The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 1963



   鉄腕アトム
English title: Astro Boy (translated from Japanese)
created by Osamu Tezuka
First U.S. syndication: 1963

Astro Boy began as a Japanese comic (manga) in 1952 and then became an anime cartoon before anybody knew what anime was. The cartoons of the 21st century Pinocchioish robot boy were dubbed in English and syndicated in the U.S. starting in 1963. I do remember one time-travel episode in which Astro Boy stopped a time-traveling collector from the future who was after ancient animals and people for his zoo; and I suspect there was more time travel in the manga and later U.S. cartoons.

 Dads taking animals and plants and even people back with him to display in the 23rd century. 

—“Time Machine” (1963)




   Time Cat
by Lloyd Alexander
First publication: 1963

Jason’s cat, Gareth, calmly reveals that he can take Jason to nine different times, and the history lessons ensue.

 I can visit nine different lives. Anywhere, any time, any country, any century. 




   “Who Else Could I Count On?”
by Manly Wade Wellman
First publication: Who Fears the Devil?, 1963

Wellman’s tall-tales character of John the Balladeer has a conversation with an old man who came from forty years in the future to stop a terrible war.

 Ive come back to this day and time to keep it from starting, if I can. Come with me, John, well go to the rulers of this world. Well make them believe, too, make them see that the war mustnt start. 




   The Yesterday Machine
by Russ Marker (Marker, director)
First release: 1963

After the 1960 success of The Time Machine, how could you not predict a follow-up with this title. And a time machine. Plus teens who go where they know they shouldn’t go. And Nazis trying to change the outcome of World War II! And a director who also wrote the script. All indicators are pointing in the right direction.

 Margie [examining WARNING! KEEP OUT sign]: Oh, Howie, look. I dont think we oughta go on that property.
Howie: Look, you wanna get to the game, dontcha?
Margie: Of course I do!
Howie: Then come on . . .  


   “Myths My Great-Granddaughter Taught Me”
by Fritz Leiber
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 1963

A grandpa living in the Cold War era receives a visit from his great-granddaughter who wants to know details about Norse mythology.

 “That's right,” she told me, nodding. “Khrushchev was the giant Skymir, Im pretty sure. Jotunheim and Asgard are Russia and America, all set to shoot missles at each other across England and Europe, which must be Midgard, of course—though sometimes I think the English are the Vanir.” 


   “The Nature of the Place”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Feb 1963

Paul Dearborn is quite certain that he’ll go to hell, a prospect that bothers him in only one way: the uncertainty of what it will be.

And the only thing that bothers me is that I just had to read this in the month of my own sixtieth birthday. Oh, that no-goodnick Silverberg!

 He thought back over his sixty years. The betrayals, the disappointments, the sins, the hangovers. He had some money now, and by some standards he was a successful man. But life hadn't been any joyride. It had been rocky and fear-torn, filled with doubts and headaches, moments of complete despair, others of frustrated pain. 




   Brain Boy
created by Herb Castle and Gil Kane
First time travel: Brain Boy 4, Mar/May 1963

All you really need to be a superhero is to be really smart. That’s Brain Boy, and he battled a time machine in issue 4 (Mar/May 1963).

 And you havent asked what the late Professor Krisher was working on. It was the practical application of a theory of time travel! Going back in time—say to civil war days, or the days of the Roman Empire! 




  Time Traders #4
Key Out of Time
by Andre Norton
First publication: Mar 1963

Ross Murdock and Gordon Ashe take a team of telepathic dolphins and their Polynesian friend back in time to a water planet whose past may hold the key to the murderous time travelers who visited Earth long ago.

 Do you mean, have we changed the future? Who can answer that? 


   “The Histronaut”
by Paul Seabury
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1963

Political scientist Paul Seabury, an expert on U.S. foreign policy during the cold war, wrote just one sf story speculating on how a cadre of time travelers, one of whom is assigned to Vladimir Lenin, might become the next weapon of choice for the war-prevention strategy of mutually assured destruction.

Janet and I spent an enjoyable Saturday morning tracking down this single extant photo of Professor Seabury.

 As Professor Schlesinger pointed out, some Soviet historians doubtless were already preparing the assassination of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in Florida in 1933—so that the “historically necessary” contradictions of capitalism would emerge in the administration of President John Nance Garner. 


   “Now Wakes the Sea”
by J.G. Ballard
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, May 1963

At night, Richard Mason hears an ancient sea outside his house, a sea that has not existed for a thousand, thousand years; eventually, he is drawn to it.

 Off-shore, the deeper swells of the open sea surged across the roofs of the submerged houses, the white-caps cleft by the spurs of isolated chimnies. 


   A Hoax in Time
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Fantastic Stories of Imagination, Jun-Aug 1963

I haven’t yet read this serialized version that Laumer expanded to the novel The Great Time Machine Hoax in 1964, though I think this shorter version might have been published in the Armchair Fiction Double Novel 31 in 2011).



  
 of the Time at the Top Books

Time at the Top
by Edward Ormondroyd
First book: Jun 1963

When motherless young Susan Shaw stumbles into a seventh floor porthole to the 19th century where she meets two fatherless children, the story from seems predictable, but Ormondroyd (and I) still had fun with it. Of course, at the end we all assume that Susan’s success at dragging her father back to 1881 will have a happy ending at the alter—but wait! There’s a sequel.

