The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 2010



   How to Live Safely in a Science Fiction Universe
by Charles Yu
First publication: 2010

Holy Heinlein! Jim Curry kindly gave me this book as a retirement gift. It is more of a lit’ry work than a science fiction novel, and as such, I wish it had more deeply explored the question of free will.

 Im saying: you are stuck in a time loop. If you take that call, then you always took that call. You always take that call. Its got to be self-consistent with the rest of this. If you pick up that phone, its just one more thing that well have to do again. And who knows what complications it leads to. 




   The Time Machine Diorama Kit
by Monsters in Motion
First released: Jan 2010

Who doesn’t want their very own Time Machine diorama complete with Rod Taylor, Yvette Mimieux, a Morlock (standing), and another Morlock (lying in repose)?

 Above average model skills recommended. 1:8 scale. 


from fodey.com newspaper generator

   “Chronomechanic”
by Duncan Shields
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 1 Jan 2010

Duncan Shields is one of the more prolific writers at 365 Tomorrows—quite possibly producing 365 time travelers on his own—and for me, this is one of his better stories.

Normally, I don’t like suicides in stories because I feel that the topic is often approached in a shallow manner, but in this case, Shields’s hero has a hobby of tracking and trying to understand teen suicides while he philosophizes about the alternate universes created by time travel.

 I suppose as hobbies go, its a little dark. Whatever. It keeps me humble, rooted in the now, happy to be alive, and aware of death. 




   “Married Life Is Strange”
by Kathy Kachelries
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 12 Jan 2010

I love the cavalier attitude of this woman whose sweetheart invents things. Must be a metaphor for something.

 I knocked on the door to the garage. “There is a Frenchman in my kitchen,” I said. 




   “The Times That Bleed Together”
by Paige Gardner
First publication: Flash Fiction Online, Feb 2010

With the help of a little man in a grey suit, Luke Russell thinks that he can fix a horrific event of the past.

 “Its a time machine,” Luke says. ”Im going to fix it.” 




   Sponge Bob Square Pants
created by Stephen Hillenburg
First time travel: 15 Feb 2010

Admitedly, I don’t watch the porose crusader, but I did hulu one time-travel episode, “Back to the Past” (15 Feb 2010). I wonder whether Rick, my marine biologist friend, watches Sponge Bob.

 This device allows us to transport into the future or past, at a date or destination of our choosing. Unfortunately, the consequences of altering the order of history are so dangerous [thunder], weve chosen to leave it alone. So you mustnt touch! 




   Coke Zero Commercial
First aired: 8 Mar 2010

 Isnt it time to bend time? 




   時をかける少女
English title: The Girl Who Runs Through Time (translated from Japanese)
aka Time Traveller: The Girl Who Leapt Through Time
adapted by Tomoe Kanno (Masaaki Taniguchi, director)
First release: 13 Mar 2010

Riisa Naka (Japanese voice of Makoto in the 2006 Anime adaptation) plays the daughter, Akari, of a grown-up Kazuko (from the original novel). Akari tries to leap back to the time of her mother’s first love, Kazuo, in hopes that he can bring her mom out of a coma induced by a car accident.

 So you believe me? Youre an SF geek, right? 




   The Penguins of Madagascar
created by Tom McGrath and Eric Darnell
First time travel: 13 Mar 2013

In one episode (“It’s about Time”), Kowalski invents the chronotron (“So why not just call it a time machine?”, asks Skipper.)

 So while were at it, why not just call the Great Wall a “fence,” Mona Lisa a “doodle,” and Albert Einstein “Mr. Smarty-Pants”? 




   Hot Tub Time Machine
by Josh Heald, Sean Anders, John Morris, et. al. (Steve Pink, director)
First release: 26 Mar 2010

Three middle-aged losers (along with a nephew) head back to their teenaged bodies at a ski resort twenty years earlier.

 Yes, exactly. You step on a bug and the fucking internet is never invented. 


   “The Time Traveller Smith”
by JC McLaughlin
First publication: ebook, Apr 2010

Watchmaker apprentice Maxwell Smith is hurled by an explosion from 1908 London to a dystopian 2008.

 But thats the thing, Miss Brown, dont you see? I did not vanish from the face of the Earth, I merely vanished from time. 




   “Grandfather Paradox”
by Ian Stewart
First publication: Nature, 29 Apr 2010

I didn’t understand the logic of this short story, which is part of Nature’s Futures series of short, short sf stories. The grandfather, Hubert, is traveling forward in time, begging his grandson to kill him so that he won’t invent a time machine that he’s already invented—but I can’t see how killing him after the fact will do any good. Please explain it to me!

