The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 1971

The cover art was by Marvel Comics artist Jim Steranko.   “In Entropy’s Jaws”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Infinity Two, 1971

John Skein, a communicator who telepathically facilitates meetings between minds, suffers a mental overload that causes him to experience stressful flashbacks and flashforwards, some of which lead him to seek a healing creature in the purple sands and blue-leaved trees by an orange sea under a lemon sun.

 Time is an ocean, and events come drifting to us as randomly as dead animals on the waves. We filter them. We screen out what doesnt make sense and admit them to our consciousness in what seems to be the right sequence. 

[Dec 2013]



   The Partridge Family
“Albuquerque” song by Tony Romeo
First time travel (trust me): 26 Feb 1971

I first noticed a Partridge Family time traveler in the song “Point Me in the Direction of Albuquerque” in which the young girl is obviously lost in time (although oddly, the key lyric line was omitted from the tv episode “Road Song”). If you listen closely, there are many other science fictional themes in the songs of Shirley Jones’s tv family, for example, the clones in One Night Stand (♫ I wish that I could be two people ♫) and, of course, the ubiquitous references to immortality (♫ Could it be forever? ♫).

 ♫ Showed me a ticket for a Greyhound bus
Her head was lost in time
She didn't know who or where she was
And anyone that helps me is a real good friend of mi&ndash–;i––ine ♫
 

[Feb 1971]

   Escape from the Planet of the Apes
by Paul Dehn (Don Taylor, director)
First release: 21 May 1971

Among the original Apes movies, only this one had true time travel; the others involved only relativistic time dilation, which (as even Dr. Milo knows) is technically not time travel. But in this one, Milo, Cornelius and Zira are blown back to the time of the original astronauts and are pesecuted in a 70s made-for-tv manner.

 Given the power to alter the future, have we the right to use it? 

[Jan 2012]

   The Dancer from Atlantis
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Aug 1971

On a romantic cruise with his wife and his troubled marriage, forty-year-old Duncan Reid is snatched from the deck by a vortex and deposited around 4000 B.C., where he meets three others who were similarly taken: the Russian Oleg, the Goth Uldin, and the beautiful bull-breeder Erissa who remembers the gods of her time, remembers Atlantis, and remembers Duncan fathering her child.

 She was lean, though full enough in hips and firm breasts to please any man, and long-limbed, swan-necked, head proudly held. That head was dolichocephalic but wide across brow and cheeks, tapering toward the chin, with, a classically straight nose and a full and mobile mouth which was a touch too big for conventional beauty. Arching brows and sooty lashes framed large bright eyes whose hazel shifted momentarily from leaf-green to storm-gray. Her black hair, thick and wavy, fell past her shoulders; a white streak ran back from the forehead. Except for suntan, a dusting of freckles, a few fine wrinkles and crows-feet, a beginning dryness, her skin was clear and fair. He guessed her age as about equal to his. 

[Jun 2015]

   “Dazed”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Galaxy, Sep/Oct 1971

In 1950, a 25-year-old man begins to think that his own generation—those who will soon be in charge—are taking the world in an Orwellian direction because of an imbalance that’s occuring, so he writes a personal ad seeking help in rebalancing the world, and he gets an instant answer that, among other things, takes him a few decades into the future.

 When he was in Lilliput there was a war between the Lilliputians and another nation of little people—I forget what they called themselves—and Gulliver intervened and ended the war. Anyway, he researched the two countries and found they had once been one. And he tried to find out what caused so many years of bitter enmity between them after they split. He found that there had been two factions in that original kingdom—the Big Endians and the Little Endians. And do you know where that started? Far back in their history, at breakfast one morning, one of the kings courtiers opened his boiled egg at the big end and another told him that was wrong, it should be opened at the small end! The point Dean Swift was making is that from such insignificant causes grow conflicts that can last centuries and kill thousands. Well, he was near the thing thats plagued me all my life, but he was content to say it happened that way. What blow-torches me is—why. Why are human beings capable of hating each other over such trifles? Why, when an ancient triviality is proved to be the cause of trouble, dont people just stop fighting? 

[Jul 2013]

   Dinosaur Beach
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Sep 1971

Timesweep agent Ravel finds himself the only survivor of an attack on the Dinosaur Beach substation until his wife shows up, although their marriage still lies in her future.

 The Timesweep program was a close parallel to the space sweep. The Old Era temporal experimenters had littered the timeways with everything from early one-way timecans to observation stations, dead bodies, abandoned instruments, weapons and equipment of all sorts, including an automatic mining setup established under the Antarctic icecap which caused headaches at the time of the Big Melt. 

[Jan 2014]

   Addio zio Tom
English title: Goodbye Uncle Tom (translated from Italian)
by Gualtiero Jacopetti, Franco Prosperi, et. al. (Jacopetti and Prosperi, directors)
First release: 30 Sep 1971

The brutality and conditions depicted in this controversial documentary on American slavery were too horrific for me to fully watch. The controversy comes not from poor writing of the dramatized scenes, but from claims that the producers were racists (which they denied) and the thought that the film would incite race wars in the inflammatory US of the 1970s. The final 15 minutes come forward to the present day, although I couldn’t follow the plot or the message related to a man reading The Confession of Nat Turner while other men reenact Turner’s acts (again too horrific for me to watch).

The movie is set in a framing story in which the filmmakers supposedly take their cameras and helicopters back to the 1850s.

 The historic personages we met at Mrs. Carstons dinner table, like all the others we will meet on our journey into the past lived and breathed nearly a century and a half ago, when they never could have imagined that one day soon their scattered bones would be harvested by black hands. Now revisited in their actual surroundings, they will do and say exactly what they actually did and said once upon a time. 

[Oct 2015]
 


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Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)