The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 2001

   Power Rangers Time Force
by Judd Lynn and Jackie Marchland
First episode: 3 Feb 2001

In the ninth season of the power rangers, evil mutant Ransik flees from the 30th century back to our time. Rangers pursue. I don’t know whether other years had time travel.

 If I cant rule the present, then Ill just rule the paaaaaast! 

[Dec 2012]

The two stories were expanded into this 2009 novel.   The Titus Oates Stories
by Brenda W. Clough
First story: Analog, Apr 2001

Titus Oates, a member of Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole, is taken from the time stream and revived in a bewildering 21st century, whereupon he does what any self-respecting explorer would do—heads to the stars!

The two Oates stories (“May Be Some Time” in the April 2001 Analog and “Tiptoe on a Fence Post” in the Jul/Aug 2002 Analog) were combined and expanded for the 2009 novel, Revise the World.

 Not only are you a person rescued from a tragic death, but your removal is supremely unlikely to trigger any change in the time-stream, since your body was lost: presumed frozen solid, entombed in a glacier for eons . . . 

[Nov 2001]

   “What Weena Knew”
by James Van Pelt
First publication: Analog, Apr 2001

James Van Pelt kindly had coffee with me and signed a baseball for me at a Denver science fiction convention—oh, and he wrote (among other things) this fine story of Weena from the moment that H.G. Wells’s time traveller rescued her from the river.

I met the prolific and kind James Van Pelt at a convention in Denver, where we talked about one of his students who later came to Boulder to study computer science. I had misinterpreted a biography of Van Pelt in Analog as if it were an obituary, so I was happy to see the outstanding writer alive and willing to sign a baseball that I presented to him.

 Then a vice clamped her upper arm. A surge. A tremendous force, and she was clear of the stream. Air! There was air to breathe, but all she could do was cough. She was being carried. Her cheek rested on skin. Hough arms wrapped her close until they were on the bank. Gently, her rescuer put her down. Rock warmed her back; her hands lay flat in the heat, her head dropped onto the warmth. Against the sky stood a figure stragely shaped. Weenas vision swirled—she could barely focus—but before she passed out, she saw in wonder, he was a giant. 

[Nov 2001]

   Just Visiting
by Jean-Marie Poiré, Christian Clavier and John Hughes (Poiré, director)
First release: 6 Apr 2001

I just wasn’t in the mood for a comedy when I tried to watch this movie where witchcraft transports a 13th-century knight and his servant to the year 2000.

 You could tell from the petulant arch on his furrowed brow that he was not in route to a good deed. 

[Aug 2011]

   Farscape
created by Rockne S. O’Bannon
First time travel: 13 Apr 2001

I enjoyed the interplay of the characters in the first season: Earth astronaut John Crichton who’s sucked through a wormhole in the style of Star Trek Voyager to end up on a living spaceship (Moya) with the Pilot plus four fugitives: Peacekeeper soldier Aeryn, Warrior D’Argo, deposed emperor Rygel XVI, and the priestess Zhaan—all being persued by the obsessed Bialar Crais. That first season had visions of the future but, alas, no time travel. In later seasons my interest waned, even though there was real time travel in one episode, “Different Destinations” (13 Apr 2001).

 Chiana has already told me a few words. Yes. No. Bite me. Thats all I need to know. 

—D’Argo in “Kansas”

[May 2015]

   The Poultry Paradox
by Carlos Pedroza (Pedroza, director)
First released: 15 Apr 2001

So which did come first?

 Broadcasting live from the beginning of time, despite everything; well prove that the chicken came before the egg. 

[Jul 2013]

   T2 Novels
by S.M. Stirling
First book: May 2001

There are interminable Terminator spin-offs, and this series is the first. I enjoyed the first book, T2: Infiltrator, set after the second movie with Sarah and 16-year-old son on the run in Paraguay.
  1. T2: Infiltrator (2001)  
  2. T2: Rising Storm (2003)  
  3. T2: The Future War (2004)  

 Come with me if you want to live. 

