Sep 1964)FF vs Rama-Tut [reprint and new]
Strange Tales 124 (Sep 1964)Doc Strange to time of Cleopatra
Avengers 10 (Nov 1964)Immortus (aka Kang) from the future
Avengers 11 (Dec 1964)Kang (again) and Spider-Man (sort of)
Fantastic Four 34 (Jan 1965)Gideon uses Doom’s machine
Strange Tales 129 (Feb 1965)Doc Strange travels back an hour or so
Strange Tales 134 (Jul 1965)FF vs Kang
Fantastic Four Annual 3 (Sep 1965)Cadre of villains sent to the past
Avengers 23 (Dec 1965)Avengers defeated by Kang in the future
Journey into Mystery 122 (Nov 1965)Thor moves Hobbs through time
Avengers 24 (Jan 1966)Avengers defeat Kang in the future!
Tales to Astonish 75 (Jan 1966)Hulk to post-apocalyptic future
Tales to Astonish 76 (Feb 1966)Hulk vs King Arrkam in the future
Tales to Astonish 77 (Mar 1966)Hulk vs the Executioner in the future
Tales to Astonish 78 (Apr 1966)Hulk returns from post-apocalyptic future
Avengers 28 (May 1966)Collector/Beetle in time machine
Strange Tales 148 (Sep 1966)Book of Vishanti to ancient times
Strange Tales 150 (Nov 1966)Doc Strange to ancient Babylon
Thor 140 (May 1967)Thor vs Growing Man (Kang’s minion)
Avengers 56 (Sep 1968)To World War II
Avengers Annual 2 (Sep 1968)The Scarlett Centurion (aka Kang)
Iron Man 5 (Sep 1968)Warriors from 24th century
Marvel Super-Heroes 18 (Jan 1969)Guardians of the Galaxy from the Future
Marvel Super-Heroes 20 (May 1969)Diablo uses Doom’s time platform
Silver Surfer 6 (Jun 1969)To the future and back by traveling fast
Avengers 69 (Oct 1969)Avengers vs Kang in 41st century
Avengers 70 (Nov 1969)Avengers vs Squadron Sinister
Avengers 71 (Dec 1969)Avengers to 1941 vs Invaders

 And now I shall send you back...hundreds of years into the past! You will have forty-eight hours to bring me Blackbeard’s treasure chest! Do not fail! 
—Dr. Doom in Fantastic Four #5

[Jun 1962]



Dell/Gold Key Spin-Off Comics
First time travel: Dell Movie Classics 208, Aug 1962
In addition to the well-known comic book adaptation of The Time Machine, Dell and Gold Key comics had numerous movie and tv spin-offs in the 60s, some of which had time travel. Some were just one-shots (such as The Three Stooges Meet Hercules in Dell Movie Classics 208; and Hector Heathcote in 1964) while others were series (such as the short-lived two issues of The Time Tunnel in 1967). As I find others, I’ll add them to my time travel comic book page.

 Two scientists are hurled helpless into the lost world of time! 
—from the cover of The Time Tunnel 1.

[Feb 1967]

Harvey Comics
founded by Alfred Harvey
First time travel: Richie Rich 13, Oct 1962
I’m sure I’ll find some earlier time travel in Harvey Comics, but Richie Rich #13 was the first Harvey Comic that I ever bought (the same month as Fantastic Four #7). On the cover, the poor little rich boy was watching his big-screen tv with a master control that also indicated movies, hi-fi, phono-vision, short wave and satellites. And inside he time traveled to visit his ancestor Midas Rich. What more could a six-year-old want?

 Away we go, Mawster Richie! 
—Alas, I no longer have #13, so I don’t know whether Cadbury said this or not, but he should have!

[Sep 1962]

“Time Has No Boundaries”
aka "The Face in the Photo"
by Jack Finney
First publication: The Saturday Evening Post, 13 Oct 1962


Young physics Professor Weygand is questioned by Instructor Martin O. Ihren about the disappearance of several recent criminals who have shown up in very old photos.

 I did, and saw what he meant; a face in the old picture almost identical with the one in the Wanted poster. It had the same astonishing length, the broad chin seeming nearly as wide as the cheekbones, and I looked up at Ihren. “ Who is it? His father? His grandfather?” 

[Mar 2005]

Astro Boy
aka Tetsuwan Atomu
created by Osamu Tezuka
First U.S. syndication: 1963


Astro Boy began as a Japanese comic (manga) in 1952 and then became an anime cartoon before anybody knew what anime was. The cartoons of the 21st century Pinocchioish robot boy were dubbed in English and syndicated in the U.S. starting in 1963. I do remember one time-travel episode in which Astro Boy stopped a time-traveling collector from the future who was after ancient animals and people for his zoo; and I suspect there was more time travel in the manga and later U.S. cartoons.

 Dad’s taking animals and plants and even people back with him to display in the 23rd century. 
—“Time Machine” (1963)

[circa 1963]

Time at the Top Series
by Edward Ormondroyd
First book: 1963

When motherless young Susan Shaw stumbles into a seventh floor porthole to the 19th century where she meets two fatherless children, the story from these two books (Time at the Top and All in Good Time) seems predictable, but Ormondroyd (and I) still had fun with it.

 It had come to her that part of the seventh floor must have been converted in o a very realistic stage set, and that the woman and the girl had been rehearsing their parts in a play. But no, that couldn’t be it. No stage set that she had ever seen was so realistic thatyoucould hear cows and smell flowers and feel the warmth of the sunlight. 

[Dec 2014]

Time Cat
by Lloyd Alexander
First publication: 1963

Jason’s cat, Gareth, calmly reveals that he can take Jason to nine different times, and the history lessons ensue.

 I can visit nine different lives. Anywhere, any time, any country, any century. 

[Aug 2012]

“Who Else Could I Count On?”
by Manly Wade Wellman
First publication: Who Fears the Devil?, 1963

Wellman’s tall-tales character of John the Balladeer has a conversation with an old man who came from forty years in the future to stop a terrible war.

 I’ve come back to this day and time to keep it from starting, if I can. Come with me, John, we’ll go to the rulers of this world. We’ll make them believe, too, make them see that the war mustn’t start. 

[Jul 2013]

Brain Boy
created by Herb Castle and Gil Kane
First time travel: Brain Boy #4, Mar/May 1963


All you really need to be a superhero is to be really smart. That’s Brain Boy, and he battled a time machine in #4 (Mar/May 1963).

 And you haven’t asked what the late Professor Krisher was working on. It was the practical application of a theory of time travel! Going back in time—say to civil war days, or the days of the Roman Empire! 

[Sep 1971]

A Hoax in Time
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Fantastic, Jun-Aug 1963
I haven’t yet read this serialized version that Laumer expanded to the novel The Great Time Machine Hoax in 1964, though I think this shorter version might have been published in the Armchair Fiction Double Novel #31 in 2011).

“Flux”
by Michael Moorcock and Barrington J. Bayley
First publication: New Worlds, Jul 1963
When the government of the European Economic Community has no idea what to do next, they send Marshall-in-Chief Max File ten years into the future to find out the eventual effects of their actions.

Although this story was too abstract for my taste, I did enjoy the early presentation of what today might be called a Boltzmann Brain.

 The world from which he had come, or any other world for that matter, could dissipate into its component elements at any instant, or could have come into being at any previous instant, complete with everybody’s memories! 

[Apr 2012]

The Gasman Cometh
by Michael Flanders and Larry Swann
First publication: in the show At the Drop of Another Hat, 2 Oct 1963

When Janet asked why I was listening to this favorite of hers one Saturday morning, I told her I was adding it to my time travel page. She just rolled her eyes and said, “I never would have guessed.”

 ’Twas on a Monday morning, the gasman came to call... 

[Jun 1980]

Dr. Who
created by Sydney Newman, C.E. Webber, and Donald Wilson
First episode: 23 Nov 1963

Sadly, I’ve never been a vassel of the Time Lord, though I’ve seen his pull on his other subjects such as my student Viktor who gave me a run-down of the tv and movie series and spin-offs. In exchange, I guaranteed him at least a 4-star rating and he promised to never again mention the short story, comic book, audio book, radio, cartoon, novel, t-shirt, stage and coffee mug spin-offs.

 Dr. Who (23 Nov 1963 - 6 Dec 1989)original series 
Dr. Who and the Daleks (23 Aug 1965)theatrical movie
Daleks’s Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D. (5 Aug 1966)theatrical movie
K-9 and Company (28 Dec 1981)spin-off series
P.R.O.B.E. The Zero Imperative (1994)direct-to-video
P.R.O.B.E. The Devil of Winterborne (1995)direct-to-video
P.R.O.B.E. Unnatural Selection (1996)direct-to-video
P.R.O.B.E. Ghosts of Winterborne (1996)direct-to-video
Dr. Who (12 May 1996)tv movie
Dr. Who (26 Mar 2005 - present)series revival
Torchwood (22 Oct 2006 - 15 Sep 2011)spin-off series
The Sarah Jane Adventures (1 Jan 2007 - 18 Oct 2011)spin-off series
K-9 and Company (31 Oct 2009 - 3 Apr 2010)spin-off series
Counter-Measures (Jul 2012 - Jan 2014)audio spin-off

 Hard to remember. Some time soon now, I think. 
—The Doctor answering a police officer’s query as to his date of birth


“Waterspider”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: If, Jan 1964

Aaron Tozzo and his colleague Gilly travel back to a 1950s science fiction convention (to them, a Pre-Cog Gathering) to ’nap Poul Anderson because they believe that sf writers have pre-cognition of their own time that can solve their current space travel problem. A cute story with descriptions of many writers of the time, but the ending takes that turn that I never like of Tozzo slowly losing his memory of the original world after they inadvertantly change something.

 “Yes,” he said to Poul, “you do strike me as very, very faintly introve—no offense meant, sir, I mean, it’s legal to be introved.” 

[Dec 2011]

Herbie, the Fat Fury
created by Richard E. Hughes (as by Shane O’Shea) and Ogden Whitney
First time travel: Herbie #1, Apr/May 1964

Herbie Popnecker was the prototypical cool nerd before there were cool nerds, and his lollipops and grandfather clock took him to different eras 13 times, the first episode being in #1 of his own comic (after five monotime appearances in ACG’s Forbidden Worlds). He also had an early cameo in a time-travel story in Unknown Worlds #20 (Jan 1963). All in all, the fat fury time traveled in Herbie #1, #2, #4, #6, #8, and the odd issues in #9 through #23 (not to mention a 1994 cameo in Flaming Carrot #31).

 Civil War...wonder how it’s going to turn out? 

[Apr 1964]

Farnham’s Freehold
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: If, Jul to Oct 1964

Hugh Farnam makes good preparations for his family to survive a nuclear holocast, but are the preparations enough to survive a trip to the future?

 Because the communists are realists. They never risk a war that would hurt them, even if they could win. So they won’t risk one they can’t win. 

[Aug 1969]

“A Bulletin from the Trustees of the Institute for Advanced Research at Marmouth, Massachusetts”
by Wilma Shore
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1964
After Dr. Edwin Gerber’s death, a tape recording surfaces that purportedly has him interviewing a man from the year 2061.

 Q. How does it feel to go back a hundred— 

[Apr 2012]

Charlton Superhero Comics
First time travel: Blue Beetle 2, Sep 1964
When I turned 10, Steve Ditko broke my heart by leaving Spider-Man to rejoin Charlton Comics, which published only two superheroes at that time. I loyally bought the new Blue Beetle (aquired from Fox Comics in the ’50s) and Captain Atom (whom Ditko had first drawn in 1960’s Space Adventures), but I no longer have them and I can’t remember whether they had any time travel in the ’60s. Nevertheless I know of a few possible time-travel moment in the ’60s Charlton superhero comics: the pre-Ditko Blue Beetle #2 (Sep 1964) features on its cover the Man of Dung vs. a mammoth and a saber-tooth tiger; Charton Premiere #1 (Sep 1967), which (among other items) has Pat Boyette’s time traveling Spookman; and Hercules #9 (Feb 1969) with Thane of Bagarth vs a 21st century time traveler.