 It had come to her that part of the seventh floor must have been converted in o a very realistic stage set, and that the woman and the girl had been rehearsing their parts in a play. But no, that couldnt be it. No stage set that she had ever seen was so realistic thatyoucould hear cows and smell flowers and feel the warmth of the sunlight. 


   “Flux”
by Michael Moorcock and Barrington J. Bayley
First publication: New Worlds, Jul 1963

When the government of the European Economic Community has no idea what to do next, they send Marshall-in-Chief Max File ten years into the future to find out the eventual effects of their actions.

Although this story was too abstract for my taste, I did enjoy the early presentation of what today might be called a Boltzmann Brain.

 The world from which he had come, or any other world for that matter, could dissipate into its component elements at any instant, or could have come into being at any previous instant, complete with everybodys memories! 




   Dr. Weird Comics
by Howard Keltner
First publication: Star-Studded Comics #1, Sep 1963

Dr. Weird was Howard Keltner’s creation, appearing in the first issue top comic book fanzine of the early 1960s, Star-Studded Comics. Although, George R.R. Martin claims he was unrelated to the contemporaneous Dr. Strange, both projected themselves into the astral plane to fight occult menaces. Weird’s menaces, though, were certainly darker—and he came from the future.

I don’t know whether any episodes after the origin included time travel.

 Slowly and warily, the Astral Avenger approached a huge black wall. His substance seemed to waver and fade as he passed effortlessly through it into the blackened inside. 

—from Martin’s prose Dr. Weird story, “Only Kids Are




   The Gasman Cometh
by Michael Flanders and Larry Swann
First aired: At the Drop of Another Hat, 2 Oct 1963

When Janet asked why I was listening to this favorite of hers one Saturday morning, I told her I was adding it to my time travel page. She just rolled her eyes and said, “I never would have guessed.”

 ’Twas on a Monday morning, the gasman came to call . . . 




   The Outer Limits
created by Leslie Stevens
First time travel: 14 Oct 1963

The original series ran only a season and a half with 49 episodes on the science fiction end of The Twilight Zone mold, but a full hour long. At least four episodes had some time travel.
  1. The Man Who Was Never Born (14 Oct 1963) back to stop a plague
  2. Controlled Experiment (13 Jan 1964) comedy pilot with time travel
  3. Soldier (19 Sep 1964) future soldier to 1964
  4. Demon with a Glass Hand (17 Oct 1964) aliens invade from future

 There is nothing wrong with your television set. Do not attempt to adjust the picture. We are controlling transmission. We will control the horizontal. We will control the vertical. We can change the focus to a soft blur or sharpen it to crystal clarity. For the next hour, sit quietly and we will control all that you see and hear. You are about to participate in a great adventure. You are about the experience the awe and mystery which reaches from the inner mind to . . . The Outer Limits! 




   Dr. Who
created by Sydney Newman, C.E. Webber, and Donald Wilson
First episode: 23 Nov 1963

Sadly, I’ve never been a vassel of the Time Lord, though I’ve seen his pull on his other subjects such as my student Viktor who gave me a run-down of the tv and movie series and spin-offs. In exchange, I guaranteed him at least a 4-star rating and he promised to never again mention the short story, comic book, audio book, radio, cartoon, novel, t-shirt, stage and coffee mug spin-offs.
  1. Dr. Who (23 Nov 1963 - 6 Dec 1989) original series
  2. Dr. Who and the Daleks (23 Aug 1965) theatrical movie
  3. Daleks’s Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D. (5 Aug 1966) theatrical movie
  4. K-9 and Company (28 Dec 1981) spin-off series
  5. P.R.O.B.E. The Zero Imperative (1994) direct-to-video
  6. P.R.O.B.E. The Devil of Winterborne (1995) direct-to-video
  7. P.R.O.B.E. Unnatural Selection (1996) direct-to-video
  8. P.R.O.B.E. Ghosts of Winterborne (1996) direct-to-video
  9. Dr. Who (12 May 1996) tv movie
  10. Dr. Who (26 Mar 2005 - present) series revival
  11. Torchwood (22 Oct 2006 - 15 Sep 2011) spin-off series
  12. The Sarah Jane Adventures (1 Jan 2007 - 18 Oct 2011) spin-off series
  13. K-9 and Company (31 Oct 2009 - 3 Apr 2010) spin-off series
  14. Counter-Measures (Jul 2012 - Jan 2014) audio spin-off
  15. Class (Dec 2016) spin-off aimed at teens

 Hard to remember. Some time soon now, I think. 

—The Doctor answering a police officer’s query as to his date of birth




   The Tree of Time
aka Beyond the Barrier
by Damon Knight
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1963—Jan 1964

Professor Gordon Naismith unexpectedly discovers that he’s a warrior Shefth from the future, and now the Uglies from the future wants him to return to kill an alien Zug who managed to get through the time barrier that’s meant to keep out the Zugs.

The full version, called Beyond the Barrier, was published shortly after the shortened two-part serial (about 45,000 words) appeared in F&SF.

 Let us say there was a need to be inconspicuous. This is a dead period, for hundreds of years on either side. No one knows about this abandoned liner except us, and no one would think of looking here. 


Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“Green Magic” by Jack Vance, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1963 [differing time rates ]

Glory Road by Robert A. Heinlein, F&SF, Jul–Sep 1963 [parallel universes ]

“The Right Time” by John Berryman, Analog, Dec 1963 [precognition ]

The Sword in the Stone by Bill Peet, 25 Dec 1963 [despite title, no time travel ]

 


22 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)