—John Connor to Kyle Reese in T2: The Future War

[Jul 2010]

   Futurama
created by Matt Groening
First time travel: 6 May 2001

Philip J. Fry never caught my interest the way the Simpsons did, but after suviving a millennium in cryogenic suspension, Philip and his 31st century cohorts do have some wacky time travel, including “The Late Philip J. Fry” wherein the professor’s one-way time machine takes them further and further into futures with a strange resemblance to various sf movie futures.
  1. Time Keeps on Slippin’ (6 May 2001) Chronitons skip time forward
  2. Roswell That Ends Well (9 Dec 2001) back to Area 51 in 1947
  3. The Why of Fry (6 Apr 2003) back to time he was frozen
  4. The Late Philip J. Fry (29 Jul 2010) time machine that only goes forward
  5. Meanwhile (4 Sep 2013) ten second rewind button
  6. All the Presidents’ Heads (28 Jul 2011)    American revolution

 We are travelers from the past, my good one. Since your time, human evolution has diverged. There are we—advanced in intellect and morality—and the dumblocks—stupid, vicious brutes who live underground. 

—from “The Late Philip J. Fry”

[Jul 2013]

   “A Matter of Time”
by Robert Reginald
First publication: Katydid & Other Critters, Jun 2001

When Jake Smith’s neighbor—Stratton Bundford Audray, Ph.D.—invents a time machine, Jake volunteers to be the first human traveler in order to solve a vexing problem about his own ancestry.

 Ive been tracing my family tree, and ve reached this dead end, because Smith is such a common name, and Id really like to volunteer to make the first manned expedition into the past. 

[Sep 2015]

The story also appeared in this 2010 collection.   “Saving Jane Austen”
by Robert Reginald
First publication: Katydid & Other Critters, Jun 2001

Time travelers Jake Lawson, Patricia Wardon, and their small entourage travel to 1801 England to observe young Jane Austen, who to Jake seems incredibly unimpressive while Patty observes that she is full of sentimental claptrap. Things, however, are not always what they seem.

 This is the fourth timestep Ive made, and I can never quite get used to arriving downtime with nary a stitch in place. I know the engineers have explained the scientific reasons why this must be so, something about biostatic energy not being transferable to inert objects, but if thats the case, why dont we also lose our teeth, our nails, and hair at the same time? 

[Sep 2015]

   Time Squad
created by Dave Wasson
First episode: 8 Jun 2001

In a utopian future, the past starts to unravel and it’s up to Otto, a ten-year-old 21st century orphan, and the rest of the Time Squad to patch things back together.

 Thats the History Instability Alarm! Its time for another mission! 

[Jul 2013]

   “Grandpa?”
by Edward M. Lerner
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2001

Professor Thaddeus Fitch gives a practical demonstration of the grandfather paradox to his physics classes.

 Imagine that I had the technology with which to visit my grandfather in his youth. Once there, what is to stop me from killing him before hed had the opportunity to reproduce? But if I did succeed, who was it who had travelled backward . . . 

[Dec 2001]

   劇場版ポケットモンスター セレビィ 時を越えた遭遇(であい
English title: Pokémon 4Ever: Celebi—Voice of the Forest (translated from Japanese)
by Hideki Sonoda (Kunihiko Yuyama, director)
First release: 7 Jul 2001

A tiny Pokéemon Celebi and his boy are chased into the future by a Pokémon hunter.

 They say theres a sound you can hear when the spirit that protects the forest is time traveling. 

[Feb 2014]

   Burton’s Planet of the Apes
by Pierre Boulle, William Broyles Jr., Lawrence Konner, et. al. (Tim Burton, director)
First release: 27 Jul 2001

I found two redeeming features in this melodramatic complete remake: Helena Bonham Carter and a time-travel twist at the end that was beyond my understanding.

 In this temple as in the hearts of the apes for whom he saved the planet the memory of General Thade is enshrined forever  

[Dec 2011]

Publicity poster for Writers of the Future   “T.E.A. and Koumiss”
by Steven C. Raine
First publication: Writers of the Future Volume 17, Aug 2001

Time-travel agent Germaine returns to the time of Ghengis Khan along with telepath bimbo Elena, intent on stopping Vlad from installing a millenia-long Russian utopia.