 The mightiest man battles reds from today, and monsters from yesterday! 
—from Blue Beetle #2, Sep 1964

[Jul 1966]

The Great Time Machine Hoax
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Sep 1964


When Chester W. Chester inherits an omniscient computer, he and his business partner Case Mulvihill arrange to promote the machine as if it were a time machine.

 Now, this computer seems to be able to fake up just about any scene you want to take a look at. You name it, it sets it up. Chester, we’ve got the greatest side-show attraction in circus history! We book the public in at so much a head, and show ’em Daily Life in Ancient Rome, or Michelangelo sculpting the Pietà, or Napoleon leading the charge at Marengo. 

[Jan 2014]



The Alfred Hitchcock Hour
aka Alfred Hitchcock Presents
created by Alfred Hitchcock
First (and only?) time travel: 28 Sep 1964


As a kid, I knew of the iconic theme song and profile of Alfred Hitchcock, but it wasn’t until 2013 that I spotted an episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour with time travel—namely, their adaptation of John Wyndham’s “Consider Her Ways.”

 This evening’s tale begins with a nightmare-like experience, but that is only a prelude to the terrifying events which follow. And now, speaking of terrifying events... 

[Jan 2013]

The Time Travelers
by Ib Melchor and David L. Hewitt (Melchor, director)
First release: 29 Oct 1964


When group of time travelers accidentally see that the world will be desolate 107 years in the future, an electrician, two scientists and finally the curvaceous blonde technician all jump through the portal, only to have the portal collapse behind them, whereupon they are chased on the surface by Morlockish creatures who are afraid of thrown rocks and they meet an advanced, post-apocalyptic, underground society that employs androids and is planning a generation-long trip to Alpha Centauri.

 Keep an eye out for them. Get as many rocks as you can. 

[May 2012]

“Famous First Words”
by Harry Harrison
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 1965
For the most part, this story is about a cantankerous inventor who merely listens in on past historical events—which, of course does not qualify as time travel. But there’s that “for the most part...”

 Thor, will you please take care of... 

[Feb 2010]

“The Kilimanjaro Machine”
aka “The Kilimanjaro Device”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Life, 22 Jan 1965

This story is Bradbury’s tribute to Hemingway, a time-traveling tribute told from the point of view of a reader who admired him and felt that his Idaho grave was wrong.

 On the way there, with not one sound, the dog passed away. Died on the front seat—as if he knew. . .and knowing, picked the better way. 

[Apr 2014]



Campfire Tales from Philmont Scout Ranch
by Al Stenzel
First publication: Boys’ Life, Mar 1965

A Navaho who steps through the cave finds himself at a vast inland sea; at first it is populated by dinosaurs, but each subsequent strip takes him to a later time.

Jon Shultis told me of this comic strip that told the tale of the Cave of Time in many of the Boys’ Life issues from March 1965 through March 1967.

 This is all wrong! If I dare change their stone age way of life, it may affect the whole future of their race. 

[Jun 2012]

“Double Take”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Playboy, Apr 1965

Jake Pelman is hopelessly in love with Jessica, the breathtaking star in a movie that he works on, but it takes a breathless trip to the 1920s for Jess to realize what her feelings for Jake might be.

 Out of the world’s three billion people there can’t be more than, say, a hundred women like Jessica Maxwell. 

[May 2011]

“Man in His Time”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Science Fantasy, Apr 1965
Janet Westerman is trying to cope with the return of her husband Jack from a mission to Mars in which some aspect of the planet made it so that his sensory input now comes from 3.3077 minutes in the future.

 Dropping the letter, she held her head in her hands, closing her eyes as in the curved bone of her skull she heard all her possible courses of action jar together, future lifelines that annihilated each other. 

[Aug 2012]

“Wrong-Way Street”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Apr 1965

Ever since an accident that killed his eight-year-old brother, Mike Capoferri has been interested in time travel, and now he thinks one of the alien artifacts found on the moon is a time machine.

 Mike was a recent but ardent science-fiction fan. “I want to change it, Dr. Stuart,” he said earnestly. “I want to go back to four weeks ago and take away Tony’s Flexy.” He meant it, of course. 

[Apr 2012]



The Corridors of Time
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Amazing Stories, May-Jun 1965

While awaiting trial for a self-defense killing, young Malcolm Lockridge is approached by a wealthy beauty, Storm Darroway, who offers to defend him in return for him joining her in what he eventually finds out are Wars in Time between the naturalist Wardens and the technocrat Rangers.

For many years, I thought this novel was part of Poul’s Time Patrol series, until Bob Hasse mentioned this as one of his favorites that is not in the series. The beginning reminded me of Heinlein’s Glory Road, and the rest is remniscent of Asimov’s The End of Eternity, both of which captivated me in the summer of 1968. Poul’s book holds up well in that company.

 A series of parallel black lines, several inches apart, extended from it, some distance across the corridor floor. At the head of each was a brief inscription, in no alphabet he could recognize. But every ten feet or so a number was added. He saw 4950, 4951, 4952... 

[Apr 2014]

My Favorite Martian
created by John L. Greene
First time travel: 20 Jun 1965

Three seasons with at least 8 time-travel episodes All time travel occurs with Martin’s CCTBS, a cathode-ray, centrifugal, time breakascope.

 Time Out for Martin (20 Jun 1965)to 1215 England 
Go West, Young Martian (12 Sep 1965)to 1849 St. Louis
The Time Machine Is Waking Up... (21 Nov 1965)   Jesse James from 1870
The O’Hara Caper (19 Dec 1965)back to lunchtime
Heir Today, Gone Tomorrow (2 Jan 1966)to 1920/45 Cleveland
When You Get Back Home... (27 Feb 1966)back to the morning
Martin Meets His Match (27 Mar 1966)Da Vinci from 1400s
Pay the Man the $24 (1 May 1966)to 1626 Manhattan

 What a planet for me to get marooned on. 

[Jun 1965]

I Dream of Jeannie
created by Sidney Sheldon
First time travel: 25 Sep 1965


Five seasons with 3 time-travel episodes, all with Jeannie (who was the primary reason I wanted to be an astronaut).

Naturally, I never had any refined taste (as indicated by the four stars), but I was a product of my 60s childhood, and, besides, Jeannie (occassionly and briefly) had a belly button (including Season 5’s “Mrs. Djinn-Djinn”).

 My Hero? (25 Sep 1965)to ancient Babylon 
My Master, the Pirate (13 Mar 1967)to Captain Kidd’s time
My Master, Napoleon’s Buddy (3 Apr 1967)   to Napoleaon's time

 We’re at the marketplace, master. Oh, and there is Ali, the man who hit me. 
—from “My Hero?”

[Sep 1965]

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time
by Yasutaka Tsutsui (David Karashima, translator)
First publication: Chu̅aku Sannen, Nov 1965—Taka IchiMay 1966
After an earthquake and a fire keep her up late, junior high school girl Kazuko Yoshiyama rushes late to school with her friend Goro, and they both are run down by a speeding truck, but then she finds herself waking up again in a seemingly ordinary morning with no last-night earthquake, no last-night fire, and no runaway truck—at least not at this moment.

 As the first period of math class began, Mr. Komatsu—the fat math teacher—wrote down an equation on the board, and Kazuko began to frown. It was the very same problem they’d solved just the day before. But more than that, Mr. Komatsu had written the problem on the board at exactly the same time before, and Kazuko had been called to the front of the class, where she’d struggled for some time over the solution. 

[Feb 2013]

Tunnel Through Time
by Lester Del Rey
First publication: May 1966

When Bob Miller’s dad invents a time machine and sends Doc Tom gets trapped in the time of the dinosaurs, there’s only one possible solution: send a pair of 17-year-olds (including Bob) back on a rescue mission!

This was the first book that I got through the Scholastic Book Club when we moved to Bellevue in 1968. Each month, the club would give you a flier where you ticked off the books that you wanted, and the next month the books would magically show up at school!

 But they’d overlooked someone. Me. Somehow, by hook or crook, I was going to make that trip, too. Doc Tom wasn’t the only one who liked dinos! 

[Apr 1968]





Bewitched
created by Sidney Sheldon
First time travel: 26 May 1966


Eight seasons with at least 19 time-travel episodes, all with the enchanting Samantha. (I had a scheme to become the third Darrin.)

 What Every Young Man Should Know (26 May 1966)courtship days 
A Most Unusual Wood Nymph (13 Oct 1966)to 1300s
My Friend Ben (8 Dec 1966)Ben Franklin
Samantha for the Defense (15 Dec 1966)more Ben
Aunt Clara’s Victoria Victory (9 Mar 1967)Queen Victoria
Bewitched, Bothered, and Infuriated (13 Apr 1967)back a few minutes
Samantha’s Thanksgiving to Remember (23 Nov 1967)to 1620
Samantha’s Da Vinci Dilemma (28 Dec 1967)Da Vinci
Samantha Goes South for a Spell (3 Oct 1968)to 1868
Samantha’s French Pastry (14 Nov 1968)Napoleon
The Battle of Burning Oak (13 Mar 1969)back a few minutes
Samantha’s Caesar Salad (2 Oct 1969)Julius Ceasar
Samantha’s Hot Bedwarmer (8 Oct 1970)1600 Salem
Paul Revere Rides Again (29 Oct 1970)Paul Revere
Samantha’s Old Salem Trip (12 Nov 1970)1600 Salem
The Return of Darrin the Bold (4 Feb 1971)to 1300s
How to Not Lose Your Head I/II (15/22 Sep 1971)Henry VIII
George Washington Zapped Here I/II (19/26 Feb 1972)   George Washington

 Oh, my stars! 

[May 1966]

Warren Comics (Anthologies)
founded by James Warren
First time travel: Creepy 9, Jun 1966


In the late 1960s, these horror comics were a little risqué for a young teen. Afterall, they were the size of a magazine, printed in black-and-white, were sold next to Playboy in the 7-11, and just for your teenaged-boy mind, they featured scantily clad, buxom women. I have only one issue that I actually managed to hang on to (Vampirella #13 from 1970), but I surreptitiously soaked up many other issues of Creepy and Eerie with fabulous covers by Frazetta and Krenkel. The earliest Eerie time travel that I’ve found so far was an adaptation of Robert Bloch’s story “The Past Master” in Eerie #12; and Creepy 9 had an (original?) Alex Toth (who adapted The Time Machine for George Pal) story called “Out of Time” in June 1966.

 Be silent...there is little time! From the pages of the great black book came the incantation that has drawn you from the future... 
—from “Out of Time”, Creepy 9

[Nov 1968]

“Divine Madness”
by Roger Zelazny
First publication: Magazine of Horror, Summer 1966

A man has seizures that reverse small portions of his life that he must then relive.

 The door slammed open. 

[Apr 1974]

“The Man from When”
by Dannie Plachta
First publication: If, Jul 1966

A man goes to investigate an explosion and finds a time traveler.

 A calculated risk, but I proved my point. In spite of everything, I still think it was worth it. 

[Jan 2014]

“Behold the Man”
by Michael Moorcock
First publication: New Worlds, Sep 1966
The first version of this story that I read was the 24-page graphic adaptation scripted by Doug Moench and illustrated by Alex Nino in final issue of my favorite comic magazine of 1975, the short-lived Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction. In the complex story, Karl Glogauer travels back to 28 A.D. hoping to meet Jesus, but none of the historical figures he meets are whom he expected.

 The Time Machine is a sphere full of milky fluid in which the traveler floats enclosed in a rubber suit, breathing through a hose leading into the wall of the machine. 
—from the graphic adaptation

[Oct 1975]

The Time Tunnel
created by Irwin Allen
First aired: 9 Sep 1966


When the senate threatens to cut off funding for Project Tic-Toc, Tony Newman and Doug Phillips set out to prove that the project is viable, but instead they are trapped moving from one past time (perhaps the Titanic!) to another (could be the first manned mission to Mars) each week.

 He could be living in yesterday or next week or a million years from now. 

[Sep 1966]

It’s about Time
created by Sherwood Schwartz
First aired: 11 Sep 1966


Astronauts Gilligan and the Skipper Mac and Hector get thrown from the space age to the stone age, complete with Tyrannosaurus Rex, English-speaking cavemen, a beautiful cavewoman (Imogene Coca) and the requisite hyjinx. Partway through the first season, the cavepeople came to modern-day New York.

