The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 1965

   “Famous First Words”
by Harry Harrison
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 1965

For the most part, this story is about a cantankerous inventor who merely listens in on past historical events—which, of course does not qualify as time travel. But there is that for-the-most-part part.

 Thor, will you please take care of . . . 




   The Flintstones
created by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera
First time travel: 15 Jan 1965

Everyone gathered around the tv to watch America’s favorite stone-age family on Flintstones night in the 60s. In one episode of their final season (“Time Machine”, the Flintstones and the Rubbles turn the tables on America by visiting the 1964 World’s Fair (among other times in the future).

 Oh, its marvelous, absolutely marvelous. You just step inside and I throw a lever. And things spin and lights go on and off, and you wind up somewhere in the future. 




   “The Kilimanjaro Machine”
aka “The Kilimanjaro Device”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Life, 22 Jan 1965

This story is Bradbury’s tribute to Hemingway, a time-traveling tribute told from the point of view of a reader who admired him and felt that his Idaho grave was wrong.

 On the way there, with not one sound, the dog passed away. Died on the front seat—as if he knew . . . and knowing, picked the better way. 






   Campfire Tales from Philmont Scout Ranch
by Al Stenzel
First publication: Boys’ Life, Mar 1965

A Navaho who steps through the cave finds himself at a vast inland sea; at first it is populated by dinosaurs, but each subsequent strip takes him to a later time.

Jon Shultis told me of this comic strip that told the tale of the Cave of Time in many of the Boys’ Life issues from March 1965 through March 1967.

 This is all wrong! If I dare change their stone age way of life, it may affect the whole future of their race. 




   “Double Take”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Playboy, Apr 1965

Jake Pelman is hopelessly in love with Jessica, the breathtaking star in a movie that he works on, but it takes a breathless trip to the 1920s for Jess to realize what her feelings for Jake might be.

 Out of the worlds three billion people there cant be more than, say, a hundred women like Jessica Maxwell. 


   “Man in His Time”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Science Fantasy, Apr 1965

Janet Westerman is trying to cope with the return of her husband Jack from a mission to Mars in which some aspect of the planet made it so that his sensory input now comes from 3.3077 minutes in the future.

 Dropping the letter, she held her head in her hands, closing her eyes as in the curved bone of her skull she heard all her possible courses of action jar together, future lifelines that annihilated each other. 




   “Wrong-Way Street”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Galaxy, Apr 1965

Ever since an accident that killed his eight-year-old brother, Mike Capoferri has been interested in time travel, and now he thinks one of the alien artifacts found on the moon is a time machine.

 Mike was a recent but ardent science-fiction fan. “I want to change it, Dr. Stuart,” he said earnestly. “I want to go back to four weeks ago and take away Tonys Flexy.” He meant it, of course. 






   The Corridors of Time
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Amazing, May-Jun 1965

While awaiting trial for a self-defense killing, young Malcolm Lockridge is approached by a wealthy beauty, Storm Darroway, who offers to defend him in return for him joining her in what he eventually finds out are Wars in Time between the naturalist Wardens and the technocrat Rangers.

For many years, I thought this novel was part of Poul’s Time Patrol series, until Bob Hasse mentioned this as one of his favorites that is not in the series. The beginning reminded me of Heinlein’s Glory Road, and the rest is remniscent of Asimov’s The End of Eternity, both of which captivated me in the summer of 1968. Poul’s book holds up well in that company.

 A series of parallel black lines, several inches apart, extended from it, some distance across the corridor floor. At the head of each was a brief inscription, in no alphabet he could recognize. But every ten feet or so a number was added. He saw 4950, 4951, 4952 . . . 




   My Favorite Martian
created by John L. Greene
First time travel: 20 Jun 1965

Three seasons with at least 8 time-travel episodes All time travel occurs with Martin’s CCTBS, a cathode-ray, centrifugal, time breakascope.
  1. Time Out for Martin (20 Jun 1965) to 1215 England
  2. Go West, Young Martian (12 Sep 1965) to 1849 St. Louis
  3. The Time Machine Is Waking Up . . . (21 Nov 1965)    Jesse James from 1870
  4. The O’Hara Caper (19 Dec 1965) back to lunchtime
  5. Heir Today, Gone Tomorrow (2 Jan 1966) to 1920/45 Cleveland
  6. When You Get Back Home . . . (27 Feb 1966) back to the morning
  7. Martin Meets His Match (27 Mar 1966) Da Vinci from 1400s
  8. Pay the Man the $24 (1 May 1966) to 1626 Manhattan

 What a planet for me to get marooned on. 




