The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 2008

   Campfire’s The Time Machine
adapted by Lewis Helfand and Rajesh Nagalukonda
First publication: 2008

Campfire Graphic Novels, based in New Delhi, is producing an adventurous series of long graphic adaptations of classic novels with vivid colors and striking artwork. Nagalukonda’s work on “The Time Machine” jumps out at you with an exagerated perspective and an original interpretation of the Eloi and the Morlocks.

 We did not know the man standing before us, but he spoke with much excitement and passion. Over time, we came to know him as the Time Traveler. 

[Jan 2012]

   Ctrl
by Robert Kirbyson and Bob Massey (Kirbyson, director)
First released: Jan 2008 (internet serial)

Nerd’s revenge with a keyboard, including ctrl-z which takes him back in time. The original 6-minute film took honors at the 2008 Sundance Festival, and then NBC picked it up for ten short webisodes.

 Just hit control-z. 

[Jan 2011]

   Chilly Beach: The World Is Hot Enough
by Daniel Hawes and Doug Sinclair (Edin Ibric, director)
First aired: 2 Jan 2008

When Dale’s attempt to warm up Chilly Beach lead to an environmental disaster, he and his pal Frank go back in time to set things right, hopefully without destroying all the hilarious stereotypes of Canadians and Americans. Bonus points if you can guess what kind of vehicle the time machine is. Hint: Not a Delorean.

 Even now, while millions of Amercans are tannin in the warm sunshine of Calfornia and Texas, millions more in the snows of Minnesota and Alaska must pay for artificial tannin machines and synthetic foul-smellin creme to achieve a similar but not entirely convincing effect. I feel your pain. 

[Jun 2016]

   The Pirates Who Don’t Do Anything:
A Veggie Tales Movie

by Phil Vischer (Mike Nawrocki, director)
First release: 11 Jan 2008

This movie loses a full star for the line “Why would a blind guy come to the dinner theater anyway?” The three main vegetables in the movie are cabin boys (i.e., servers)—Ellit, Sedgewick and George—at the aforementioned dinner theater, when a magic ball comes to take them back in time to rescue another vegetable, Eloise, from the pirate Robert the Terrible.

 Now were headed someplace. Weve got a metal ball. 

[Nov 2015]

   The Sarah Connor Chronicles
created by Josh Friedman
First episode: 13 Jan 2008

After the events of the second movie, Sarah and teenaged John are trying to lay low when Cameron, a beautiful young terminator, arrives from 2027 and tries to take them away from their problems with a jump to 2007; other terminators follow and violence ensues.

 Come with me if you wanna live. 

—Cameron Philips to John while fleeing Cromartie

[Jan 2008]

   Hamlet 2
by Pam Brady and Andrew Fleming (Fleming, director)
First release: 21 Jan 2008

Dana Marschz, a high school drama teacher whose theater program is on the cutting block, writes a sequel to Hamlet in which a time-traveling Hamlet forgives his father. Oh, time-traveling Jesus forgives his father, too.

Advice to time-travelers who may have come back for an authentic dvd experience with this comedy: For an exquisite and moving high school teacher movie, try Mr. Hollands Opus instead; for a wonderful and funny Elisabeth Shue movie, go for Adventures in Babysitting, with a bonus of the Mighty Thor; nevertheless, Hamlet 2 has some amusing moments of its own.

 Brie: Hamlet 2? Doesnt everybody die at the end of the first one?
Dana: I have a device. 

[Oct 2015]

   Minutemen
by John Killoran, David Diamond and David Weissman (Lev Spiro, director)
First aired: 25 Jan 2008 (direct-to-tv)

When 14-year-old Charlie invents a time machine, he gets together with his nerdy friend and the school biker to fix the social embarrassments inflicited upon fellow outcasts.

 Stop! [Flashes badge] Bureau of Weights and Measurements! 

[Mar 2012]

   “Inside the Box”
by Edward M. Lerner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 2008

After foiling a murder attempt by his time-traveling grandson, Professor Thaddeus Fitch tries to explain Schrödinger’s cat to his class of undergraduates.