During my 2012 visit to Bellevue, my college roommate Paul Eisenbrey reminded me of this show from our childhood.

 It’s about time, it’s about space, about two men in the strangest place. 

[Sep 1966]

Star Trek
created by Gene Roddenberry
First time travel: 29 Sep 1966

There once was a Captain named Kirk
Who was known near and far as a flirt
Into hearts his show grew to
Undoubtedly due to
McCoy and that pointy-eared jerk
Gene Roddenberry is the most famous person that I’ve ever met. In 1975 he came to Pullman and I wangled the job of interviewing him for The Daily Evergreen. I didn’t know what to expect from a famous person, and was thrilled to find him friendly and interested in what I was studying at WSU (journalism at that time). Is this a good place to post my Star Trek limerick (from the fanzine, Free Fall, that Paul Chadwick, Dan Dorman and I published in high school)?

 The Naked Time (29 Sep 1966)back 71 hours 
Tomorrow Is Yesterday (26 Jan 1967)to 1969
The City on the Edge of Forever (6 Apr 1967)   to the 1930s (by Harlan Ellison)
Assignment: Earth (29 Mar 1968)to 1968
All Our Yesterdays (14 Mar 1969)5000 years ago

 Peace and long life. 

[Sep 1966]

NoMan
created by Wally Wood, Len Brown and Larry Ivie
First time travel: NoMan #1, Nov 1966
NoMan, a cloaked hero with the power of invisibility, was a memeber of T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents, a team of superheroes first published in 1965 by Tower Comics. I didn’t read them until 1976, when I bought a black and white reprint comic, Uncanny Tales, when I was in Stirling. I don’t know whether any of the other agents time traveled, but NoMan did in both of the issues of his own comic (#1 in Nov 1966 and #2 in Mar 1967).

 Trapped in the Past! 
—from the cover of NoMan #1

[Jun 2012]

Marvel Superhero Cartoons
First time travel: 10 Nov 1966

Admittedly, I watched Marvel cartoons on ABC Saturday morning as early as 1966, but I was never enamoured by them as I was with the comic books. I can list the first time travel in many series—including what I think is the first actual time travel of Spider-Man in any medium—but I have watched only a few.

 The Tomorrow Man (10 Nov 1966)Marvel Super Heroes 
Rama Tut (9 Dec 1967)Fantastic Four (original)
Vine (16 Nov 1968)Spider-Man
The FF Meet Dr. Doom (21 Oct 1978)Fantastic Four (revival)
The Ghost Vikings (12 Oct 1979)Spider-Woman
The Creature and the Cavegirl (30 Oct 1982)The Hulk
Meets the Girl from Tomorrow (22 Oct 1983)SM and His Amazing Friends
Days of Future Past (13 Mar 1993)X-Men
Hulk Buster (10 Feb 1996)Iron Man
The End of Eternity (16 May 1998)Silver Surfer
Kang (13 Nov 1999)Avengers: United They Stand
Ascension, Part 2 (25 Oct 2003)X-Men: Evolution
Out of Time (15 Sep 2007)FF: World’s Greatest Heroes
Future X (8 Nov 2008) [or earlier?]Wolverine and the X-Men
World War Witch (30 Oct 2010)The Super Hero Squad
Iron Man 2099 (6 Jun 2012)Iron Man: Armored Adventures
New Avengers (25 Jun 2012)Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes  
Planet Doom (8 Dec 2013)Avengers Assemble!

 Hey, listen to this! ‘This is my last entry. I have set the machine to three million B.C. The door will remain open for any who wish to follow.’ 
—“Vine”, Episode 30 of the original Spider-Man cartoon

[Aug 2013]

Space Ghost
by Lewis Marshall, et. al.
First time travel: 26 Nov 1966

Back in 1966, there was a certain excitement about the each fall’s new lineup of cartoons. Maybe it was because the networks (CBS in the case of Space Ghost) made a big deal about it, even advertising in Marvel Comics; or maybe it was because kids had relatively few choices compared with today’s cable extravaganza. Whatever the reason, I do remember anxiously anticipating the new cartoons in 1966, including Space Ghost and Dino Boy. Space Ghost traveled through time at least once, back to the time of the Vikings in “The Time Machine.”

 Spaaaaaaaaaace Ghoooooooooost! 

[Nov 1966]

The Monkees
created by Bob Rafelson and Burt Schneider
First time travel: 12 Dec 1966

I knew that if I rewatched these reruns long enough, the space-time continuum would bend. In the episode “Dance, Monkee, Dance” (12 Dec 1966), Martin Van Buren himself comes for a free dance lesson.

 ♫ I’m in love, I’m a believer, I couldn’t leave her if I tried. ♫ 

[Aug 2011]

One Million Years B.C.
by Brian Clemens (Don Chaffey, director)
First release: 30 Dec 1966

There’s no time travel in One Million Years B.C....or is there? How else do you explain modern humans and dinosaurs coexisting at a time when neither one was running around? (And how else am I gonna get Rachel Welch onto my web page? Remember, I was an impressionable young boy when this was released.)

 Loana: [pointing to self] Loana 

[Dec 2012]

The Wild Wild West
created by Michael Garrison
First time travel: 30 Dec 1966

Agents James T. West and Artemus Gordon (in hindsight, quite likely agents of Warehouse 12) traveled in time at least one time when they met none other than Ricardo Montalbán (aka Kahn) who plays Colonel Noel Barley Vautrain with a scheme to travel back to kill Ulysses S. Grant in “The Night of the Lord of Limbo”.

 The concept of a warp in the fabric of space, a break that could permit an object—or a group of Marco Polos if you please—to enter and go voyaging through space’s unlimited fourth dimension: time. 

[circa 1966]

Journey to the Center of Time
by David L. Hewitt (Hewitt, director)
First release: a forgetable day in 1967

Hewitt was able to take the same plot from his 1964 The Time Travelers, change the blonde to a brunette, and make an even worst movie, which Tim and I really did try to watch on dvd.

 Dr. Gordon: And since space-time is a continuum, the present is only a point moving along that continuum.
Mr. Stanton: When you put it like that, doctor, even I can understand it. 

[Mar 2013]

The Time Hoppers
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: 1967
The High Government of the 25th century has directed Joe Quellen (a Level Seven) to find out who’s behind the escapes in time by lowly unemployed Level Fourteens, Fifteens,...—and put a stop to it.

 Suppose, he thought fretfully, some bureaucrat in Class Seven or Nine or thereabouts had gone ahead on his own authority, trying to win a quick uptwitch by dynamic action, and had rounded up a few known hoppers in advance of their departure. Thereby completely snarling the fabric of the time-line and irrevocably altering the past. 

[Jun 2012]

“Thus We Frustrate Charlemagne”
by R.A. Lafferty
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Feb 1967
The Ktistec machine Epiktistes and wise men of the world decide to change one moment in the dark ages while they carefully watch for changes in their own time.

 We set out basic texts, and we take careful note of the world as it is. If the world changes, then the texts should change here before our eyes. 

[Jul 2011]

“The Doctor”
by Theodore L. Thomas (as by Ted Thomas)
First publication: Orbit 2, Jun 1967
A doctor named Gant volunteers to be the first time traveler and ends up stranded in a time of cave people.

 There had been a time long ago when he had thought that these people would be grateful to him for his work, that he would become known by some such name as The Healer. 

[Jan 2014]

“Hawksbill Station”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Aug 1967
Jim Barrett was one of the first political prisoners sent on a one-way journey to a world of rock and ocean in 2,000,000,000 BC; now a secretive new arrival threatens to upset the harsh world that he looks after.

 One of his biggest problems here was keeping people from cracking up because there was too little privacy. Propinquity could be intolerable in a place like this. 

[Nov 2010]

Lost in Space
created by Irwin Allen
First time travel: 13 Sep 1967


Three seasons with 2 time-travel episodes.

 Visit to a Hostile Planet (13 Sep 1967)  to 1947 
Time Merchant (17 Jan 1968)back to the launch

 Danger Will Robinson, danger! 

[Sep 1967]

An Age
aka Cryptozoic!
by Brian Aldiss
First serialized in: New Worlds, Oct-Dec 1967


Once again, here’s an example that’s not time travel—instead, an artist name Edward Bush (and others) “mind travel” to the Jurassic (and other ages) without physically traveling, although the authoritarian government can’t seem to get their hands on the travels while they’re traveling.

 On his last mind into the Devonian, when this tragic illness was brewing, he had intercourse with a young woman called Ann. 

[May 2015]







Dragonriders of Pern
by Anne McCaffrey (some with Joan Lynn Nye or Tod McCaffrey)
First story: Analog Science Fiction, Oct 1967

By the time that Lessa of Ruatha Hold becomes Weyrwoman of the only remaining dragon weyr, the end of all Pern seems a possibility since a single weyr is not enough to fight off the falling threads from the Red Star.

I first read this when I returned to Pullman in 1978, but it was Allison Thompson-Brown who reminded me of that the dragons can go when as well as where.

 -A. Weyr Search (Oct 1967)Analog 
-B: Dragonrider (Dec 1967-Jan 1968)Analog
1. Dragonflight (1968)includes A and B
2. Dragonquest (1970)first completely new novel
-C: The Smallest Dragonboy (1973)in Science Fiction Tales
-D. A Time When (1975)limited edition
3. The White Dragon (1978)includes D
4. Dragonsong (1976)1st Harper Hall book
5. Dragonsinger (1977)2nd Harper Hall book
6. Dragondrums (1979)3rd Harper Hall book
7. Moreta: Dragonlady of Pern (1983)set 1000 years earlier
-E: The Girl Who Heard Dragons (1986)in collection of same name
8. Nerilka’s Story (1986)sequel to Moreta
9. Dragonsdawn (1988)the first dragonriders
-F: The Impression (1989)in The Dragonlover’s Guide
10. Regegades of Pern (1989)retelling of 1 through 3
-G: Rescue Run (Aug 1991)Analog
11. All the Weyrs of Pern (1991)sequel to Renegades
-H: The P.E.R.N. Survey (Sep 1993)Amazing
-I: The Dolphins’ Bell (1993)Wildside Press
-J: The Ford of Red Hanrahan (1993)in 12
-K: The Second Weyr (1993)in 12
12. The Chronicles of Pern: First Fall (1993)collects G, H, I, J, K
13. The Dolphins of Pern (1994)colonists bring dolphins
14. Dragonseye (Oct 1998)aka Red Star Rising
-L: Runner of Pern (1998)in: Legends
15. The Masterharper of Pern (1998)Harper Robinton’s life
16. The Skies of Pern (2001)a comet hits!
-M: Ever the Twain (2002)in 17
17. A Gift of Dragons (2002)collects C, E, L. M
18. Dragon’s Kin (2003)1st Kindan book
19. Dragonsblood (2005)1st solo by Todd McCaffrey
20. Dragon’s Fire (2006)2nd Kindan book
21. Dragon Harper (2007)3rd Kindan book
22. Dragonheart (2008)by Todd McCaffrey
23. Dragongirl (2010)by Todd McCaffrey
24. Dragon’s Time (2011)sequel to Dragongirl
25. Sky Dragons (2012)sequel to Dragon’s Time

 Dragons can go between times as well as places. They go as easily to a when as to a where. 

[Oct 1978]

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea
created by Irwin Allen
First time travel: 3 Dec 1967


In the fourth season, the futuristic submarine Seaview and its crew had four time-traveling escapades, including the finale.

 Time Lock (12 Nov 1967)to the far future 
A Time to Die (3 Dec 1967)to 1,000,000 B.C.
The Death Clock (24 Mar 1968)  Captain Crane is a time-machine guinea pig
No Way Back (31 Mar 1968)to the time of Benedict Arnold

 Suppose we had a working time device. Would we be able to get back aboard Seaview before the explosion, find out what caused it, and prevent it from happening? 
—Admiral Nelson to Mr. Pem in “No Way Back”

[Nov 1967]

Dark Shadows
created by Dan Curtis
First time travel: 20 Nov 1967

If you were a cool kid in the 60s, you ran home from school to watch Dark Shadows, a vampiresque soap opera that presaged Twilight by about four decades. I wasn’t that cool myself, but my sister Lynda was, and from time to time I overheard her and the cool kids talking about the inhabitants of Collinwood trekking to the late 1700s (in episodes from late 1967 through early 1969) and the late 1800s (in the March 1969 episodes). There may well be other time-travel escapades that have escaped me.

