The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

2005 


Das Cusanus-Spiel
aka The Cusanus Game
by Wolfgang Jaschke
First publication: 2005

In an alternate Europe where isolationism is enforced by towering walls and the world is crumbling around them, a secret project aims to save the present by harvesting the past.

 Only on the basis of his theoretical work and predictions did Folkert Jensma and Koos van Laere the following year at the Christian Huygens Institute in the Hague prove the existence of so-called time solitons, which Thilawuntha had predicted. These disturbances traverse the flow of time in both directions, that is, they bring about with their passage momentary damming and acceleration in the temporal dimension. They thereby deform the structure of space-time, but are eo ipso not directly detectable by an observer situated within this strugture—that is, within our universe. Their existence can, however, be indirectly demonstrated, because their passage is accompanied by gravitational waves of various strength. 

[Jun 2015]


“The Destruction of Sennacherib”
by Bryn Sparks
First publication: Robots and Time, 2005

Lady Ada Lovelace, who has traveled through time via a Wells-type machine in a steampunk world, tells her story to an enamored compatriot who is 50 years older than when they last shared a conversation.

 It seemed the original analytical engine, the mechanical computer designed and built by my friend and mentor, the great Charles Babbage in the 1830s, had a lethal configuration that could lock up an entire engine if it were ever presented with the right sequence of calculations. The article went on to describe how all the miniaturized analytical engines at the heart of the empires technology were just small versions of the original analytical engine. No one had ever changed the fundamental arrangement of cogs and gears and drive trains and clutches. They had just been made smaller and linked together in greater numbers, so here at the turn of the century, I could be driven in a cab by a man whose very thoughts were determined by the workings of beings of microscopic versions of Babbages original design, all operating in parallel. 

[Aug 2013]


The Time Hackers
by Gary Paulsen
First publication: 2005
Twelve-year-old Dorso Clayman lives in a future where viewing the past is commonplace, but he and his friend Frank are being unpredictably pulled into the past!

Janet found this for me at the library in 2010.

 They might see a vision of a dinosaur one time and on the second try get an image of a man who might be Julius Caesar getting ready for a bath, or Anne Boleyn getting her head chopped off. 

[Dec 2010]


“A Few Good Men”
by Richard A. Lovett
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2005
Time travelers from a future without many men come back to our time to import what they need most, but they accidentally snatch Tiffany Richardson as well.

 There were eight good prospects back there, and Id have had them all if this bitch hadnt shown up. 

[Dec 2005]


Slipstream
by Louis Morneau and Philip Badger (David van Eyssen, director)
First release: 4 Feb 2005

Sean Astin plans to use his 10-minute time machine to repeatedly withdraw the same money from a bank teller that he’s chatting up, but a violent gang of other bank robbers throws a wrench into his plan.

 Did you ever wish you could keep doing the same thing over and over again? 

[Apr 2012]


“Letters of Transit”
by Brian Plante
First publication: Analog, Apr 2005
A scientist on the first near-lightspeed ship to Centauri A exchanges letters with his underaged girlfriend back on Earth through a wormhole for which time passes at the same rate on both ends. When the ship returns to Earth with its end of the wormhole, the hole will act as a time machine for messages, but the clichéd paradox police won’t let scientist send girlfriend any information about the future.

 You wouldnt want to cause any of those nasty paradoxes, would you? 

[Jan 2006]


“Message in a Bottle”
by Nalo Hopkinson
First publication: Futureways, 1 Apr 2005
An artist named Greg, who never wanted to have children, becomes close to Kamla, an adopted daughter of a friend; the situation works out fine, even when Greg does have an unexpected child with his girlfriend, and even when Kamla turns out to be one of the thousands of children with extremely slow-growing bodies and minds from the future.

 I'm from the Future, Says Bobble-Headed Boy. 

[Apr 2014]


“The Apotheosis of Martin Padway”
by S.M. Stirling
First publication: The Enchanter Completed: A Tribute for L. Sprague de Camp


Some 50 years after Martin Padway was thrown back to Byzantine times, a group of holy men and scientists travel back to the supposed date when the Great Man ascended to godhood.