 Some assert that the realm of quantum mechanics is so removed from the realm of our senses were unequipped to judge. 

[Jan 2008]

   “Knot Your Grandfather’s Knot”
by Howard V. Hendrix
First publication: Analog, Mar 2008

While sorting through the attic, elderly Mike Sakler finds a note from himself detailing how he must go back in time to save his grandfather from a mugging near the 1939 New York World’s Fair.

 Indeed the notes from that page on were most curious. “Planck energy for opening gap in spacetime fabric = 1019 billion electron volts,” read one, but then that was crossed out with a large X as the writer of the notes took a different tack. 

[Mar 2008]

   Phineas and Ferb
created by Dan Povenmire and Jeff “Swampy” Marsh
First time travel: 1 Mar 2008

Stepbrothers Phineas Flynn and Ferb Fletcher foil their sister Candace and undertake grand projects during their summer vacation, including some travel through time.
  1. It’s about Time (1 Mar 2008) to prehistoric times
  2. Quantum Boogaloo (21 Sep 2009)    Candance travels to future to bust brothers

 Mom, its me, Candace from the past. I came here in a time machine that Phineas and Ferb borrowed from a museum. Youve gotta bust them! 

[Aug 2013]

   Tripping the Rift: The Movie
by Amato, Goin, Laney, Minnis and Sweeney (Bernie Denk, director)
First release: 25 Mar 2008 (straight-to-video)

A mash-up of third season cartoon episodes (hence, all the writer credits) including the Terminator parody.

 So, its agreed: You and Babette travel back, decline the invitation to Chodes party, and Bernice will shut down the Arnie-1000. 

[Jul 2015]

   “The Beethoven Affair”
by Donald Moffitt
First publication: Analog, Apr 2008

In a world where music companies use time travel to plumb the past for new new pop hits, junior account executive Lester Krieg (no relation to my favorite Seattle Seahawk quarterback) comes up with the idea of getting Beethoven to write a tenth symphony—regardless of the cost.

 Everybody and his brother Jake knows that Beethoven wrote nine symphonies and stopped there. And even the dimmest of music lovers has wish fulfillment fantasies about what a tenth would have sounded like. 

[May 2008]

   “Lost Continent”
by Greg Egan
First publication: The Starry Rift: Tales of Tomorrow, Apr 2008

The north of Khurosan, not part of our world, lies the site of a bloody battle between the Warriors and the Scholars, both of whom have come through time to take Islamic boys and turn them into soldiers in their war, but one boy’ uncle gives him to a man who promises to take him to a safe place or possibly a safe time.

 I havent just been to Mecca. Ive been there in the time of the Prophet, peace be upon him. 

[Apr 2014]

Wismer’s fiction also appeared in this anthology.   “Vis Insita”
by Asher Wismer
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 17 May 2008

Professor Rudnicki sits in a bar, bemoaning the particular mode of failure of his latest time travel.

 Time is relative to our senses, space doubly so. What we perceive to be real is in fact the simple accumulation of expectation; we expect the glass to hold the whiskey, and we expect the whiskey to get us drunk, but only AFTER we drink it. 

[Jun 2015]

   “Back”
by Susan Forest
First publication: Analog, Jun 2008

Alan and Victor are carrying out a careful sequence of time-travel experiments with slips of paper, flatworms, stray cats, a potted palm and chimps, with the only problem being getting the time traveler back from the past.

 It was while Alan and Victor were touring the warehouse with the real estate agent tht a slip of paper bearing the words, “It worked,&rdqup; materialized on a desk in the office. 

[May 2008]

   “Finalizing History”
by Richard K. Lyon
First publication: Analog, Jun 2008

In early 1960, Perry Mason author Earl (not Erle) Stanley Gardner and his wife host John W. Campbell, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Edward Teller, Ronald Reagan, Douglas MacArthur and Jackie Kennedy to discuss a shared dream in which a time-traveling alien requires them to pick one person to eliminate from history as a prerequisite to a final revision of mankind’s history.