 I’m afraid you must forgive me, miss. If we have met before, I’m sorry to say that I don’t remember it. 
—Barnibus to Victoria Winters when she unexpectedly travels to 1795 for the first time

[Nov 1967]

Hawksbill Station
aka The Anvil of Time
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: 1968
The novelization pads out the original nine chapters of the novella and adds five new chapters with Barrett’s backstory as a revolutionary, right to the point where he’s sent back to the station.

I didn’t get much from the new chapters, and between the novel and the original story, I would recommend reading the 5-star original only.

 So Hawksbill’s machine did work, and the rumors were true, and this was where they sent the troublesome ones. Was Janet here too? He asked. No, Pleyel said. There were only men here. Twenty or thirty prisoners, managing somehow to survive. 

[Aug 2013]

Sam, of de Pluterdag
aka Where Were You Last Pluterday?
by Paul Van Herck
First publication: 1968 (Nederlands), 1973 (English translation)

I’m often confused as to whether an author is being humorous or being artsy, but if I’m not laughing a lot and it sounds a little like Kurt Vonnegut, then I assume it’ art. That’s the case here when science fiction writer Sam is put out of a job because science fiction has been banned, all of which happens just as he falls in love with the beautiful and carefree heiress Julie Vandermasten, who asks him to meet her next Pluterday—and yes, there’s a time machine involved, too, because he needs to go back after missing the Pluterday rendezvous.

 Sam got out of his bed. “Pluterday!” he rejoiced. And today he had an appointment with Julie. He did some push-ups, meditated a short while on the word om, which he didn’t find fulfilling today, washed himself abundantly, and cursed the normal being that called Sunday a beautiful day. 

[Sep 2013]

Star Trek, the Blish Adaptations
adapted by James Blish
First time travel: Feb 1968

I bought the first four of these collections in July of 1971 in Huntsville, and the rest I snapped up as they were issued in the ’70s (plus Blish’s original novel Spock Must Die!). At that point in my life, I could recite them by heart. Here’s the list of time-travel adaptations, which does not include “The Naked Time” (in Star Trek 1) since the 71 hours of time travel was omitted in the Blish version:

 Tomorrow Is Yesterday (Feb 1968)in Star Trek 2 
The City on the Edge of Forever    (Feb 1968)in Star Trek 2
Assignment: Earth (Apr 1969)in Star Trek 3
All Our Yesterdays (Jul 1971)in Star Trek 4

 “Jim,” McCoy said raggedly. “You deliberately stopped me ... Did you hear me? Do you know what you just did?”
   Kirk could not reply. Spock took his arm gently. “He knows,” he said. “Soon you will know, too. And what was ... now is again.”
 
—The City on the Edge of Forever

[Jul 1971]

The Goblin Reservation
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Apr-Jun 1968

Professor Peter Maxwell sets out for one of the Coonskin planets, but his beam is intercepted and later returned to Earth only to find that his beam was actually duplicated, his duplicate has been killed, and his friends (some goblins, a ghost, and a time-traveling neanderthal among others) have already buried him.

I wonder whether this was the first transporter accident story (which, as we all know, eventually leads to two Will Rikers).

 You mean there were two Pete Maxwells? 

[May 2012]

The Masks of Time
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: May 1968
To me, this seemed like Robert Silverberg’s answer to Stranger in a Strange Land, although this time the stranger is Vornan-19, who claims to be from the future.

 There’s no economic need for us to cluster together, you know. 

[May 2014]

“Backtracked”
by Burt K. Filer
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1968
At forty-something, Fletcher sends his current well-honed body back ten years where his out-of-shape thirty-something mind and his thirty-something wife must now accept it without really knowing why the transfer was done.

 Maybe he should call Time Central? No, they were duty bound to give him no help at all. They’d just say that at some point ten years in the future he had gone to them with a request to be backtracked to the present—and that before making the hop his mind had been run through that clear/reset wringer of theirs. 

[Apr 2012]

“The Beast That Shouted Love”
aka "The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World"
by Harlan Ellison
First publication: Galaxy, Jun 1968

For me, this nontraditional story didn’t bring any clarity to the notion of evil—but perhaps that’s what was intended, to artistically portray the incomprehensible nature of evil. Still, even without clarity, it was worth reading the award-winning story of evil being distilled and somehow sent throughout time by two future aliens: it stretched my understanding of story and allow me to comprehend The Incredible Hulk #140.

 Seven dog-heads slept. 

[Dec 2013]

Slaughterhouse-Five
or the Children’s Crusade

by Kurt Vonnegut
First publication: 1969

Billy Pilgrim, a World War II veteran and sometimes zoo occupant on a far-off planet, lives one moment of his life, then he’s thrown back to another, then forward again, and so on amidst the sadness of what men do to each other in this deterministic and fatalistic universe.

 All this happened, more or less. The war parts, anyway, are pretty much true. One guy I knew really was shot in Dresden for taking a teapot that wasn’t his. Another guy I knew really did threaten to have his personal enemies killed by hired gunmen after the war. And so on. 

[Jan 1975]

“Praiseworthy Saur”
aka "If"
by Harry Harrison
First publication: If, Feb 1969
At least three lizards from the future (Numbers 17, 35 and 44) project themselves into the past to protect their remote ancestor.

 The centuries will roll by and, one day, our race will reach its heights of glory. 

[Jan 2014]

Magnus, Robot Fighter
created by Russ Manning
First time travel: Magnus, Robot Fighter #26, May 1969

There were times in the 60s when there simply weren’t enough Marvel comics, so I picked up the occassional issue of Magnus, including #26 where the nemesis of robots was stranded in the distant future.

 No robot may harm a human, or allow a human to come to harm... 
—from the splash page of Magnus #1—by the 60s, Asimov’s first law had become so ingrained that the good doctor was not cited as the source of the law

[May 2012]

“The Timesweepers”
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Aug 1969
I haven’t yet read this short story that Laumer expanded to the novel Dinosaur Beach in 1971, though perhaps some day I will spot the Ballantime paperback, Timetracks, that collecteded it along with four other stories.

Woody Woodpecker
created by Bugs Hardaway, Walter Lantz and Alex Lovy
First time travel: 1 Sep 1969


I found one cartoon where the screwball woodpecker travels back in time: “Prehistoric Super Salesman” from 1969 where Professor Grossenfibber needs a subject for his time tunnel.

 Now my time machine is all ready for the experiment. All I need is somebody...is somebody...ah, the woodpecker, ya! 

[Jul 2013]



The Svetz Stories
by Larry Niven
First story: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct 1969

I first read these stories in Didcot in 1980, collected in the UK edition of The Flight of the Horse. Perhaps these are not time travel (which Niven does not believe in), since whenever our svelte hero, Svetz, tries to retrieve an animal from the past, he ends up with a fantasy version instead. I haven’t yet read the 1999 Svetz novel, Rainbow Mars.

 Get a Horse (aka The Flight of the Horse) (Oct 1969)   F&SF 
Leviathon (Aug 1970)Playboy
Bird in the Hand (Oct 1970)F&SF
There’s a Wolf in My Time Machine (Kim 1071)F&SF
Death in a Cage (Sep 1973)in collection
Rainbow Mars (Mar 1999)novel

 He had come to get a horse; he had not expected to meet one at the door. How big was a horse? Where were horses found? Consider what the Institute had had to go on: a few pictures in a slavaged children’s book, and an old legend, not to be trusted, that the horse had once been used as a kind of animated vehicle! 

[Jul 1980]

Land of the Giants
created by Irwin Allen
First time travel: 21 Dec 1969


When a suborbital ship gets caught in a space storm, it ends up on a planet where everything and everyone is twelve times bigger than normal, providing fodder for adventure and at least two treks through time (“Home Sweet Home” on 12 Dec 1969, and “Wild Journey” on 8 Mar 1970).

The writing, acting and sets had little appeal to me, though I did enjoy Batgirl (Yvonne Craig) in “Wild Journey”, aka Marta, the green Orion dancer from the third season of Star Trek.

 But don’t you see: If we never take that flight out, there would have never been a crash, and the others would have never been stranded on this planet. 
—from “Wild Country”

[Dec 1969]

Quest for the Future
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: 1970


Hey, I got an idea! Let’s take three unrelated time-travel stories, change the name of the protagonist to be the same in all three, paste in some transition material, and call it a novel!

To be fair, I did enjoy this paperback when I bought it in the summer of 1970, but when I went to read van Vogt’s collected stories 42 years later, bits kept seeming familiar, which is when I discovered the truth. If I were a new reader, I’d just as soon read the individual stories and skip the conglomeration. The three stories are “Film Library,” “The Search” and “Far Centaurus” (all in van Vogt’s Transfinite collection).

 A new novel by “the undisputed idea man of the futuristic field” (to quote Forrest J. Ackerman) is bound to be an event of major interest to every science fiction reader. 
—from the back cover of the 1970 paperback

[Jul 1970]

“A Shape in Time”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: in The Future Is Now, 1970
Time-traveling, Marriage-prevention specialist Agent L-3H has her first failure while trying to intervene in the 1880 marriage of Edwin Sullivan to Angelina Gilbert.

 Temporal Agent L-3H is always delectable in any shape; that’s why the Bureau employs her on marriage-prevention assignments. 

[Jan 2013]

Time and Again
by Jack Finney
First publication: 1970

Si goes back to 19th century New York to solve a crime and (of course) fall in love.

This is Janet’s favorite time-travel novel, in which Finney elaborates on themes that were set in earlier stories such as “Double Take.”

 There’s a project. A U.S. government project I guess you’d have to call it. Secret, naturally; as what isn’t in government these days? In my opinion, and that of a handful of others, it’s more important than all the nuclear, space-exploration, satellite, and rocket programs put together, though a hell of a lot smaller. I tell you right off that I can’t even hint what the project is about. And believe me, you’d never guess. 

[May 1990]

The Year of the Quiet Sun
by Wilson Tucker
First publication: 1970

Brian Chaney—researcher, translator, statistician, a little of this and that— is unwillingly drafted as the third member of a team (which includes Major Moresby and Lt. Commander Saltus) to study and map the central United States at the turn of the century, at about the year 2000.

For me, I see the tone of several later items, such as the tv show Seven Days, as descendants of Tucker’s novel—and we finally understand why the Terminator arrives at his destination naked.

 She said: “It’s a matter of weight, Mr. Chaney. The machine must propel itself and you into the future, which is an operation requiring a tremendous amount of electrical energy. The engineers have advised us that total weight is a critical matter, that nothing but the passenger must be put forward or returned. They insist upon minimum weight.”
    “Naked? All the way naked?”
 

[Apr 2013]

The Time Trap Series
by Keith Laumer
First book: Aug 1970

In these two books (Time Trap and Back to Time Trap), Roger Tyson is caught in a battle between aliens and time travelers from the future.

 ...it would be our great privilege to bring to the hypergalactic masses, for the first time in temporal stasis, a glimpse of life on a simpler, more meaningless, and therefore highly illuminating scale. I pictured the proud intellects of Ikanion Nine, the lofty abstract cerebra of Yoop Two, the swarm-awareness of Vr One-ninety-nine, passing through these displays at so many megaergs per ego-complex, gathering insights into their own early evolutionary history. I hoped to see the little ones, their innocent organ clusters aglow, watching with shining radiation sensors as primitive organisms split atoms with stone axes, invented the wheel and the betatron, set forth on their crude Cunarders to explore the second dimension... 

[Jan 2014]

Timeslip
created by Ruth Boswell and James Boswell
First aired: 20 Sep 1970

Serious Simon and Emotional Elizabeth use the Time Barrier to travel to different doctorwhoish pasts and presents, never meeting the Time Lord himself, of course, but sometimes meeting versions of themselves and their families.