 Vladimir zipped back in time to change the past. With his background, our psych reckons with 90 percent probability that his goal will be to make medieval Russia supreme through guiding the Great Prince here. 

[Feb 2002]

   “Time Out of Mind”
by Everett S. Jacobs
First publication: Writers of the Future Volume 17, Aug 2001

Thomas Randall, young and single, lives in a world that is besotted by bubbles that shift acres from one time to another.

 The rotting carcass of an apatosaurus blocked the intersection of Highway 9 and Needham Road. 

[Feb 2002]

   Samurai Jack
created by Genndy Tartakovsky
First episode: 10 Aug 2001

When the evil Aku returns to threaten the empire, a young prince trains for years to eventually fight and defeat him, but before Aku can be fully vanquished, he sends the prince into the future where he battles through threat after threat (with stories told in pictures more than words) in his quest to return to his own time.

 I thought once like you, but the sword is only a tool. What power has it compared to that of the hand that wields it? 

[Jul 2013]

   Invader Zim
created by Jhonen Vasquez
First time travel: 24 Aug 2001

Tim showed me the one Zim time-travel episode (“Big, Bad Rubber Piggy”) on Christmas Day in 2010. The would-be alien invader Zim plans to send a terminator robot back to kill is nemesis Dib, but the time-travel portal will accept only rubber piggies, which Zim manages to make do with.

 You could prevent Walton Chunky from ever inventing Breakfast Chunks by using temporal object replacement technology! 

—“Big, Bad Rubbery Piggy”

[Dec 2010]

Before publishing a sequel to The Time Machine, Bricker also had a War of the Worlds sequel in this 2010 anthology.   “Love and Glass”
by Michael Scott Bricker
First publication: Bones of the World, Sep 2001

Stranded at the end of the world, Wells’s time traveller has only one companion, a Morlock descendant whom the traveller dubs George, until others appear, including the predator called The Queen of Hearts.

 The Time Traveller asked him whether he was the last of his kind, George touched his shoulder, and within that look passed understanding. 

[Dec 2015]

   Happy Accidents
by Brad Anderson (Anderson, director)
First release: 12 Sep 2001

Ruby Weaver tells her therapist that her latest beau, Sam Deed, is sweet, kind and quirky—and the fantasy that he’s come back from the year 2470 because of that photo he saw of her (and possibly to make an important change) is nothing more than a game that they play.

 Break the causal chain. 

[Dec 2012]



   Star Trek: Enterprise
created by Rick Berman and Brannon Braga
First episode: 26 Sep 2001

You must watch the whole of Enterprise to grok the full arc of the Temporal Cold War with 13 episodes that were more temporal than others:
  1. Cold Front (28 Nov 2001) Crewman Daniels from 31st century
  2. Shockwave I/II (22 May / 18 Sep 2002) forward to 31st century
  3. Future Tense (19 Feb 2003) little time loops and cold war
  4. Twilight (5 Nov 2003) future T’Pol tries to correct past
  5. Carpenter Street (26 Nov 2003) Detroit in 2004
  6. Azati Prime (3 Mar 2004) more of Daniels and Cold War
  7. E² (5 May 2004) meet your own descendants
  8. Zero Hour (26 May 2004) World War II
  9. Storm Front I/II (8/15 Oct 2004) World War II
  10. In a Mirror, Darkly I/II (22/29 Apr 2005)    23rd-century Defiant

 Old T’Pol: Theres a human expression: Follow your heart.
Young T’Pol: What if my heart doesnt know what it wants?
Old T’Pol: It will, in time, it will.
 

[Sep 2001]

   “Other People”
by Neil Gaiman
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2001

The demon of this story carries out an exquisite torture of his victim. At the end, we do discover the victim’s fate, though I wondered what became of the demon. Time travel? I haven’t heard Gaiman talk of this story, but I like to think of it in that way because of the opening and closing quotes.

 “Time is fluid here,” he told the new arrival. 

[Jan 2014]

   “Oven, Witch and Wardrobe”
by Tom Sweeney
First publication: Analog, Oct 2001

Siobhan hopes to advance in the time-travelers' hierarchy by successfully transferring plague-doomed children from 1410 Europe to Colonial America.