 If one of these people dies young, that will pay your debt. 

[May 2008]

   9th Wonders!
by Isaac Mendez
First publication in our world: 10 Jun 2008

You, too, can read some of these fictional comics from Heroes in the two volumes published in pleasant hardback books (transcribed by mortal artist Tim Sale).

 I did it! 

[Dec 2008]

   Artemis Fowl and the Time Paradox
by Eoin Colfer
First publication: 5 Jul 2008

In book six of the series, Artemis Fowl’s mother contracts a terminal disease for which the only possible cure lies in a species of lemur that Artemis made extinct eight years ago. The series is popular, but for me, the condescending tone of the series is its downfall.

 Oh, bless my bum-flap. Youre time travelers. 

[Dec 2014]

   Termination Point
by Peter Sullivan (Jason Bourque, director)
First release: 20 Jul 2008 (made-for-tv)

A scientist at a top-secret weapons facility creates a weapon that he then regrets. So he steals it and gets on a plane to Mexico with the head security agent’s family, hoping that having the family along will restrict the agent’s options. But the response is out of the agent’s hands when the president orders the plane shot down. Fortunatly, the scientist activates the weapon just before the missles strike the plane—well, partly fortunate: One copy of the plane and most of the passengers are blown into yesterday, while the scientist and the agent’s family survive in a null space that will first eat all of California and then the rest of the universe.

So, why were the dead passengers and one copy of the plane blown into yesterday? I never did figure that out; it had no bearing on the movie, except perhaps the filmmakers were Donnie Darko wannabes, and it provided a cheap wrap-up at the end.

 Hunky Farm Boy at the Beginning of the Movie: Whats the date today?
Curvaceous Farm Girl: September second. Why?
H.F.B.: This [crashed] plane boarded tomorrow! 

[Jul 2015]

   100 Million BC
by Paul Bales (Griff Furst, director)
First release: 29 Jul 2008 (direct-to-dvd)

After discovering a 64-million-year-old message written on a cave wall, Dr. Frank Reno, a scientist on the original Philadelphia Experiment, leads a group of modern-day Navy SEALs back to the Cretaceous to rescue those who were lost back in that 1949 experiment leading to machine-guns-vs-dinosaurs, a t-rex in Los Angeles, and potential paradoxes for the original travelers.

 FRANK IT WASNT YOUR FAULT 

[Dec 2012]

   Stargate: Continuum
by Brad Wright (Martin Wood, director)
First release: 20 Jul 2008

The Stargate crew (including Captain O’Neill, of course) have tracked down the last of the clones of the infamous Goa’uld System Lords and are ready to kill him off to make the many universes safe, but in his last words, he reveals the the original Lord still lives. Indeed, he does! And hes traveled back to 1939 to sink the ship that was bringing the artifact that created the Stargate program in the first place. Even though his plan doesn’t fully succeed, various crew in the present start disappearing while others end up back in 1939 where they are rescued by a Stargateless Captain O’Neill from the future.

Thats just for starters. Yet to come are changes to the past and subsequent changes to change those changes back, all with no sensible model of time travel.

 Samantha: Guys, I hate to interrupt, but the temperatures falling. We just passed minus forty.
Daniel: Celcius or Fahrenheit? 

[Sep 2015]

   Eureka
created by Andrew Cosby and Jaime Paglia
First time travel: 19 Aug 2008

Sheriff Jack Carter is not the brainiest person in the top-secret government enclave of Eureka (though his daughter Zoe might be), but even so, he gets his share of solutions to the zany science project problems that arise, including bouts with a time-loop wedding (“I Do Over” on 18 Aug 2008), a trip to 1947 (“Founder's Day”), a series-ending anomoly for Jack and Zoe (“Just Another Day” on 16 Jul 2012), and other time anomolies.

 Zoe: Dad, did you just see . . .?
Carter: Yeah, Ill deal with that tomorrow. 

—from the series finale

[Jul 2006]

   Lost in Austen
by Guy Andrews
First episode: 3 Sep 2008

Amanda Price, a young 21st-century Englishwoman and devotee of Jane Austen, swaps places with the heroine of Pride and Prejudice.