 Oold Beth: Sometimes in life you have to make decisions and hope they come out for the best. You’ll know about that soon enough.
Young Liz: But I’ll never make your decisions, will I?
Oold Beth: Then how did I come to make them? We’re the same, Liz. But I’m like a person You’ll never be, and you’re like a person I never was, never. 
—from “The Time of the Ice Box”

[Jul 2012]

“One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty”
by Harlan Ellison
First publication: Orbit 8, Oct 1970
At 42, Gus Rosenthal is in a place of security, importance, recogntion—in short, the perfect time to dig up that toy soldier that he buried in his back yard 30 years ago with the knowledge that doing so will take him back to that time to be an influence on an angry, bullied 12-year-old Gus.

 My thoughts were of myself: I’m coming to save you. I’m coming, Gus. You won’t hurt any more...you’ll never hurt. 

[Dan 2012]

“The Weed of Time”
by Norman Spinrad
First publication: Alchemy and Academe, Nov 1970
Spinrad’s tale contains no traditional time travel, but it does have an interesting concept of a man for whom every event in his life happens simultaneously.

 They will not accept the fact that choice is an illusion caused by the fact that future time-loci are hidden from those who advance sequentially along the time-stream one moment after the other in blissful ignorance. 

[May 2014]

“The Ever-Branching Tree”
by Harry Harrison
First publication: Science Against Man, Dec 1970
A Teacher takes a group of disinterested children on a field trip through time to see the evolution of life.

 Yesterday we watched the lightning strike the primordial chemical soup of the seas and saw the more complex chemicals being made that developed into the first life foms. We saw this single-celled life triumph over time and eternity by first developing the ability to divide into two cells, then to develope into composite, many-celled life forms. What do you remember about yesterday? 

[May 2011]
The cover art was by Marvel Comics artist Jim Steranko.
“In Entropy’s Jaws”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Infinity Two, 1971

John Skein, a communicator who telepathically facilitates meetings between minds, suffers a mental overload that causes him to experience stressful flashbacks and flashforwards, some of which lead him to seek a healing creature in the purple sands and blue-leaved trees by an orange sea under a lemon sun.

 Time is an ocean, and events come drifting to us as randomly as dead animals on the waves. We filter them. We screen out what doesn’t make sense and admit them to our consciousness in what seems to be the right sequence. 

[Dec 2013]

The Partridge Family
“Albuquerque’ song by by Tony Romeo
First time travel (trust me): 26 Feb 1971 (“Road Song”)


I first noticed a Partridge Family time traveler in the song “Point Me in the Direction of Albuquerque” in which the young girl is obviously lost in time (although oddly, the key lyric line was omitted from the tv episode “Road Song”). If you listen closely, there are many other science fictional themes in the songs of Shirley Jones’s tv family, for example, the clones in One Night Stand (♫I wish that I could be two people♫) and, of course, the ubiquitous references to immortality (♫Could it be forever?♫).

 ♫Showed me a ticket for a Greyhound bus
Her head was lost in time
She didn't know who or where she was
And anyone that helps me is a real good friend of mi--i--ine♫
 

[Feb 1971]

Escape from the Planet of the Apes
by Paul Dehn (Don Taylor, director)
First release: 21 May 1971

Among the original Apes movies, only this one had true time travel; the others involved only relativistic time dilation, which (as even Dr. Milo knows) is technically not time travel. But in this one, Milo, Cornelius and Zira are blown back to the time of the original astronauts and are pesecuted in a 70s made-for-tv manner.

 Given the power to alter the future, have we the right to use it? 

[Jan 2012]

“Dazed”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Sep/Oct 1971
In 1950, a 25-year-old man begins to think that his own generation—those who will soon be in charge— are taking the world in an Orwellian direction because of an imbalance that’s occuring, so he writes a personal ad seeking help in rebalancing the world, and he gets an instant answer that, among other things, takes him a few decades into the future.

 When he was in Lilliput there was a war between the Lilliputians and another nation of little people—I forget what they called themselves—and Gulliver intervened and ended the war. Anyway, he researched the two countries and found they had once been one. And he tried to find out what caused so many years of bitter enmity between them after they split. He found that there had been two factions in that original kingdom—the Big Endians and the Little Endians. And do you know where that started? Far back in their history, at breakfast one morning, one of the king’s courtiers opened his boiled egg at the big end and another told him that was wrong, it should be opened at the small end! The point Dean Swift was making is that from such insignificant causes grow conflicts that can last centuries and kill thousands. Well, he was near the thing that’s plagued me all my life, but he was content to say it happened that way. What blow-torches me is—why. Why are human beings capable of hating each other over such trifles? Why, when an ancient triviality is proved to be the cause of trouble, don’t people just stop fighting? 

[Jul 2013]

Dinosaur Beach
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Sep 1971


Timesweep agent Ravel finds himself the only survivor of an attack on the Dinosaur Beach substation until his wife shows up, although their marriage still lies in her future.

 The Timesweep program was a close parallel to the space sweep. The Old Era temporal experimenters had littered the timeways with everything from early one-way timecans to observation stations, dead bodies, abandoned instruments, weapons and equipment of all sorts, including an automatic mining setup established under the Antarctic icecap which caused headaches at the time of the Big Melt. 

[Jan 2014]

There Will Be TIme
by Poul Anderson
First publication: 1972

The doctor and confidant of Jack Havig relates Jack’s life story from the time the infant started disappearing and reappearing to the extended firefight through time with the few other time travelers that Havig encountered.

 No, no, no. I suppose it’s simply a logical impossibility to change the past, same as it’s logically impossible for a uniformly colored spot to be both red and green. 

[Feb 2012]

“When We Went to See the End of the World”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Universe 2, Feb 1972
Nick and Jane are disappointed when they discover that they are not the only ones from their social group to have time-tripped to see some aspect or other of the end of the world.

 “It looked like Detroit after the union nuked Ford,” Phil said. “Only much, much worse.” 

[Jan 2012]

“Against the Lafayette Escadrille”
by Gene Wolfe
First publication: Again Dangerous Visions, Mar 1972

I’m a little surprised at how much I am enjoying Gene Wolfe’s stories. This short tale is the second of Gene Wolfe’s stories in The Time Traveler’s Almanac. It is a fantasy of a man who builds an exact replica of a Fokker triplane; then, one day on a flight, he sees a beautiful girl in a vintage balloon, an event that seems explicable only via time travel. In mood, the story puts me in the mood of Jack Finney’s wonderful non-time-travel story, “Home Alone.”

 I circled her for some time then, she turning slowly in the basket to follow the motion of my plane, and we talked as well as we could with gestures and smiles. 

[May 2014]

Slaughterhouse-Five
adaptation by Stephen Geller
First release: 15 Mar 1972

Billy Pilgrim’s life, unstuck in time, is faithfully brought to the big screen, including fellow patient Mr. Rosewater who, I believe, is reading a Kilgore Trout story.

 I have come unstuck in time. 

[Mar 2014]

“Forever to a Hudson Bay Blanket”
by James Tiptree, Jr.
First publication: Fantastic, Aug 1972
At 75, heiress Loolie Aerovulpa travels back to her nubile teenaged body to throw herself at her one true love, Dovy Rapelle.

 “Do you like me? I’m attractive, am’t I?” She opened the blanket to look at herself. “I mean, am I attractive to you? Oh, Dovy, s-say something! I’ve come so far, I chartered three jets, I, I,—Oh, Dovy d-darling! 

[Jul 1972]

“Proof”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Amazing, Sep 1972
Jackson, a reporter, wants proof that a time machine really works, and he also wouldn’t mind proof about who killed Seantor Burton 20 years ago.

 The Time Chamber. with its loose-hangingt power cables and confused-looking control panel, didn’t look much like Mr. Wells’ crystal bicycle. 

[Jun 2011]



The End of Time Series
by Michael Moorcock
First book: Oct 1972

Every now and then, a time traveler finds his way to the End of Time where a small group of decadent immortals manipulate matter and energy with power rings.

 1. An Alien Heat, Oct 1972Dancer Trilogy #1 
2. The Hollow Lands, 1974Dancer Trilogy #2
3. Pale Roses, 1974in New Worlds 7
4. The End of All Songs, Jul 1976Dancer Trilogy #3
5. White Stars, Mar 1975in New Worlds 8
6. Ancient Shadows, Nov 1975in New Worlds 9
7. Legends from the End of Time, 1976
     aka Tales from the End of Time
includes 3,5,6
 
8. Transformation of Miss Mavis Ming, Feb 1977
     aka A Messiah at the End of Time
Expands Constant Fire
 
9. The Dancers at the End of Time, 1981includes 1,2,4
10. Elric at the End of Time, Sep 1981in Elsewhen
11. The Murderer’s Song, Aug 1986in Tales/Forbidden Planet

 Our time travellers, once they have visited the future, are only permitted (owing to the proerties of Time itself) at best brief returns to their present. 

[Apr 2014]

“(Now + n, Now - n)”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Nova 2, Oct 1972
Investor Aram Kevorkian has the unique advantage that he can communicate with himselves 48 hours yore and 48 hours hence, until he falls in love with Selene who dampens his psychic powers and his trading profits.

 “Go ahead, (now + n),” he tells me. ((To him I am (now + n). To myself I am (now). Everything is relative; n is exactly forty-eight hours these days.)) 

[May 2012]

“Stretch of Time”
by Ruth Berman
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Oct 1972
Sylvia Fontis at Luna University has built a working time machine—she calls it the Dimensional Revolver—but she’s too scared to use it until Professor Kent comes up with an idea for an experiment.

 So what did you do, bring back the results of the Centauri Probe? Kill your grandmother? 

[Dec 2013]

The Brady Kids
directed by Hal Sutherland
First time travel: 16 Dec 1972

The kids, sans Alice and parents, starred in their own cartoon show with magical adventures including at least one time-travel incident where Marlon the wizard bird changes places with Merlin—all directed by Hal Sutherland, the soon-to-be director of the animated Star Trek.

 Boys: ♫Meet three sisters...
Girls: Now meet their brothers...
Marcia: Greg’s the leader and a good man for the job.
Jan: There’s another boy, by the name of Peter.
Cindy: The youngest one is Bob.
Boys: See our sisters: They’re all quite pretty.
Greg: First there’s Marcia, with her eyes a sparklin’ blue.
Peter: Then there’s Jan, the middle one, who’s really groovy,...
Bobby: And sister Cindy, too.
Boys: Let’s get set now for action and adventure, as we see things we never saw before.
Girls: We’ll meet Mop Top and Ping and Pong, the pandas, and Marlon who has voices by the score.
All: The Brady kids, the Brady kids, it’s the world of your friends the Brady kids.♫ 

[Dec 1972]

Frankenstein Unbound
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: 1973

When the weapons of war-torn 2020 open time slips that unpredictably mix places and times, grandfather Joe Boderland finds himself and his nuclear-powered car in 1816 Switzerland along with the seductive Mary Shelley, a maniacal Victor Frankenstein, and Frankenstein’s monster.

 You know, Joe, you are my first reader! A pity you don’t remember my book a little better! 

[Feb 2012]

The Man Who Folded Himself
by David Gerrold
First publication: 1973

Reluctant college student Danny Eakins inherits a time belt from his uncle, and he uses it over the rest of his life to come to know himself.

 The instructions were on the back of the clasp—when I touched it lightly, the words TIMEBELT, TEMPORAL TRANSPORT DEVICE, winked out and the first “page” of directions appeared in their place. 

[Dec 2010]





Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon Stories
by Spider Robinson
First story: Analog Science Fiction, Feb 1973

At Mike Callahan’s bar, the regulars listen to the tall tales of all time travelers (and others including aliens, vampires, talking dogs, etc.).