 It had seemed such an easy thing to do. Beguile hungry children with food, ship their dirty young butts off to colonial America and return to the twenty-third century to become the first researcher ever to use time travel for humanitarian purposes. 

[Sep 2012]

   Halloweentown II: Kalabar’s Revenge
by Jon Cooksey, Ali Marie Matheson and Paul Burnbaum (Mary Lambert, director)
First release: 12 Oct 2001 (made-for-tv)

Teenage witch Marnie Piper has a mom who doesn’t want her to carry on in the witch tradition, a grandma (Debbie Reynolds) who wants to take her on as an apprentice, and Kal—a cute guy hanging around who turns out to be the son of the family nemesis. When Marnie gets trapped by Kal in the other-dimension Halloweentown, Marnie and her troll friend Luke use time travel to escape; later they use a black-holeish “timeline” to get back to the present and save the day.

 You know that looks just like a Stephen Hawking description of a non-stellar black hole. 

[Oct 2015]

   Buffy the Vampire Slayer
created by Joss Whedon
First time travel: 23 Oct 2001

Time travel was not a staple for the young bloodsucker nemesis, but Buffy did slay time on a few occassions.
  1. Life Serial (23 Oct 2001)    in a time loop fighting a mummy hand
  2. Get It Done (18 Feb 2003)    back to meet original slayer makers

 Via, concursus, tempus, spatium, audi me ut imperio. Screw it! Mighty forces, I suck at Latin, okay? But thats not the issue. Im the one in charge, and Im telling you open that portal, now! 

—Willow in “Get It Done”

[Oct 2001]

   Die Abrafaxe—Unter schwarzer Flagge
English title: The Pirates of Tortuga: Under the Black Flag (translated from German)
aka The Abrafaxe: Under the Black Flag
by Everett, Grützke, Platt, and Rietschel (Hahn and Power, directors)
First release: 25 Oct 2001

Abrax (English: Alex), Brabax (Max) and Califax—the young characters from the long-running German comic book, Mosaik—came to the animated screen in this time-travel adventure where they meet the 18th century pirates Anne Bonnie (good and beautiful) and Blackbeard (bad and bearded).

 The futures a cruel mistress. She never declares her hand until its too late. 

[Sep 2015]

The anthology had 12 original time travel stories, including “A Touch Through Time.” Let’s see whether I can manage 12 interesting images to illustrate the stories.   “A Touch Through Time”
by Kathleen M. Massie-Ferch
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

Dr. Connor Robins uses his time machine to grab extinct animals who are about to die anyway (since things break down if he tries to alter the past), and he also a young actress who died in a 1920s fire.

Kathleen M. Massie-Ferch, an avid geologist and writer, died of breast cancer shortly after this story was published.

 You could steal all the cells you wanted to use in cloning, or some sperm and ova. Anything, provided that the interaction changed nothing about their time-stream. We could even pull some of the bodies forward. 

[Apr 2012]

The story also appeared online for the
Free Fiction Monday
of 5 Aug 2013.
   “Blood Trail”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

Detective Wheldon, the top man in NYPD Homicide is approached by two FBI agents who offer to let him go back in time two weeks to observe the 4th killing by a serial killer.

This is the first story in Future Imperfect, a 2001 anthology of 12 original time-travel stories, co-edited by the prolific anthology Martin H. Greenberg (1941-2011) who was also a political science professor at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay.

 When it became clear that time travel was even a remote possibility, the government bought a lot of scientists. Those who didnt play got discredited. 

[Mar 2012]

The story also appeared in this 2005 collection.   “Convolution”
by James P. Hogan
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

Professor Alymer Arbuthnot Abercrombie is on the verge of completing eight years of work to build a time machine when all of his vital notes are stolen.

 How can he tell you what youll do, like some kind of robot executing a program? Youre a human being with free will, for heavens sake. What happens if you plumb decide youre not going to do it? 