Unfortunately, the U.S. DVD movie mash-up omitted the bit where Amanda Price serenades Mr. Darcy, Mr. Binley, and Miss Bingley with Petula Clark’s “Downtown.” Damn those cheapskates who won’t pay for music rights! So, head straight for the full miniseries on Hulu!

 ♫Just listen to the misic of the traffic in the city.
La la la la, la la la and the neon lights are pretty.
How can you lose?♫
 

[Sep 2009]

   The Tomorrow Code
by Brian Falkner
First publication: Oct 2008

Australian teenager Tane Williams and his best friend (and genius) Rebecca Richards use university lab equipment to detect messages from the future which include a lottery number and a possible route to change Rebecca’s tragic past.

 “Try to think logically,” Rebecca said firmly but not unkindly. “How could you transport a live human being through a pinhole of any kind?” 

[Jan 2015]



In the U.S. pilot,
Colm Meaney was cast as Gene Hunt.
   Life on Mars (US)
adapted by Josh Appelbaum, Andre Nemec and Scott Rosenberg
First episode: 9 Oct 2008

I watched this show when it first came out, but it never engaged me, and somehow the casting seemed off. Not until seven years later did I watch the original U.K. version: Surprise! I was drawn in, partly because the characters appealed to me more, and partly because of a softer sell—still melodramatic, but not often over the top.

 It goes like this, Spaceman. We live on a rock, there aint no rhyme, there aint no reason. We live on a rock, just one of many. Hurling around in some big cosmic jumbalaya. Now you wanna get questiony, thats your prerogative. My ma took me to a loud church every Sunday. She squeezed her eyes shut, she pressed her rosary beads to her lips and she prayed for good things for those she loved. But, cancer took two of her sisters. Her husband couldnt make a move without a belly full of gin, her youngest son turned to a life of crime, and her oldest, me, is a nasty son of a bitch who cant get out of third gear without a snarl. So, who was she talking to every Sunday and why wasnt he answering? I will tell you why, because we live on a rock, just one of many. There aint no answers! Theres just this! And all you can really hope to do is to find a couple of people who make the seventy or eighty odd years we get to live on this sweet swinging sphere remotely tolerable.
I gotta take a leak.
 

[Oct 2008]

Mark Evan’s
interior illustration
   “Greenwich Nasty Time”
aka “Wizards of Science”
by Carl Frederick
First publication: Analog, Nov 2008

An experiment causes Great Britain to swap with a century-old version of itself, but fortunately, physics student Paul and his girlfriend Vicki were with their bicycles on the nearby Isle of Wight, so they make the crossing back to the main island and pedal to the rescue.

 The experiment could result in an alternate Great Britain being swapped with ours—one displaced backward in time from the instant of the experiment. 

[Dec 2008]







   Fringe
created by J.J. Abrams, Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci
First time travel: 2 Dec 2008

When smart and beautiful FBI Agent Olivia Dunham is recruited by Homeland Security to investigate strange happenings on the fringe of science, she’s given free rein to choose any colleagues she wishes, which leads her to the slightly mad (but kindly) scientist Walter Bishop and his jaded son Peter.

I didn’t get around to watching this until it appeared on Amazon Prime after the series finale. It’s a little too violent for my taste, but the three main characters have become favorites of mine just as much as Myca, Pete and Artie on that other show; and as I watched into the first half of Season 3, it became more and more addictive. By the time it reached the middle of Season 4, it became my favorite long love story ever.