 The Guy with the Eyes (Feb 1973)Analog 
The Time-Traveler (Apr 1974)Analog
The Law of Conservation of Pain (Dec 1974)Analog
Two Heads Are Better Than One (May 1975)Analog
Unnatural Causes (Oct 1975)Analog
A Voice Is Heard in Ramah... (Nov 1975)Analog
The Centipede’s Dilemma (1977)in Crosstime Saloon
Just Dessert (1977)in Crosstime Saloon
The Wonderful Conspiracy (1977)in Crosstime Saloon
Dog Day Evening (Oct 1977)Analog
Mirror/rorriM off the Wall (Nov 1977)Analog
Fivesight (Jul 1979)Omni
Have You Heard the One...? (Jun 1980)Analog
Pyotr’s Story (12 Oct 1981)Analog
Involuntary Man’s Laughter (Dec 1983)Analog
The Blacksmith’s Tale (Dec 1985)Analog
The Mick of Time (May 1986)Analog
The Paranoid (from Lady) (Winter 1988)in Pulphouse: Issue Two
Callahan’s Lady (1989)11 connected stories
Lady Slings the Booze (1991)aka Kill the Editor
The Callahan TouchMary’s Place book
The Immediate Family (Jan 1993)Analog
The End of the Painbow (Jul 1993)Analog
Off the Wall at Callahan’s1994
Callahan’s Legacy (1996)collection of quotes
Post Toast (circa 1996)USENET group alt.callahans
Callahan’s Key (2000)new novel
Callahan’s Con (2003)new novel
Too Hot Too Hoot (from Legacy) (Oct 2006)in This Is My Funniest

 And as Callahan refilled glasses all around, the time traveler told us his story. 

[Jul 1973]

“Linkage”
by Barry N. Malzberg
First publication: Demon Kind, Mar 1973
Donald Alan Freem is only eight, but he’s been institutionalized because of delusions that a time-traveling alien gave him the power to make people do whatever he wants.

 I made you say that. 

[Jul 2013]





Mad Magazine Movie Spoofs
starring by Alfred E. Newman
First time travel spoof: Mar 1973

As a kid, there were always too many comic books to read for me to have much interest in Mad, but in later years, I enjoyed the time-travel movie spoofs (though I’m unsure whether all the spoofs actually included time travel).

 The Planet That Went Ape and its sequels (Mar 1973) 
Superduperman: The Movie (Jul 1979)
Bleak for the Future (Jan 1986)
Peggy Got Stewed and Married (Apr 1987)
Star Blecch IV: The Voyage Bombs (Jun 1987)
Bleak for the Future Part II (Jun 1990)
Iterminable Too Misjudgment Day (Jan 1992)
Groundhog Deja Vu (Sep 1993)
Star Blecch: Worst Contact (Dec 1996)
Corntact (Nov 1997)
Planet of the Remakes (Nov 2001)
Interminable 3 Rise of the Bad Scenes (Aug 2003)

 For some reason which will never be satisfactorily explained, I have been transported back in time to 1960! I must remember that I’m now eighteen and not forty-three! It’s great to be young again and be back in the good old days when I had nothing to worry about except SAT’s...and acne...braces...and being flat chested and living with insensitive parents...and...hey, get me out of here and back to the present! 
—from Peggy Got Stewed and Married

[Jan 1986]

“Paths”
by Edward Bryant
First publication: Vertex, Apr 1973
A traveler from the future makes his way to Morisel’s office to warn the reporter about the consequences of continued mindless rape of the environment.

In addition to acknowledging that Ed Bryant’s stories are among my favorites, I can also add that he is a kind and generous mentor to writers in the Denver area, including myself!

 I don’t want to seem cynical. You may be my ten-times-removed egg-father or something, but right now it’s awfully hard not to believe you’re just a run-of-the-mill aberrant. I mean, here you crawl into my office close to midnight, spread yourself down, and then calmly announce you’re a traveler from the future. 

[Jul 2013]

Time Enough for Love
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Jun 1973


During his 2000 years of misadventures, Lazarus Long has loved and lost and loved again, so now he’s to die, unless Minerva can think of an exciting adventure: perhaps visiting his own childhood?

 This sad little lizard told me he was a brontosaurus on his mother’s side. I did not laugh, people who boast of ancestry often have little else to sustain them. Humoring them costs nothing and adds to happiness in a world in which happiness is always in short supply. 

[Dec 1973]



Pendulum Classics’ The Time Machine
aka Marvel Classics Comics #2
adapted by Otto Binder and Alex Niño
First publication: Jun 1973

There’s a papal dispensation (straight from Clifford Simak) that allows me to list all comic book adaptations of The Time Machine, even if they appeared after 1969. This Alex Niño version was printed as a small black and white graphic novel at least twice (Pendulum Press B&W 1973 and Academic Industries Pocket Classics 1984,). I haven’t seen it directly, but I recently found out that it was colored and printed as the second issue of the Marvel Classics series, which I first read in Pullman in early 1976. The storyline follows the 1960 movie closely.

 As a trial, I’ll just pull the future lever a short ways. 

[Jan 1976]

“12:01 P.M.”
by Richard Lupoff
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sep 1973


Myron Castleman is reliving 59 minutes of one day over and over for eternity.

 And Myron Castleman would be permitted to lie forever, piling up experiences and memories, but each of only an hour’s duration, each resumed at 12:01 PM on this balmy spring day in Manhattan, standing outside near the Grand Central Tower. 

[Jan 2012]

Star Trek: The Animated Series
directed by Hal Sutherland and Bill Reed
First time travel: 15 Sep 1973


This series has a special place in my heart because of the day in 1974 when Dan Dorman and I visited Hal Sutherland north of Seattle to interview him for our fanzine, Free Fall. He treated the two teenagers like royalty and made two lifelong fans.

I think the series had only one time-travel story, “Yesteryear” (written by D.C. Fontana), which was the second in Sutherland’s tenure. In that episode, Spock returns from a time-traveling mission to find that he’s now in a reality where he died at age 7, and hence he returns to his own childhood to save himself.

 Captain’s Log, Supplemental: When we were in the time vortex, something appears to have changed the present as we know it. No one aboard recognizes Mr. Spock. The only answer is that the past was—somehow—altered. 

[Sep 1973]

“Road Map”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Clairion III, Oct 1973
When Ralph Ascione dies, he is reincarnated as a female baby—but in what year and exactly which female?

 A new sound came; in the blurred distances, something moved. Vaguely seen, a huge face looked over him and made soft, deep clucking noises. Then he understood. 

[Nov 2010]

“Big Game”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Before the Golden Age, 1974
Jack Trent hears a half-drunken story of time travel and the real cause of the dinosaur extinction.

Asimov wrote this story in 1941, but it was lost until I found it in the Boston University archives in the early ’70s. Okay, maybe that fan who found it wasn’t me, but it could have been!

 Jack looked at Hornby solemnly. “You invented a time machine, did you?”
   “Long ago.” Hornby smiled amiably and filled his glass again. “Better than the ones those amateurs at Stanford rigged up. I’ve destroyed it, though. Lost interest.”
 

[Oct 1974]

“A Little Something for Us Tempunauts”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: Final Stage, 1974

Addison Doug and his two fellow time travelers seem to have caused a time loop wherein everyone is reliving the same events with only vague memories of what happened on the previous loop.

 Every man has more to live for than every other man. I don’t have a cute chick to sleep with, but I’d like to see the semi’s rolling along the Riverside Freeway at sunset a few more times. It’s not what you have to live for; it’s that you want to live to see it, to be there—that’s what is so damn sad. 

[Jun 2011]

“The Marathon Photograph”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Threads of Time, 1974
I feel for one character in this story: Humphrey, who wants no more than to figure out the various goings on—past, present and possibly future—in this out-of-the-way place where Andrew Thornton comes to fish and write a geology text, Andrew’s friend Neville Piper finds a cube with the a hologram of the Battle of Marathon alongside the bear-maulted body of the mysterious Stefan from the even more mysterious Lodge, and that long-lost mine that Humphrey has been researching is finally found without Humphrey ever being told of it.

 Humphrey did mind, naturally, but there was nothing he could do about it. Here was the chance to go up to the Lodge, probably to go inside it, and he was being counted out. But he did what he had to do with fairly good grace and said that he would stay. 

[Feb 2013]

“Master Ghost and I”
by Barbara Softly
First publication: The Tenth Fontana Book of Great Ghost Stories, 1974
A 17th century soldier inherits a house with a squatter from the future.

 “D-dark?” he stammered. “I’ll switch on the light.” 

[Jan 2014]

CBS Mystery Radio Theater
created by Himan Brown
First time travel: 31 Jan 1974



The fun mp3 files include radio news, weather, commercials and more from the 70s, all surrounding the mystery story hosted by E.G. Marshall. Here are the time-travel episodes that I’ve found so far, including two (in July 1976 and March 1977) by Grand Master Alfred Bester.

 The Man Who Asked for Yesterday (31 Jan 1974)to the previous day 
Yesterday’s Murder (27 Jun 1974)heroine redoes her life
Come Back with Me (2 Jul 1975)hero relives favorite times
Assassination in Time (26 Sep 1975)to Lincoln’s assasination
The Lap of the Gods (25 Nov 1975)sea captain in the 1820s
A Connecticut Yankee... (8 Jan 1976)to Camelot
There’s No Business Like (19 Jan 1976)to 2076
The Covered Bridge (23 Mar 1976)a feminist to the 1770s
Time Killer (5 Apr 1976)before Great Depression
Future Eye (19 Jul 1976)2976 detective to 1976
Now You See Them, Now You Don’t (12 Mar 1977)back from World War V
A Point of Time (15 Nov 1977)overthrow dictator in 2200
The Time Fold (16 Mar 1978)from 1979 to far future
Time Out of Mind (18 May 1978)to World War II
The Winds of Time (16 Oct 1978)heroine secures closure
The Time Box (18 Feb 1980)to the 1880s
The Man of Two Centuries (29 Apr 1981)Huron travels centuries
The Old Country (24 Mar 1982)back to World War II

 This is our bicentennial year: a time to pause and count our blessings. And among the greatest of these are the men and women of letters who flourished in our native land, who created a literature that was both typically American and universally admired. 
—host E.G. Marshall in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

[Jan 1974]

“If Ever I Should Leave You”
by Pamela Sargent
First publication: Worlds of If, Feb 1974
A nameless narrator (called Nanette by an overly zealous copy-editor in the If publication) tells of time-traveler Yuri’s return as a dying old man and of the subsequent times when she visited him. I enjoyed that beginning part of the story, but the ending, as the narrator herself ages, spoke to me more deeply.

I met Pamela Sargent in Lawrence, Kansas, at Jim Gunn’s writing workshop. She was insightful and kind to the writers her came to learn from her and other talented writers.

 All the coordinates are there, all the places and times I went to these past months. When you're lonely, when you need me, go to the Time Station and I’ll be waiting on the other side. 

[Apr 2014]

Future Tense
created by Eli Segal
First time travel: 7 May 1974



Professor Eli Segal and her students at Western Michigan College created quality new productions of radio shows that were mostly taken from old episodes of X Minus One and Dimension X. According to otr.org, the first season of Future Tense 18 stories (13 based on X-1 scripts, two based on DX scripts, and 3 original scripts) and these first aired as 16 episodes in May of 1974. The second season had ten episodes (8 based on X-1 scripts and 2 original scripts) which aired in July 1976, At least three episodes involved time travel. Now why couldn’t I have gone to WMC?

 The Old Die Rich (7 May 1974)sleuth forced into time machine 
The Discovery of Morniel Mathaway (July 1976)   art critic from 25th century
An Imbalance of Species (July 1976)from “A Sound of Thunder’

 Stay tuned now for excitement and adventure in the world of the future! Entertainment for the entire family produced right here in Kalamazoo. 

[Jan 2012]

“The Birch Clump Cylinder”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Stellar 1, Sep 1974

When a contraption drops onto the Coon Creek Institute causing various objects to appear and disappear from out of time, Old Prather calls together three former students: someone with expertise in time travel (our discredited time-travel researcher and narrator, Charley Spencer), one who’s a mean-spirited, world-famous mathematician (Leonard Asbury), and with no preconceptions about the matter (the lovely composer, Mary Holland, who broken more than one heart on the campus).

 A time machine has fallen into a clump of birch just above the little pond back of the machine shops. 

[Feb 2013]

“Renaissance Man”
by T.E.D. Klein
First publication: Space 2: A Collection of Science Fiction Stories, 5 Sep 1974
When the new time machine randomly grabs a random man from the future, all the waiting bigwigs and reporters are delighted that they managed to catch a scientist for the six-hour interview.

 We knew we’d pull back someone from the Harvard Physics Department, because we’re here in the building right now. But it could have been just anyone. We might have found ourselve questioning a college freshman...Or a scrubwoman...Or even a tourist visiting the lab. 

[Jul 2013]

“Retroflex”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Vertex, Oct 1974
Haldene tracks down a man named Cochrane, who turns out to be a killer from the future.