In any case, thank you to the kind librarian at the Norlin Library who made an electronic copy for me when we couldn’ track down a hard copy of the journal.

 With its logical basis wrecked, the Universe would resolve the paradox by excising the time machine, and snap back to a consistent history in which Hubert married Rosie, with all of its consequences. 




   Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time
by Boaz Yakin, Doug Miro and Carlo Bernard (Mike Newell, director)
First release: 9 May 2010

In ancient Persia, young street-urchin Dastan noble behavior draws the attention of the king, who brings the boy into the royal family as an equal with two other princes. As the boys grow up and lead the king’s army, they conquer the magical city of Alamut. But when Dasmat and the Alamut princess are forced to flee after being framed for the king’s murder, Dasmat realizes that the entire reason for attacking Alamut in the first place was a deception. Of course, he also realizes that he’s in love with the princess and that her magic dagger can turn back time minute by minute.

 Incredible! Releasing the sand turns back time. 




   Through the Wormhole
hosted by Morgan Freeman
First episode on time travel: 23 Jun 2010 (Season 1, Episode 3)

The time-travel episode of this Science Channel series is worth watching just to see interviews with the likes of Frank Tippler, Kip Thorne and Analog’s own alternative scientist, John G. Cramer.

 Thats the way that entanglement works; and so, if I put a spool of fiber optics in here thats, say, 10 kilometers long, then she would send the signal 50 microseconds after Bob received it. 

—John Kramer




   “How the Future Got Better”
by Eric Schaller
First publication: Sybil’s Garage, 7 Jul 2010

Images from the past: not time travel. Precognition of the future: not time travel. But images from the future: yes, time travel. (I know the rules can be difficult to grasp, but it will come to you.) In this case, the whole family, plus the Willards from next door, gather ’round to see the first broadcast of their own future.

 In the future, I got a beer. 


The story also appeared in this 2012 collection.   “The Battle of Little Big Science”
by Pamela Rentz
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 2010

A council of Native American elders has been funding Agnes Wilder’s project to view the past, but now they’re ready to cancel the shoestring budget because they haven’t yet seen a demonstration of the technology.

 When can you make the machine work? 


   “Superluminosity”
by Alan Wall
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 2010

After Jack Reynolds, a historical phenomenologist, has an affair, Fiona demands that he use the time machine he stole from a shut-down program to retrieve a fancy handbag from the early 1900s.

 Prove it then. Prove it by doing something for me. Something special. 




   Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
by Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall (Wright, director)
First released: 13 Aug 2010

Yes, Scott Pilgrim also travels back in time (when he’s defeated at Level 7)!

 Steal my boyfriend, taste my steel! 


from Chaponda’s website   “By His Sacrifice”
by Daliso Chaponda
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

In a hidden underground compound, a group of scientists raise nineteen children including Saul Baron, who years ago warned us of the coming nuclear disaster and saved the world.

 The man chuckled at himself because of the bewilderment on Sauls face. “The fuckin’ messiah and you dont even know it.” 


The story also appeared in this 2014 Johnson collection.   “Written by the Winners”
by Matthew Johnson
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

Dave Lawson’s job is sifting through artifacts—e.g. old episodes of Family Ties, LPs from the 80s, etc.—for snippets that no longer fit the officially approved timeline, but his decidedly more dangerous, clandestine avocation is preserving those very anomalies.

I found the idea of how time travel changes the timeline in a piecemeal manner, leaving behind inconsistencies, to be thought-provoking, although for me, the story’s ending was incomplete.

 The device that had changed time was more like a shotgun than a scalpel: It had established the present its makers wanted through hundreds of different changes to the timeline, some contradicting others. The result was a porous, makeshift new history that made little sense, but the old one had been thoroughly smashed to bits. It was those bits that remained that he and his department were tasked by the new history’s makers with finding and erasing. 


   “Backlash”
by Nancy Fulda
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 2010

Counter-terrorist agent Eugene Gutierrez, who suffers from flashbacks of his wife’s death, is contacted by a young time-travel agent from his own future with a plea to stop Gutierrez’s own daughter from setting off a chain of terrorist events.

 It is possible to create a set of coherent relationships between individual tachyons, similar to quantum entanglement. 


   “Red Letter Day”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Analog, Sep 2010

Without completely forbidding it, the government allows limited time travel: Each person may send a single letter from himself or herself at age 50 back to age 18 with information about a single event, though not everyone sends the letter and not everyone approves of the procedure. Our narrator did not receive the letter when she was young, and now she approaches 50 as a counselor for others who do not receive a letter.