The first glimpse of time travel was in Episode 10, when Walter tells of the time travel machine that he built to save Peter as a boy, although that episode didn’t see any actual traveling.
  1. Safe (2 Dec 2008) Walter tells of machine
  2. Ability (10 Feb 2009) Jones uses machine to escape jail
  3. August (19 Nov 2009) we learn the Observers time travel
  4. The Bishop Revival (28 Jan 2010)   possible Nazi time traveler
  5. Peter (1 Apr 2010) Observers time travel in alt univ
  6. White Tulip (15 Apr 2010) Dr. Alistair Peck loops thru time
  7. The Firefly (21 Jan 2011) Doc Brown’ son thru time
  8. The Day We Died (6 May 2011) Peter to future / machine to past
  9. Subject 9 (14 Oct 2011) short jumps back for Olivia
  10. Novation (4 Nov 2011) another short Olivia time loop
  11. And Those . . . Behind (11 Nov 2011)   events from four years in past
  12. An Origin Story (2 Nov 2012) a shipping corridor through time
  13. The Boy Must Live (11 Jan 2013) Windmark visits 2609
  14. Liberty (18 Jan 2013) still in 2609

 After all, I was the scientist; and my only son was dying and I couldnt do anything about it . . . I became consumed with saving you, conquering the disease. In my research, I discovered a doctor, Alfred Gross—Swiss, brillant physician, hes the only man that had ever successfully cured a case of heppia. But there was a problem: he had died in 1936. And so, I designed a device intended to reach back into time, to cross the time-space continuum, and retrieve Alfred Gross. 

[Mar 2013]

   Extreme Movie
by Adam Jay Epstein, et. al. (Epstein, director)
First release: 5 Dec 2008

The saddest part is how my opinions of Frankie Muniz (Chuck) and Beverley Mitchell (Sue) dropped just because they accepted parts in this series of silly teen sex vignettes centering around a high school sex class (no, not really a sex-ed class). There are better time travel movies for both of these favorite child actors! As for time travel in this movie, one teen’s sexual obsession is with Abraham Lincoln, so of course he builds a time machine and heads to the 19th century.

 Well . . . I got to get ready for the theater. 

[Oct 2015]

All good time machines must have crytals, including Napoleon Dynamite’s machine (shown above) and the machine in this story.   “Sufficiently Advanced”
by Sam Clough
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 14 Dec 2008

A man’s time machine takes him to the far future where he’s given the choice of which of four collectors to ally with.

 My instruments detected his arrival—hes mine by right. 

[May 2015]

   365 Tomorrow’s 2008 Time-Travel Stories

Note: § indicates a separate list entry for the story.

  1. Chronolicide, She Wrote (8 Jan) by J.S. Kachelries
    Angela Lansburyfield time-travel murder
  2. The Incomprehensible Being (20 Jul) by Cal Glover-Wessel
    Free movement thru time only
  3. The Yellow Room (2 Feb) by Seth Koproski
    time-travel philosophy
  4. Vis Insita (17 May)§ by Asher Wismer
    another time travel gone awry
  5. Unforeseen Consequences (16 Aug) by Luke Chmelik
    AIs and time machines don’t mix
  6. Time and Space (4 Sep) by Rayne Adams
    thief to ancient Egypt
  7. A Study in Logic (29 Sep) by Patricia Stewart
    Homes and Wattson
  8. The Old Man and the Sea Redux (30 Sep)  by Andy Bolt
    crowdsourcing the classics
  9. The Collector (7 Dec) by Tom Manzenec
    sliding sideways and forward in time
  10. Sufficiently Advanced (14 Dec)§ by Sam Clough
    four future collectors
  11. The Time Traveller (18 Dec) by Gavin Raine
    miscalculation going forward

 The old man fought off the dinosaurs, mused on the nature of human existence, fell in love with a woman who turned out to be a zombie, then a robot, and then his sister, had crab cakes and fine wine on the Parisian seashore, traveled back in time to kill Hitler . . . 

—“The Old Man and the Sea Redux”

[May 2015]
 

Additional Adventures (without Time Travel)

I often see potential time-travel stories that, alas, have no time travel. I track them, so that I don’t process these same chronotypical stories over and over in a time loop of my very own.
2008

 These arent the droids youre looking for . . . move along. 


 2008
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button by Eric Roth [backward aging]

Turok, Son of Stone by Evan Baily and Tony Bedard [secondary worlds]

“The Vortex of Youth” by Patricia Stewart [bizarre physiological aging]

Yesterday Was a Lie by James Kerwin [surreal]


34 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)