[Apr 2012]

The story also appeared in this 2005 collection.   “Doing Time”
by Robin Wayne Bailey
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

Samuel Enderby, Director and Chief Researcher of the Enderby Institute for Temporal Studies (and the inventor of the time machine) accidently finds himself stranded in 10,000,000 AD where the only other occupants are criminals who have been launched uptime using his technology.

 A marvelous tool for research has been abused and twisted to a vicious purpose. 

[Mar 2012]

   “In the Company of Heroes”
by Diane Duane
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

A Swiss clockmaker offers billionaire Rob Willingden the chance to go back to his boyhood to stop the theft of his prized collection of Captain Thunder comics.

In 1987, Marvel’s own Roy Thomas was one of the founders of Hero Comics which sported a title called Captain Thunder and Blue Bolt, but the 1960s timing for the comic book of this story makes it more likely to be modeled after The Mighty Thor who premiered in Journey Into Mystery 83 (Aug 1962).

 This is a repair I think you must make. It is irresponsible to leave something broken when it can be fixed— 

[Mar 2012]

Tipler's Physics of Immortality   “Iterations”
by William H. Keith, Jr.
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

An accident near a black hole has seemingly doomed Kevyn Shalamarn along with her copilot and her AI, until they are pulled into a future that could be taken from Frank Tipler’s The Physics of Immortality.

 The goal of this device is nothing less than complete knowledge, knowledge of everything that ever has been, that ever will be, that ever could be. 

[Apr 2012]

The Anasazi Man in a Maze design   “Jeff’s Best Joke”
by Jane Lindskold
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

When a crazy old man calling himself Coyote shows up at an archaeological dig in New Mexico claiming that the Anasazi disappeared into time, Jeff knows that the only way to convince the world of Coyote’s truth is to play a colossal joke on his co-director Jimmy.

 Time even passes differently at the top of a high building than at its base. 

[Mar 2012]

   “Mint Condition”
by Nina Kiriki Hoffman
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

Sissy is an experienced agent for CollectorCorps, but she always gets stuck with a male chauvinist rookie for her partner in trips to retrieve highly collectable items from the past.

As you can tell from the comic book image, I’d say that the comic book Sissy was after in this trip was based on Giant-Size X-Men 1.

 Autographed copies of Minus Men 121? Practically nonexistent in 2059, at least until we got home with some. 

[Mar 2012]

The story also appeared in this 2003 collection.   “Palimpsest Day”
by Gary A. Braunbeck
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

In his forties, Danny’s parents are long gone as is the hope he had of marrying the girl he longed for in high school; instead, he runs a used bookstore in his childhood hometown, takes care of his Downs Syndrome sister, and has a surprising chance to change everything in the past.

 Live your life as if you were already living for the second time and as if you had acted the first time as wrongly as you are about to act now. 

—Danny’s mother (possibly quoting Victor E. Frankl’s Mans Search for Meaning).

[Apr 2012]

   “Theory of Relativity”
by Jody Lynn Nye
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

Dr. Rachel Fenstone takes her time machine from her universe to a parallel universe (both of which contain the Marx Brothers) where she meets an analog of herself so that together they can figure out where their histories diverged and visit that moment in their mutual pasts.

 In June’s reality her grandfather was an inventor, too, but his parents settled in New York, where the boys grew up in the tenements not far from where the Marx Brothers were born. 

[Apr 2012]

The story also appeared in Stephen Jones’s 2010 anthology, Visitants.   “Things I Didn’t Know My Father Knew”
by Peter Crowther
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001

After his wife leaves for the day, writer Bennett Differing’s house is engulfed in a thick white fog, out of which comes his father who died 27 years before.

The second publication in Visitants (2010) is more in-line with the story than a time-travel anthology.

 Maybe the dead did use mist as a means of getting around—so many movies had already figured that one out . . . and maybe they did travel in time. 

[Mar 2012]

   “What Time Is It?”
by Rita Lamb
First publication: The Young Oxford Book of Timewarp Stories, Nov 2001

A 15-year-old boy sits with his elderly grandmother who had trouble remembering what time she is in, and at least once, the trouble slips over to the boy, too.

 And drowsily I put my hand down to where I felt the warm, heavy head shifting restlessly on my kneww, and I stoked the silky crown, and I looked into the puzzled brown eyes of a young dog. 

