The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 1984

   Caballo de Troya Series
English title: The Trojan Horse Series (translated from spanish)
by Juan José Benítez
First book: 1984

L.S. Thomas kindly sent me a copy of her English translation of the first of nine books about time travelers who visit the life of Christ. Another translation was written by Margaret Sayers Peden.

 The computer display read 23 hours, 3 minutes and 22 seconds on Thursday March 30 of the year 30. We had “traveled back” a total of 17,019,289 hours. 

[Aug 2013]

   Norby Books
by Janet and Isaac Asimov
First time travel: 1984

In the second book of this children’s series (Norby’s Other Secret, 1984), the precocious robot reveals his time-travel powers to his pal Jeff; their mishaps in time continue in at least three later books (Norby and the Queen’s Necklace, Norby Finds a Villian, and Norby and Yobo’s Great Adventure).
[Jul 1985]

   “The Toynbee Convector”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Playboy, Jan 1984

You’ll enjoy this story (which was also an episode of Ray Bradbury Theater), but I’ll give away no more beyond the quote below. By the way, if you get the original publication, you’ll also acquire the last nude photo of Marilyn Monroe, although (to my knowledge) she never traveled through time.

 What can I do to save us from ourselves? How to save my friends, my city, my state, my country, the entire world from this obsession with doom? Well, it was in my library late one night that my hand, searching along shelves, touched at last on an old and beloved book by H.G. Wells. His time device called, ghostlike, down the years. I heard! I understood. I truly listened. Then I blueprinted. I built. I traveled . . . 

[Mar 2012]

   “Post Haste”
by Sharon Farber, James P. Killus, Susanna Jacobson and Dave Stout
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 1984

Science fiction writer Buzz Bailey has had several recent ideas for stories, including one about finding parking spaces through time travel, but the problem is that the top market, Prognosto Science Fiction, keeps vehemently rejecting the stories before they’re even written.

 “What the? . . .” He tipped up the envelope. Ashes spilled onto the floor. 

[Apr 2016]

   “Ghost Lecturer”
by Ian Watson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1984

A conceited man brings Lucretius to the present in order to explain to the classical scientist exactly where he was wrong, but it turns out that Lucretius’s classical atomism was brought along with him.

 What;s happening? Ill tell you what’s happening. Those “films” you see flying off surfaces and hitting your eyes—thats how our friend here thought visions worked. And now were seeing it happen, as though its true. 


   The Bunjee Venture
aka The Amazing Bunjee Venture
adapted by Malcolm Marmorstein
First aired: 24 Mar 1984

Karen and Andy’s dad builds a time machine (the last crucial part being their mom’s hair dryer), and the kids travel back to the prehistoric past to find new parents for orphaned Bunjee critter babies.

I like the ABC Weekend and Afternoon Specials. This is the second one that I saw with time travel. It’s based on a book by Stan McMurtry that I haven't yet seen, and there was a follow-on episode, “The Return of the Bunjee” in 1985.

 Ive created the ultimate scientific masterpiece. Ive done the impossible. Ive invented a time machine! 

[Aug 2013]

   “Twilight Time”
by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1984

Travis goes back to 1961 and the dance where he met his now-departed sweetheart, but he also has memories of aliens who quietly took over the world.

 A decade of peace and quiet and short hair was winding down; a time when people knew their place and stayed in it. For ten years nobody had wanted anything but a new car and a bigger TV set. Now all that was about to change. In a little over a year the Cuban missile crisis would send thousands of people into their back yards to dig bomb shelters, and “advisors” would start pouring into Southeast Asia. In another year the president would be dead. 

[Jun 1984]

   The Philadelphia Experiment
adapted by Michael Janover, William Gray, et. al. (Stewart Rafill, director)
First release: 3 Aug 1984

Seaman David Herdeg and his pal are thrown from 1943 to 1984 during a naval experiment gone awry, and in that future, David is the only one who can save a missing town (provided he can dodge enough bullets and perhaps win the heart of the lovely Allison Hayes).

 Navy owes me 40 years back pay. 

[Jan 2011]

   The Mackenzie Stories
by John Gribbin
First story: Analog, Sep 1984

Mackenzie, a researcher and problem solver who must continually justify his existence to his benefactor, is puzzled about why the things he sends back in time never reappear, but then in the first story (“Perpendicular Worlds,” Sep 1984 Analog) he starts thinking about Hawking black holes and Everett parallel worlds, and his work continues in a second story (“Random Variable,” Feb 1986 Analog) (although I prefer Gribbon’s science books).

 There must be as many different ways in which the world could have got into the state it is now as there are different ways in which it can develop into the future. 

[Jun 2013]

   The Terminator
by James Cameron and William Wisher, Jr. (Cameron, director)
First release: 26 Oct 1984

Artificially intelligent machines from 2029 send a killer cyborg back to 1984 to kill the mother of John Connor because, in 2029, John will lead the resistance against the machines’ rule.