   Gorgo
by Joe Gill, Steve Ditko, Dick Giordano and ROcco Mastroserio
First time travel: Gorgo 23, Sep 1965

I don’t know which was conceived first: the movie version of Gorgo giant-monster-from-the-sea (who turns out to be a baby) or the comic book version, but the comic book version from Charlton first appeared in December 1959, whereas the movie wasn’t released until 1961. More importantly, however, the final issue of the comic (Gorgo 23, Sep 1965) has time travel when Dr. Hobart Howarth rescues Gorgo from an evil Pentagon attack by sending the giant lizard back to the late Jurassic.
Sadly, as a child, I bought only one Gorgo comic, which was not the time-travel issue, but the stories are definitely drawn by Steve Ditko, hooray!

 I, Senator Sam Brockton tell you this, my fellow citizens, the great danger to our world isnt communism it is Gorgo and the female that spawned him! 

Gorgo 16




   I Dream of Jeannie
created by Sidney Sheldon
First time travel: 25 Sep 1965

Five seasons with 3 time-travel episodes, all with Jeannie (who was the primary reason I wanted to be an astronaut).

Naturally, I never had any refined taste (as indicated by the Bronze Eloi Medal awarded tp Jeannie), but I was a product of my 60s childhood, and, besides, Jeannie (occassionly and briefly) had a belly button (including Season 5’s “Mrs. Djinn-Djinn”).
  1. My Hero? (25 Sep 1965) to ancient Babylon
  2. My Master, the Pirate (13 Mar 1967) to Captain Kidd’s time
  3. My Master, Napoleon’s Buddy (3 Apr 1967)    to Napoleaon's time

 Were at the marketplace, master. Oh, and there is Ali, the man who hit me. 

—from “My Hero?”




The story also appeared in this paperback of Simak stories with a beautiful Eddie Jones cover, which I bought in Scotland at Christmas break in 1977.
   “Small Deer”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Galaxy, Oct 1965

Alton James has a bent for all things mechanical and an interest in dinosaurs, so when his mathematically minded friend describes how a time machine should be built, Alton builds it and heads for 65 million B.C. to see what killed off the dinosaurs.

 We were lucky, that was all. We could have sent that camera back another thousand times, perhaps, and never caught a mastodon—probably never caught a thing. Although we would have known it had moved in time, for the landscape had been different, although not a great deal different. But from the landscape we could not have told if it had gone back a hundred or a thousand years. When we saw the mastadon, however, we knew we’d sent the camera back 10,000 years at least.
I wont bore you with how we worked out a lot of problems on our second model, or how Dennis managed to work out a time-meter that we could calibrate to send the machine a specific distance into time. Because all this is not important. What is important is what I found when I went into time.
Ive already told you Id read your book about Cretaceous dinosaurs and I liked the entire book, but that final chapter about the extinction of the dinosaurs is the one that really got me. Many a time Id lie awake at night thinking about all the theories you wrote about and trying to figure out in my own mind how it really was.
So when it was time to get into that machine and go, I knew where I would be headed.
 


   時をかける少女
English title: The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (translated from Japanese)
by Yasutaka Tsutsui (David Karashima, translator)
First publication: Chu̅aku Sannen, Nov 1965—Taka IchiMay 1966

After an earthquake and a fire keep her up late, junior high school girl Kazuko Yoshiyama rushes late to school with her friend Goro, and they both are run down by a speeding truck, but then she finds herself waking up again in a seemingly ordinary morning with no last-night earthquake, no last-night fire, and no runaway truck—at least not at this moment.

 As the first period of math class began, Mr. Komatsu—the fat math teacher—wrote down an equation on the board, and Kazuko began to frown. It was the very same problem theyd solved just the day before. But more than that, Mr. Komatsu had written the problem on the board at exactly the same time before, and Kazuko had been called to the front of the class, where shed struggled for some time over the solution. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
The Other Side of Time by Keith Laumer, Fantastic, Apr 1965 [alternate timelines ]

“Of Time and the Yan” by Roger Zelazny, F&SF, Jun 1965 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Down Styphon!” by H. Beam Piper (paratime), Analog, Nov 1965 [alternate timelines ]

 


16 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)