[Jan 2014]

David Wyatt’s interior art for the story from Timewarp Stories   “Timestorm”
by Steve Bowkett
First publication: The Young Oxford Book of Timewarp Stories, Nov 2001

Danny and his partner in soldiering are at ground zero when a storm of refugees from a devastated future begins to arrive.

 Nobody really knew much about that devastation—The Catastrophe, as it had been called. It had happened—would happen, from Dannys perspective—almost a million years in the future, or so the Time Techs believed. 

[Jan 2014]

   Black Knight
by Darryl Quarles, Peter Gaulke and Gerry Swallow (Gil Junger, director)
First release: 21 Nov 2001

When janitor Jamal Walker falls into the moat at Medieval World, he wakes up and carries out a weak impersonation of a Connecticut Yankee.

 Your Majesty, starting at small forward from Englewood High, two-time all-county conference player of the year, the messenger from Normandie—Jamal “Skyyyyyy” Walker! 

[Jun 2012]

   The Bonaventure-Carmody Series
by Chris Roberson
First book: Dec 2001

After boarding-school student Roxanne Bonaventure stumbles across a bloody old woman who gives her a bracelet, she begins to find herself in different times and alternate universes with different Beatles’ songs and alternate Beatles.

This first novel, Any Time at All: The Lives and Time of Roxanne Bonaventure, was expanded into Here, There & Everywhere and followed by three more books.
  1. Set the Seas on Fire (Dec 2001)
  2. Any Time at All (Sep 2002)
  3. Here, There & Everywhere  (Apr 2005) expands Any Time at All
  4. Paragaea: A Planetary Romance (May 2006)
  5. Set the Seas on Fire  (Aug 2007) Expansion
  6. End of the Century (Feb 2009)

 Roxanne smiled awkwardly, and looked over Juliens shoulder at the open stall. It looked unremarkable now, drab green-painted metal walls and a white porcelain toilet. Hardly the thing youd expect from some sort of door in time. At least proper English children in books got to travel through wardrobes and garden holes, not through unhygenic high school bathrooms. 

[Aug 2012]

   Another Day
by Helen Frost and Don MacLeod (Jeffrey Reiner, director)
First release: 4 Dec 2001

After pregnant Kates boyfriend dies in a factory fire, she decides to forgo medical school and raise the baby along with her best friend David until four years later when a tramatic incident, some melodramtic music and godawful narration throw her back to before the fire.

 Thats impossible. Its one of a kind, and I made it with Meghan in crafts class last week. 

[Aug 2013]

   “Time Sharing”
by Leland Neville
First publication: Fantastic, Winter 2001

Detective Lindsey Fillmore arrives at Taylor Houston’s house to investigate a dead body and possibly connect it to Houston’s video-making time-traveling escapades.
[Dec 2001]

   Kate and Leopold
by Steven Rogers and James Mangold (Mangold, director)
First release: 25 Dec 2001

Leopold, a 19th century blueblood, awakens in 21st century New York where he meets and confounds adwoman Kate.

 Time, it has been proposed, is the fourth dimension. And yet, for mortal man, time has no dimension at all. We are like horses with blinders, seeing only what lies before us, forever guessing the future and fabricating the past. 

[Feb 2011]
 

Additional Adventures (without Time Travel)

I often see potential time-travel stories that, alas, have no time travel. I track them, so that I don’t process these same chronotypical stories over and over in a time loop of my very own.
2001

 These arent the droids youre looking for . . . move along. 


 2001
“The Gift of a Dream” by Dean Wesley Smith [fountain of youth]

The Monkey King (miniseries) by David Henry Hwang [civilization regresses]
                aka The Lost Empire

“A New Beginning” by Tony Ballantyne [alien memory]

The One by Glen Morgan and James Wong [alternate timelines]

The Poof Point by Stu Krieger (Neal Israel, director) [backward aging]

Sherlock Holmes and the Terror Out of Time by Ralph E. Vaughan [despite title, no time travel]

Vanilla Sky by Cameron Crowe [long sleep]


51 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)