 Come with me if you want to live. 

—Kyle to Sarah at the Tech-Noir Club

[Oct 1984]

   “Slan Libh”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Nov 1984

When Kevin O Malley’s home-built time machine becomes operable, he uses it to research his Irish ancestors during the potato blight of 1845.

 The past is changeable but self-correcting. Easy to change small things; harder to change big ones. 

[Jun 2013]

   “The Life of Boswell”
by Jerry Oltion
First publication: Analog, Dec 1984

Michael Wagoner doesn't really want to be an English major and write poetry for the rest of his life, but what choice does he have—until the first day of his final semester when he meets a centerfold.

 All innocence, she turned to the middle, opened the gatefold, held it out sideways, then vertically. I dropped the beer when she shouted, “Grandma!” 

[Jun 2013]

   Saturday Night Live
created by Lorne Michaels
First time travel: 1 Dec 1984

We all know that early in her career, Teri Garr hung out with a time-traveling Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock. But who knew that she’d be time traveling again in a 1985 SNL time travel skit? I tried hard to pick my favorite from the bunch that I know of, but that’s an impossible task given that each one is bizaare is a completely orthogonal direction from the others.

Please let me know if you know of other episodes!
  1. A Time Traveler Interrupts Book Beat (1 Dec 1984): Time traveler Ed Begley, Jr., bursts in on an SNL skit because of a pressing need to see a particular young lady. “I’ve been looking for a young lady, Julie Louis-Dreyfus. Have you seen her?”
  2. Time Machine Trivia Game (21 Dec 1985): Teri Garr and Randy Quaid play Trivial Pursuit with Nora Dunn and Jon Lovitz while the family teenager, Anthony Michael Hall, changes the answers with his time machine science project. “Ted Kennedy, Chappaquiddick, eight hundered secreetaries, really sorry.”
  3. Presidential Debate (8 Nov 1988): Tom Hanks hosts Jon Lovitz and Dana Carvey in the 1988 presidential election debate. “I’m glad you asked me that, Sam, because tonight I can reveal something that’s just been declassified. The key to SDI, to the whole concept, is a Time Machine.”
  4. The Tooncinator (16 Nov 1991): Linda Hamilton herself tries to escape the robot cat Tooncinator while Terminator Phil Hartman tries to save SNL. “Not you again! I crushed you, then I melted you! What do I have to do, Cuisinart you?”
  5. Dave Is Always Five Subjects Ago (11 Jan 1992): While dining with Beth Cahill and Mike Myers, Rob Morrow can never seem to think of a quick comeback or relevant remark until the moment has passed. “They probably show ’em The French Connection.”
  6. Deep Thoughts: Time Travel Etiquette (16 Jan 1993): “It’s probably best to avoid eye contact.
  7. The Falconer: Time Travel (20 May 2006): Before he was Frank Underwood, Kevin Spacey traveler through time to meet his earlier self and try to save Donald. The saving plan went awry, but we got to see many more Falconers (though only one Donald and only one Abraham Lincoln). “To the time machine!”
  8. George Washington Returns (12 Feb 2011): Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader may accept Russell Brand as our first president, but will they have the final word? “You will each have sixty seconds to make your case to him. At that point, President Washington will give his expert opinion: We will accept it.”
  9. Statler and Waldorf (19 Nov 2011): While Jason Segel sings with the Muppets, Statler and Waldorf comment from the peanut gallery. “I hope Florence brought a time machine so we can go back to before we heard that song!”
  10. Best Friends (10 Dec 2011): An odd assortment of best friends, including Abraham Lincoln and Marilyn Monroe, celebrate the holiday season. ♫Let’s turn it on and meet Abraham Lincoln.♫

 Bobby, are you altering human destiny after your father told you not to? 


   “Hindsight”
by Harry Turtledove (as by Eric G. Iverson)
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1984

When 1950’s science fiction writer Mark Gordian has a flurry of great stories (“Watergate,” “Houston, We've Got a Problem,” “Neutron Star,” and the ultimate time-travel yarn, “All You Zombies”), Pete Lundquist has nothing but admiration, until Gordian comes out with a story that Pete himself has been outlining.

 “Oh, my God! Tet Offensive!” McGregor stared from one of them to the other. “Youre not telling me that ones based on fact?” 

[Jun 2013]
 

Additional Adventures (without Time Travel)

I often see potential time-travel stories that, alas, have no time travel. I track them, so that I don’t process these same chronotypical stories over and over in a time loop of my very own.
1984

 These arent the droids youre looking for . . . move along. 


 1984
Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai by W.D. Richter and Neil Canton [oscillation overthruster ≠ flux capacitor]

“Mrs. Todd’s Shortcut” by Stephen King [4D spacial topology]

“Realtime” by Gladys Prebehalla and Daniel Keys Moran [despite title, no time travel]

Voltron by World Events Productions [no definite time travel]

“Writing Time” by Isaac Asimov [despite title, no time travel]


19 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)