 “Its definitely a past with Martinus of Padua in it. There are no other lines within several hundred chronospace-years that show a scientific-industrial revolution this early. Quantum factors make it difficult”—fucking meaningless—“to say if its precisely the line that led to us.” 

[Feb 2014]


“Working on Borrowed Time”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Jun 2005
Tom and his implanted AI Jeannie (from “Small Moments in Time”) are back again, this time trying to stop future Nazis from destroying Edwardian London.

 What? The British Empire started coming apart in the 1920s? 

[Jul 2005]


“The Starry Night”
by Barry Malzberg and Jack Dann
First publication: Sci Fiction, 22 Jun 2005


A visage of the universe exploding bounces back and forth between a space-faring priest, an epileptic six-year-old in our day, and Vincent Van Gogh.

 For the first time she is a little scared. She wishes that she were in her room, not in this space car with the stars glowing and exploding like the stars in Mr. Goghs painting. 

[Dec 2013]


Bewitched
by Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron (Nora Ephron, director)
First release: 24 Jun 2005

Not only does Isabel the witch want to live just like any normal woman, she also gets talked into playing the role of witch Samantha who wants to live just like any normal woman in a remake of Bewitched—and like the original Samantha, she has some trouble constraining her powers. Yes, she’s also an occasional failure at constraining her power to rewind the hands of time.

 No breakfast after eleven. 

[Jul 2007]


“Scream Quietly”
by Sheila Crosby
First publication: Farthing, Jul 2005

In 1849 England, Sophie’s abusive husband abuses her and beatys their one-year-old son, so at the first opportunity, she and her son flees to a friend’s house where they are visited by apparent faeries.

 They said they were not faeries, but men, “even as yourselne,” from the far distant future, and they were journeying in time! They were most astonished to hear this was the year of our Lord 1849, for they had believed themselves in 1343 and were in great fear of being burned as witches. 

[Jul 2015]


“The Time Traveler’s Wife”
by Scott William Carter
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2005
No, we’re not talking about that wife; we’re talking about Scott William Carter’s version—Yolanda Green, an even-keeled, mostly content wife of a university professor time traveler—and the story of what she does when he goes off into the future, failing to return for dinner.

 “Weve done it,” he said. “Three times with a mouse and five times with a monkey. The university has approved my request for a manned test run. Were going into the future! 

[Sep 2012]


Time Warp Trio
adapted by Kathy Waugh, et. al.
First episode: 9 Jul 2005


Ten-year-old Joe and his two mates Fred and Sam travel back and forth in time in these 22-minute Discovery Kids cartoons based on Jon Scieszka’s story series.

 Ever wonder how three kids from Brooklyn got their hands on a time-traveling book? 

[Mar 2013]

I have no image for the story, but here’s the first book in Colorado author Tobler’s series, The Rings of Anubis.
“Gauging Moonlight”
by E. Catherine Tobler
First publication: Sci Fiction, 20 Jul 2005

The alien narrator loves Alice Oxbridge, although the word love does not capture the feeling any more accurately than space travel captures climbing into a vehicle capable of carrying you off-planet. And our narrator has the power to erase the the moments of tragedy in Alice’s life, he cannot do so without breaking his one unbreakable tenet and becoming the prime example of sentient idiocy.

 Alice’s was not the first birth I witnessed, nor even the most unusual. The first time I saw Alice’s birth, I bypassed the event, skimming ahead to the advent of the automobile. Gears fascinated me more. But on reflection, something drew me back to Alice in the garden, newborn on the rain-wet grass. The world seemed to move beneath her. 

[Oct 2012]


“Fleet of Ages”
by Jared Axelrod
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 5 Aug 2005

Axelrod is one of the founders of 365 Tomorrows, which presents a piece of flash fiction every day of the year, and this was their first time-travel story, a story in which ships bring items from the future with unpredictable consequences.

 I used to think that, more than any man, I understood the consequences of what those ships were supposed to bring back. 

[May 2015]

Kat Beyer’s
illustration for her story

“The Strange Desserts of
Professor Natalie Doom”

by Kat Beyer
First publication: Strange Horizons, 22 Aug 2005

For Natalie, it isn’t easy growing up as the only human creation of a mad scientist (including a time machine, of course) and his gorgeous, shapely wife— especially when you have the name of Natalie Doom and a leaning toward feminism).