 The one calling himself Cochrane is not of this era, but of a time far forward. 

[Jun 2011]

“If This Is Winnetka, You Must Be Judy”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Universe 5, Nov 1974
Larry Garth skips from year to year in his life (not linearly, of course), waiting to meet his once and future wife, Elaine.

 He lit a cigarette and leafed through the cards and minutiae that constituted his identity in the outside world. Well. . .knowing himself, his driver’s permit would be up-to-date and all credit cards unexpired. The year was 1970. Another look outside: autumn. So he was thirty-five, and the pans clattered at the hands of Judy. 

[Jan 2011]
The story also appeared in the 1979 anthology, The Gollancz/Sunday Times Best SF Stories
“Let’s Go to Golgotha!”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Sunday Times Weekly Review, 15 Dec 1974

A typical family of four decide to go with their best friends to see the cruxifiction of Jesus.

 If you’re talking about time-tours, why don’t you come with us? We’re going to see the Cruxifiction. 

[Jan 2014]



Sesame Street
created by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett
First aired: 20 Dec 1974


From his early days, Kermit brought news reports to Sesame Street. I don't know when he first reported from back in history, so I’ll arbitrarily say that the first one was his interview of Christopher Columbus in Episode 700 shortly before Christmas in 1974.

In the 35th anniversary special, “The Street We Live On,” Grover takes Elmo on a trip through time to see how the street was in the past. Also, in a PBS special, “Elmo Saves Christmas,” the red guy visits a future Christmas.

 Columbus: But, say, what time is it?
Kermit: Oh, it’s about, ah, 1492. 

[Dec 1974]

“Trying to Connect You”
by John Rowe Townsend
First publication: The Eleventh Ghost Book, 1975
A man realizes the mistake he made with Elaine, and he desperately searches for a phone booth to call her before she leaves the country forever, but others want the phone booth, too, for a series of disasters that haven’t yet happened.

 Twenty-four hours after I left her, I knew I was wrong and knew what I should have said. 

[Jul 2013]

“Anniversary Project”
by Joe Haldeman
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Oct 1975

One million years after the invention of writing, Three-Phasing (nominally male) brings a 20th century man and his wife forward in time to teach the ancestors of man how to read.

 “Pleasta Meetcha, Bob. Likewise, Sarah. Call me, uh...“ The only twentieth-century language in which Three-phasing’s name makes sense is propositional calculus. “ George. George Boole.” 

[Jul 2011]

“Timetipping”
by Jack Dann
First publication: Epoch, Nov 1975

People, animals (or at least parts of them), and a reluctant wandering Jew are tossed back and forth through alternate realities at various times.

 Nothing was for certain, anything could change (depending on your point of view), and almost anything could happen, especially to forgetful old men who often found themselves in the wrong century rather than on the wrong street. 

[Jul 2011]

The Chronopaths Stories
by Steven Utley
First story: Galaxy Science Fiction, Jan 1976

I’ve read only the first of this series of stories which predates Utley’s better known Silurian tales. The first-person narrator, Bruce Holt, tells of his power (which he didn’t ask for and has no control over) of traveling through time and being deposited in other beings’ minds for a brief few seconds at a time.

 Getting Away (Jan 1976)Galaxy 
Predators (Oct 1976)The Ideas of Tomorrow
To 1966 (Spring 1977)Chacal
Spectator Sport (Jul 1977)Amazing Stories
The Maw (Jul 1977)F&SF
Time and Hagakure (Winter 1977) Asimov’s
Where or When (Jan 1991) Asimov’s
The Glowing Cloud (Jan 1992) Asimov’s
Now That We Have Each Other (Jul 1992)   Asimov’s
One Kansas Night (Jun 1994) Asimov’s
Living It (Aug 1994) Asimov’s
Staying in Storyville (Dec 2006)in When or Where
Life’s Work (Dec 2006)in When or Where
The Here and Now (Mar 1998) Asimov’s

 What do you want me to do? Go back and find out where Captain Kidd buried his loot? 
—“Getting Away”

[Dec 2013]

“Birth of a Notion”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Amazing, Apr 1976

The world’s first time traveler, Simeon Weill, goes back to 1925 and gives some ideas to Hugo.

 That the first inventor of a workable time machine was a science fiction enthusiast is by no means a coincidence. 

[Apr 1976]

“Balsamo’s Mirror”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1976
MIT student W. Wilson Newbury has a creepy Lovecraftian friend who is enamored with the 18th century, so naturally they visit an Armenian gypsy who makes them passengers in the bodies of an 18th century pauper and his father.

This story gave me a game that I play of pretending that I have just arrived as a passenger in my own body with no control over my actions or observations. How long does it take to figure out who and where I am? So, I enjoyed that aspect of the story, but I have trouble reading phonetically spelled dialects.

 I didn’t say that we could or should go back to pre-industrial technology. The changes since then were inevitable and irreversible. I only said... 

[Apr 2012]
1982 paperback edition
“Room 409”
by Nance Donkin
First publication: A Handful of Ghosts, Nov 1976
A thirteen-year-old Australian boy on vacation in England gets a key to a room that existed during World War II but no longer does.

 He didn’t seem to fit in at all well with the modern decor of the place, but I got the key from him and went towards the lift. 

[Dec 2013]
The story also appeared in this 1996 collection.
“Execution”
by George Clayton Johnson
First publication: Scripts and Stories written for “The Twilight Zone”, 1977
A man without conscience who’s about to be hung in 1880 is transported to a scientist’s lab in 1960.

Serling turned Johnson’s story into a 1960 Twilight Zone episode, but I’m uncertain whether the story was published before Johnson’s 1977 restrospective collection. Johnson is also well-known for Logan’s Run, with Jenny Agutter but (sadly) no time travel.

 Commonplace, if somewhat grim, unsocial event known as a necktie party. The guest of dishonor, a cowboy named Joe Caswell, just a moment away from a rope, a short dance several feet off the ground, and then the dark eternity of all evil men. Mr. Joe Caswell who, when the good Lord passed out a conscience, a heart, a feeling for fellow man, must have been out for a beer and missed out. Mr. Joe Caswelll, in the last quiet moment of a violent life. 
—Opening narration of the Twilight Zone episode

[Feb 2012]

The Crisis Stories
by James Gunn
First story: Analog Science Fiction, Mar 1977
Bill Johnson travels from the future to affect important political change at moments of crisis, but each time he makes a change, he also forgets all personal details about himself.

 Child of the Sun (Mar 1977)Analog 
The End of the World    (Jan 1984)Analog
Man of the Hour (Oct 1984)Analog
Mother of the Year (Apr 1985)Analog
Touch of the Match (Feb 1985)Analog
Will of the Wisp (May 1985)Analog
Crisis! (May 1986)fix-up novel

 But each time you intervene, no matter how subtly, you change the future from which you came. You exist in this time and outside of time and in the future, and so each change makes you forget. 

[Jul 2013]

“Air Raid”
by John Varley
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Spring 1977

Mandy snatches doomed people from the past in order to populate her war-decimated time.

 I had to choose between a panic if the fathead got them to thinking, and a possible panic from the flash of the gun. But when a 20th gets to talking about his “rights” and what he is “owed,&rdauo; things can get out of hand. 

[Jul 1977]

Star Wars
by George Lucas (Lucas, director)
First release: 25 May 1977

I’m just checking that you’re awake. Of course, in Star Wars, time travel no there is. Nevertheless, it gets onto the list simply because the fan-friendly George Lucas instigated an inclusive advertising campaign that sent me a colorful pressbook and an invitation to the opening in May 1977 because (along with Paul Chadwick and Dan Dorman) I was publishing an sf fanzine called Free Fall. Alas, I couldn’t use the invitation because I was falling in love with Janet in Scotland on the day of the premiere.

 I find your lack of faith disturbing. 

[Jul 1977]

“Rotating Cylinders and the Possibility of Global Causality Violation”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Aug 1977
A mathematician named Quifting has a way to use a time machine to end the war with the Hallane Regency once and for all.

 Did nobody ever finish one of these, ah, time machines? 

[Jul 2013]

Martin Gardner’s SF Puzzles
by Martin Gardner
First puzzle: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 1977 to 1986
Growing up, I read every Martin Gardner science book that I could lay my hands on. Janet even claims that I ignored her on our honeymoon in order to read Gardner’s Relativity for the Million (which is not true—it was The Ambidextrous Universe). Gardner was a colleague and friend of Asimov’s, which led to a series of sf puzzle stories beginning in the third issue of IASFM and continuing through November of 1986. As I spot various time travel adventures in these puzzles, I’ll add them to the list below.

 The Backward Banana (Jul 1980)Bananas grow younger 

 Somewhere in the text is a block of letters which taken forward spell the last name of a top science fiction author who has written about time travel. 
—from “The Backward Banana”

[1977]

The Orion Series
by Ben Bova
First story: Weird Heroes 8 (Nov 1977)
Orion the Hunter is tasked by mighty Ormazd to continually battle evil Ahriman, the Dark One. Bova’s first tale chronicles a time thousands of years in the past when Orion is part of a nomadic hunting clan that includes the beautiful Ana whom he has bonded with and loved throughout time.

 TitlePublication 
Floodtide (Nov 1977)in Weird Heroes 8
Orion (1984)incorporates “Floodtide”
Vengeance of Orion (1988)
Orion in the Dying Time (1990)
Orion and the Conqueror    (1984)
Orion among the Stars (1995)
Legendary Heroes (Dec 1996)Dragon Magazine
Orion and King Arthur (2012)

 But even from this distance I could see she was the gray-eyed woman I had known in other eras; the woman I had loved, thousands of years in the future of this world. The woman who had loved me. 
—“Floodtide”, reprinted in the March 1983 Analog

[Jun 2013]



DC Superhero Cartoons
First time travel: 10 Dec 1977


As you know, I was forced to ban all post-1969 comic books from The List because comic books pretty much fell to pieces after that date. If I discover many more superhero cartoons like these ones, I will be forced to expand the ban.

 The Protector (10 Dec 1977)The All New Super Friends Hour 
The Time Trap (30 Sep 1978)Challenge of the Super Friends
New Kids in Town (31 Oct 1998)Superman
The Savage Time (9 Nov 2002)Justice League
Day of the Dark Knight! (2 Jan 2009)Batman: The Brave and the Bold   

 It is the fifth century, A.D., the place is Britain, and I am Merlin Ambrosius. 
—“The Day of the Dark Knight!”, Episode 4 of Batman: The Brave and the Bold

[Aug 2013]

The Mirror
by Marlys Millhiser
First publication: 1978
In 1978, 20-year-old Boulder woman exchanges places with her grandmother on the eve of their respective weddings.

Janet and I read this in April, 2011.

 Here, at last, was the man in Grandma Bran’s wedding picture in the hall. 

[Apr 2011]
The story also appeared in this 1986 collection.
“Threads of Time”
aka “The Threads of Time”
by C.J. Cherryh
First publication: Darkover Grand Council Program Book IV, 1978
Although I’ve enjoyed many of Cherryh’s novels (first suggested to me by my academic advisor, David B. Benson), this particular vignette was a plotless mishmash of alien artifact time-gates and time cops patrolling the baddies who would wipe out history as we (or the qhal) would know it.

 But never go back. Never tamper. Never alter the past. 

[Apr 2014]
I’m not sure when this commemorative plate was issued for the cartoon.
A Connecticut Rabbit in King Arthur’s Court
produced, directed and plagiarized by Chuck Jones
First airing: 23 Feb 1978

This half-hour Warner Brother’s cartoon was shown on tv a few times and then released on VHS as Bugs Bunny in King Arthur’s Court. With the help of Way Bwadbuwy, Bugs finds himself in Camelot, whereupon he brings about a dragon-powered steampunk age.

 Never again—never, never again—do I take travel hints from Ray Bradbury! Huh! Him and his short cuts! 

[Jun 2011]

Mastodonia
aka Catface
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Mar 1978

Asa Steele buys a farm near his boyhood farm in southwestern Wisconsin where the loyal Bowser and his simple friend Hiram talk to a lonely time-traveling alien who opens time roads for the three of them.

 Maybe it takes gently crazy people and simpletons and dogs to do things we can’t do. Maybe they have abilities we don’t have.... 