 You know the arguments: If God had wanted us to travel through time, the devout claim, he would have given us the ability to do so. If God had wanted us to travel through time, the scientists say, he would have given us the ability to understand time travel—and oh! Look! Hes done that. 


   “Conditional Perfect”
by Jason Palmer
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

Like all the other yahoo teens, Paitin and his buddies head to an alternate past for a Friday night of violent hunting whomover they happen to spot from their hovercrafts. But unlike the others, Paitin plans to stay behind to be with unReal Sandra.

 Paitin shook his head. Civics 101: conditional perfects are neither citizens nor their ancestors. Therefore, they are not real. 


A few years after this story, Emrys published her first chapbook, A Litany of Earth.   “Correspondence”
by Ruthanna Emrys
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

Dena Feinberg, a psychology grad student who dreams of being a hard scientist and/or a Victorian time traveler, writes a compelling message on a stone table for future time travelers.

 The hard part was figuring out what to say. I needed something that would matter enough to the inventors of time travel that they would want to come visit me, right along with Jesus and Galileo and Heinlein. 


from peterclines.com

   “The End of the Experiment”
by Peter Clines
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

In the twenty-first century, on the very spot in London where Wells’s traveller first had his dinner party, physics student Jon has a similar party with his own friends and his own tiny model of a time machine.

 At the heart of it was a small seat carved from wood, almost a saddle, and before it was a console, barely two inches across, decorated with levers of what looked like glass and bone. 


   “Midnight at the End of the Universe”
by Eric Ian Steele
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

Wanting to see the end of time, Matheson travels forward in his quaint machine only to be greeted by the athletic and immortal telepath, Rococzky Saint-Germain, who is somewhat distainful of time travelers. Together, they watch the universe collapse.

 Even so, he grew nervous each time he left the pod—ever since that encounter with the Fascist Government of Greater Britannia in the twenty-second century. Not to mention the alligator population that plagued London after the Great Flood in the twenty-third. That had caught him completely unawares. 


from Wood’s web page   “One One Thousand”
by Willaim R. D. Wood
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

When Dr. Heller’s scientific contraption goes awry and threatens the universe, it’s fortunate that the machine is also a time machine to take Aaron back one day, albeit in a manner where his time rate is a thousand times faster than (most of) those around him.

 Static past. Unmoving. Like wandering around in an old, overexposed photograph. 


from Hull’s website   “Perpetual Motion Blues”
by Harper Hull
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

In a future world being evacuated by spaceships, four travelers try over and over again to get to the evac point, each time with all of them being slightly older versions of themselves.

 What this mean, Howard explained, was that the traveler could only jump to a time and place where they had previously existed. The traveling version of the person would take the place in the world of the old version, with all the knowledge they had gained since that time kept intact. 


from Edwards’ web page   “Professor Figwort Comes to an Understanding”
by Jacob Edwards
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

In a series of flashbacks over Professor Figwort’s eighty-year life, we learn of his first love letter (the failure of which prompted his discovery of time travel) and his three subsequent great discoveries.

 It was then that he devined a solution to his new-found problems: he would travel back in time and stop himself from disturbing Miss Bonsoir in the first place—on any level, molecular or otherwise. Yes, that ought to do it. While he was there, he might even return those now-overdue library books. 


Jianshi Jiao’s Legoland
Time Machine
   “Rocking My Dreamboat”
by Victorya
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

 There lay a Legoland Time Machine kit that he always imagined belonged to his father. There was no image on the box, just Think of the Time and Place, and Go! written in precise lettering across the side. 


An excerpt from this story appeared on Timelines website.   “Spree”
by John Medaille
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

An unnamed man who can shoot supersonic baseballs and bullets through time starts his time travel agenda by assasinating Hitler. And so on.

 The Time Traveler tinkers with the pitcher, increasing the torque and velocity of its engine and by the little, sickly hours of the early morning he is finally able to successfully launch three Major League regulation baseballs into the late Mesozoic Era. 


The story also appeared in this 2013 Onspaugh collection.

   “Time’s Cruel Geometry”
by Mark Onspaugh
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

We learn what really happened after the Time Traveller left his 1895 London house for the final time, and along the way we also learn the answer to what happens should he meet himself.

 In those trials he saw her die more than a dozen times, and it nearly drove him mad. If he was not sure he could rescue her, he might have set the controls for the far distant future when the sun would engulf the Earth. 