 Apparently I inherited Mamas looks and Papas brains. Again and again in my life Ive gotten the best of a bad bargain. 

[Oct 2012]


“Paradox & Greenblatt, Attorneys at Law”
by Kevin J. Anderson
First publication: Analog, Sep 2005
Marty Paramus and his partner specialize in legal nuances arising from the new time-travel technology.

 So you figured that if you kept Franklins biological mother and father from meeting, he would never have been born, your parents marriage would have remained happy, and your life would have remained wonderful. 

[Aug 2005]

The story also appeared in this 2007 collection.
“Triceratops Summer”
by Michael Swanwick
First publication: Amazon Shorts, Sep 2005
An incident at the Institute for Advanced Physics brings a herd of Triceratops to present-day Vermont, which is certainly a worry, but according to Everett McCoughlan of the Institute, that will be the least of our worries by the end of the summer.

 Everything ends eventually. But after all is said and done, its waht we do in the meantime that matters, isnt it? 

[Mar 2014]


Hyams’ Sound of Thunder
adapted by Donnelly, Oppenheimer, Poirier (Peter Hyams, director)
First release: 2 Sep 2005


The time safari is not improved by 90 minutes of melodramatic nonsense.

 A butterfly caused all this? 

[Jul 2011]


“Who Forever Belongs To”
by Jared Axelrod
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 4 Oct 2005

In his second time-travel story, 365 Tomorrow founder Jared Axelrod has a rummage sale aficionado stumble across a time machine and philosophically discuss why the owner would let it go for five dollars.

 So when I unearthed the device from under a seriously disturbing collection of polyester sweaters, I knew it was something to treasure. I just didnt know what. 

[Jun 2015]


The Diving Universe Series
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2005
I haven’t followed all of the stories in Rusch’s Diving Universe, so I can’t tell you which of the stories and novels have a significant time-traveling aspect caused by the space-folding anacopa. But in “Becoming One with the Ghosts” (Asimovs, Oct/Nov 2010), the starship Ivoire gets folded 5000 years into the future. Later, while trying to shut down an anacapa drive gone bad in “Encounter on Starbase Kappa” (Asimovs, Oct/Nov 2013), Captain Jonathan “Coop” just might have a chance to return the ship and the crew to their own time.

 A. Diving into the Wreck (Dec 2005)Asimovs
B. Room of Lost Souls (Apr/May 2008)Asimovs
The Spires of Denon (Apr/May 2009)Asimovs
Diving into the Wreck (Nov 2009)includes parts of A and B
Becoming One with the Ghosts (Oct/Nov 2010)Asimovs
Becalmed (Apr/May 2011)Asimovs
City of Ruins (May 2011)
Stealth (Oct/Nov 2011)Asimovs
The Spires of Denon (Apr/May 2009)Asimovs
Boneyards (Jan 2012)
Skirmishes (Apr 2013)
Strangers at the Room of Lost Souls (May 2013)Asimovs
The Application of Hope (Aug 2013)Asimovs
Encounter on Starbase Kappa (Oct/Nov 2013)Asimovs

 Later, he learned that the anacapa malfunctioned, buringing him and his crew five thousand years into their future. 

[Feb 2015]


Chasing Christmas
by Todd Berger (Ron Oliver, director)
First aired: 4 Dec 2005 (mad-for-tv)

Jack Cameron, a Christmas grump, is taken back to 1965 by the ghost of Christmas Past who then decides to stay there, putting Jack and the cosmos at risk. It’s then up to Christmas Present to save the day, although in the end it’s dues ex machina rather than Present who fixes things.

 Past: Charles Dickens was a former target of ours who chose to write a book about his experiences even though we explicitly told him not to.
Jack: But it was a great book—
Past: It was crap, like everything he did! Did you ever read A Tale of Two Cities? ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst . . .’ Make up your mind, Mr. Dickens! 

[Jul 2015]
 

Additional Adventures (without Time Travel)

2005I often see potential time-travel stories that, alas, have no time travel. I track them, so I don’t process the same stories over and over in a time loop of my very own.

 These arent the droids youre looking for . . . move along. 

 2005
“Terminós” by Dean Francis Alfar [time issues, but no time travel]


24 items are in the time-travel list for this year.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)