[Dec 1979]

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
by Douglas Adams
First time travel: BBC Radio, 29 Mar 1978

Apart from the original radio programs that I listened to in Stirling on my study abroad, the travails of Arthur Dent dodging Vogons never inflamed my passion—and I’m not quite sure where time travel slipped into the further radio shows, books, tv shows, movies and video games (which I won’t list here, apart from noting Tim’s favorite quote from The Restaurant at the End of the Universe: “There was an accident with a contraceptive and a time machine. Now concentrate!” Still, those original radio shows got me laughing, including the first moment of time travel in the 4th episode.

The radio series spawned six books and at least one time-travel infused short story.

 The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1979) 
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980)
Life, the Universe and Everything (1982)
So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (1984)
“Young Zaphod Plays It Safe” (1986)in The Hitchhiker’s Quartet
Mostly Harmless (1992)
And Another Thing... (2009)by Eoin Colfer

 For instance, at the very moment that Arthur Dent said, “I seem to be having this tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle,” a freak wormhole opened up in the fabric of the space-time continuum and carried his words far, far back in time across almost infinite reaches of space, to a distance galaxy where strange and war-like beings were poised on the brink of frightful interstellar battle. 
—from the 4th radio episode

[Mar 1978]

“Stalking the Timelines”
by Kevin O’Donnell, Jr.
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Sep 1978
A catlike being lives the life of a soldier in many different times and places, but always with the same goal of stamping out war.

 ...but in all the lines I’m big, tough, and smart enough to know how to take good orders and not hear bad ones. 

[Jun 2013]


Mork and Mindy lived at 1619 Pine Street in Boulder

Mork and Mindy
produced by Anthony W. Marshall and Garry Marshall
First time travel: in reruns of 14 Sep 1978 episode

According to Wikipedia, there is a scene in the first episode where Mork explains that he's traveling from the 1950s Happy Days to 1978—but that scene did not air until subsequent reruns. The other time travel that I know of is in the penultimate episode where the couple travel via Mork's ruby red, size eight, time-travel shoes.

 Wait! I have one last request! I would like to die with dignity, with honor,...and with my penny-loafers on. 

[Nov 2013]

“Fair Exchange?”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine, Fall 1978
John Sylva has invented a temporal transference device that allows his friend Herb to enter the mind of a man in 1871 London and to thereby attend three performances of a lost Gilbert & Sullivan play.

I read this story as I was starting my graduate studies in Pullman in 1978. Sadly, there was no second issue of Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine.

 We can’t be sure how accurate our estimates of time and place are, but you seem to resonate with someone in London in 1871. 

[Sep 1978]

“Time Warp”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Omni, Oct 1978

On the hidden planet of Ceer, Althair tells all the little pups and pammies of the time when he accompanied the brave Will Hawkins and the chief pilot Jonna Verret as they traveled back in time to save Earth from the Meercaths from Orel who had the power to blow up the Earth and would use it whether the Earthlings revealed the secret of time travel or not.

 We’ll arrive on Orel before they leave and stop them. 

[Feb 2013]

Superman: The Movie
by Mario Puzo, et. al. (Richard Donner, director)
First release: 12 Oct 1978


The humor didn’t quite click for me, but I did enjoy other parts including Christopher Reeve, Gene Hackman, the John Williams score, and a well-presented Superman mythos including his first time-travel rebellion against the don’t-mess-with-history edict of Jor-El.

 In times of fear and confusion, the job of informing the public was the responsibility of the Daily Planet, a great metropolitan newspaper whose reputation for clarity and truth had become the symbol for hope in the city of Metropolis... 

[Oct 1978]

Classics Illustrated’s The Time Machine
adapted by Wallace C. Bennett
First aired: 5 Nov 1978



For me, the updated framing took this made-for-tv movie too far away from the original novel, and the production values were so low that it never got much airing, even if we do get looks at pilgrim witch hunts, the old west, and a dreamy Weena who speaks English.

 In tonight’s Classics Illustrated presentation, a young scientist hurtles the barrier of time and finds himself locked in a struggle to prevent the destruction Earth in the world of the future—an exciting new version of H.G. Wells’s masterpiece, The Time Machine. 

[Jul 2012]

“The Humanic Complex”
by Ray Russell
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1978
An amnesiac receives a visit from a tiny creature from the future who offers to grant him any three wishes he wants, but somehow the wishes keep being deflected in a theological direction.

 This may sound pompous, but...I wish to know whether or not there is a God. 

[Jul 2013]

“Palely Loitering”
by Christopher Priest
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 1979
At age ten, Mykle jumps off the time-flux bridge at a sharp angle and goes far into the future where he sees a lovely girl named Estyll, and as he grows older, he is drawn to the future and to her over and over again.

 One of these traversed the Channel at an angle of exactly ninety degrees, and to walk across it was no different from crossing any bridge across any ordinary river.

One bridge was built slightly obtuse of the right-angle, and to cross it was to climb the temporal gradient of the flux-field; when one emerged on the other side of the Channel, twenty-four hours had elapsed.

The third bridge was built slightly acute of the right-angle, and to cross to the other side was to walk twenty-four hours into the past. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow existed on the far side of the Flux Channel, and one could walk at will among them.
 

[Jul 2013]

Happy Days
created by Garry Marshall
First time travel: 6 Mar 1979

Some time after this show jumped the shark, Mork (who made his first appearance here in a 1978 episode) returns from the 70s to visit Richie and the gang, where they want to know about cars and girls of the future.

 In 1979...both are faster. 

[Nov 2013]

“Loob”
by Bob Leman
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1979

Tom Perman remembers his home town differently, but in his actual life, the town is run-down and neither his grandmother nor her elegant house exist—a situation Tom can explain only through changes made to the past by loob, the town idiot; although ironically, it’s only through those changes that Loob himself even exists.

 Their only dreams are of winning prizes on television giveaway shows. 

[May 2014]

“The Agent”
by Christopher Priest with David Redd
First publication: Aries 1, 28 Jun 1979
Egon Rettmer—citizen of neutral Silte, but an agent for the Nord-Deutschland in their war against the Masurians—uses time travel for his communiques and, as he realizes on the eve of the N-D invasion, there’s the potention to use it for more, maybe even to get a good start with that entrancing visitor, Heidi.

 She was behaving towards him, literally, as if he had been in two places at once...as if, this morning, he had met her and told her of the escape plans he had only half started to form a few minutes ago! 

[Jul 2013]

Kindred
by Octavia E. Butler
First publication: Jul 1979

Dana Franklin, a 26-year-old African-American woman living in modern-day California, finds herself transported back to the antebellum south whenever young redheaded Rufus is in trouble.

 Fact then: Somehow, my travels crossed time as well as distance. Another fact: The boy was the focus of my travels—perhaps the cause of them. 

[Nov 2013]

“The Merchant of Stratford”
by Frank Ramirez
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 1979
The world’s first time traveler sets out to visit a retired Will Shakespeare, carrying a long a case of books that he hopes will be a unique treat for the immortal bard.

 In my storage case were volumes for his perusal—a concise history of the world through the year 2000, a selection of the greatest poets since the master, selected volumes of Shakespearean criticism, and the massive one-volume Armstead Shakespeare, the definitive Shakespeare, published in 1997. 

[Sep 2014]

Xanth
by Piers Anthony
First time travel: Jul 1979

Deborah Baker first introduced me to this series of books in 1982, and I read the first nine in the 1980s. The books are set in a pun-infested world in which people have individual magic powers that they must discover. The first time travel that I remember was in the 1979 Castle Roogna where characters could step into a tapestry that took them to the past.

 It was embroidered with scenes from the ancient past of Castle Roogna and its environs, eight hundred years ago. 

[Sep 1982]

Time after Time
by Nicholas Meyer, Karl Alexander and Steve Hayes (Meyer, director)
First release: 31 Aug 1979

Apart from the hero in The Time Machine movie, this is the earliest that I’ve seen of the “H.G. Wells as time traveler” subgenre. Our hero chases Jack the Ripper into the 20th century.

 Ninety years ago I was a freak; today I am an amateur. 
—Jack the Ripper in the twentieth century

[Sep 1979]

Roadmarks
by Roger Zelazny
First publication: Oct 1979

As Red Dorakeen tries to avoid assassination, he travels on a highway that links all times via mutable exits that appear every few years.

There are other Zelazny works that drew me in much deeper (try Seven Princes of Amber). Still, Roadmarks has some interesting techniques. For example, Zelazny said that the second of the two storylines, which take place off the Road, was written as separate chapters and then shuffled into no particular order.

 It traverses Time—Time past, Time to come, Time that could have been and Time that might yet be. It goes on forever, so far as I know, and no one knows all of its turnings. 

[Aug 2012]

“Life Trap”
by Barrington J. Bayley
First publication: The Seed of Life, Nov 1979
Marcus, an aspirant to the highest rank afforded to members of the Arcanum Temple, undergoes an experiment to determine what awaits us after death, and the answer certainly involves time in a macabre manner.

 Although the secret of death has been imparted to the full membership of the Temple, not all have understood its import. 

[Apr 2014]

“Closing the Timelid”
by Orson Scott Card
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1979
Centuries in the future, Orion throws an illicit party in which the partygoers get to experience complete death in the past.

 Ah, agony in a tearing that made him feel, for the first time, every particle of his body as it screamed in pain. 

[Jul 2004]


Sadly, Galactica 1980 had neither Laurette Spang...

...nor Jane Seymour

Galatica 1980
created by Glen A. Larson
First (and only?) time travel: 10 Feb 1980


I eagarly awaited the reboot of Battlestar Galactica in 1980, shortly before I left to join my soon-to-be wife in England. Sadly, the reboot was a disappointment: poor plots, poor characters, the same few seconds of special effects and explosions endlessly repeated—and not even Cassiopeia (Laurette Spang, whom I was in love with in 1978) or Serina (Jane Seymour, whom I am in love with now).

However, I later discovered one redeeming feature: Time travel in Part Three of the 1980 Galactica pilot show, when the warriers follow an evil scientist back to 1944 and foil his plot to give modern technology to the Nazis. I think this was the only hint of time travel in the Galactica franchise, although the same future wife whom I went to meet in 1980 now tells me that this bit of time travel may have planted a seed in writer Donald P. Bellisario for his later series, Quantum Leap.

 The great ship Galactica, majestic and loving, strong and protecting, our home for these many years we endured the wilderness of space. And now we near the end of our journey. Scouts and electronic surveillance confirm that we have reached our haven, that planet which is home to our ancestor brothers. Too many of our sons and daughters did not survive to share the fulfillment of our dream. We can only take comfort and find strength in that they did not die in vain. We have at last found Earth. 

[Jan 2013]

Thrice Upon a Time
by James P. Hogan
First publication: Mar 1980

In answer to his least favorite question, James Hogan explained (in the Jan 2006 Analog) that the idea for this novel came from an all night conversation with Charles Sheffield about the classic time-travel paradox of what happens if you send something back in time and the arrival of that thing is the very cause of you not sending said thing back in time. Much of the novel is a similar conversation between physicist Murdoch Ross, his friend Lee, and Murdoch’s Nobel Prize winning grandfather Charles who has invented a way to send messages through time.

 Suppose your grandfather’s right. What happens to free will? If you can send information backward through time, you can tell me what I did even before I get around to doing it. So suppose I choose not to? 

[Sep 2012]

“A Touch of Petulance”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Dark Forces, Aug 1980
On his way home on the train, Jonathan Hughes meets Jonathan Hughes + 20 years and receives a warning that his marriage to a lovely young bride will end in murder.

 Me, thought the young man. Why, that old man is ... me. 

[Mar 2012]

The Final Countdown
by Hunter, Powell, Ambrose, Davis (Peter Vincent Douglas, director)
First release: 1 Aug 1980

Observer Warren Lasky is aboard the U.S.S. Nimitz when a storm takes her back to World War II, and then they are returned to the present before they can do anything vaguely cool.

 Today is December 7, 1941. I’m sure we are all aware of the significance of this date in this place in history. We are going to fight a battle that was lost before most of you were born. This time, with God’s help, it’s going to be different.... Good Luck. 

[Dec 1990]



The Muppet Show
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 5 Aug 1980