Shortly before this story, Goodman published The Apocalypse Shift, which is being made into a movie.   “The Woman Who Came to the Paradox”
by Derek J. Goodman
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

Reggie heads to 19th century Austria to kill baby Hitler, but once there he runs into Reggie-B (among others).

 “When you stopped me from stopping me,” Reggie-B said, “you ceased to exist because I never became you. But if I never became you then you never existed to stop me from stopping me. 


   “XMAS”
by Douglas Hutcheson
First publication: Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, Sep 2010

In a world where Japan won World War II and went on to conquer the world, a father (amidst pesky attacks) recounts history (including the roles played by time travel) to his two spoiled children.

 I thought you were old enough for big-kid toys. 


   “The Window of Time”
by Richard Matheson
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sep/Oct 2010

Eighty-two-year-old Rich Swanson, “Swanee,” knows that he’s a burden living with his daughter, so he decides to rent a room on his own, but instead finds himself 68 years in his past, but still at age 82 and uncertain about why or what he can do in the years of his childhood.

 Of course! How had I missed it? If there was any reasonable point to all this . . . 




   A Rip Through Time Pulp Series
by Chris F. Holm, Charles A. Gramlich, Garnett Elliott and Chad Eagleton
First story: Beat to a Pulp 90, 3 Sep 2010

This series of stories (available in a 2013 e-book collection) follows pulp hero Simon Rip through time as he first takes care of problems caused by H.G. Wells’s traveller and then searches for Dr. Berlin, a later inventor of time travel.
  1. The Dame, the Doctor and the Device (2010) by Chris F. Holm
  2. Battles, Broadswords, and Bad Girls (2011) by Charles A. Gramlich
  3. Chaos in the Stream (2011) by Garnett Elliot
  4. Darkling in the Eternal Space (2011) by Chad Eagleton
  5. Loose Ends by Garnett Elliot
  6. The Final Painting of Hawley Exton by Chad Eagleton

 But to my way of thinking, all of the events of existence have already happened, and are therefore immutable. Thus, there are no so-called ‘time paradoxes.’ 


The story also appears in this 2013 collection.

   “Fiddle”
by Tim Pratt
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 6 Sep 2010

How did Nero fiddle while Rome burned if the fiddle wasn’t invented until the 16th century?

 At any rate, ready your cameras and make sure your bows are rosined. 






   Warehouse 13
created by Jane Espenson and D. Brent Mote
First time travel: 7 Sep 2010

The secret service does more than just protect the president: Agents Myka Bering and Peter Lattimer (under the guideance of Artie, not to mention the help of girl genius sidekick Claudia and slighty psychic landlord Leena) also gather and protect remarkable scientific artifacts from throughout history. H.G. Wells shows up at the start of Season 2, but time travel didn’t appear until Episode 10 of that season, when Myka and Pete head to 1961. Later, in the first episode of Season 4, after the deaths of all and sundry (not to mention the demolition of the warehouse), Artie goes back in time again (at great expense to himself). I was expecting more time travel in Season 5 and was not disappointed when our favorite agents follow the evil Paracelsus back to 1541 (“Endless Terror”) to prevent the creation of a warehouse of horrible human experimentation; plus there’s a smidgen of 1942 time travel in the mushy (in a good way) series finale.

 Pete: Im not gonna remember . . .
Artie: Remember what?
Pete: Remember dying.
Artie: No. No, Pete, you wont remember. [Pete dies.] But I will . . ., I will. 




   Celestial Elf’s The Time Traveller
by Celestial Elf
First publication: 26 Sep 2010

Using the Four Winds Sims animation packet and pieces of the Radio Theatre Group’s audio play of The Time Machine (based on the 1948 Escape radio program), Celestial Elf produced an eight-minute animation. Looks like they had fun.

 with grateful thanks to H.G. Wells for his Inspiration & to Koshari Mahana for use of Four Winds 




   “In His Prime”
by K.C. Ball
First publication: Every Day Fiction, Oct 2010

After being stripped of his license to box for refusing to be inducted into the Army based on his religious beliefs, the Greatest finds himself in a dreamlike locker room being prepared for a fight while the crowd outside cheers his name.

 He remembers going to bed, tired after a long day of training, and he remembers noises in the night, the rush of cool air over his bared body, but he doesnt recall how he got here; wherever here may be. 


The story also appeared in Jonathan Strahan’s best-of-the-year anthology.   “Names for Water”
by Kij Johnson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2010

I didn’t understand this poetic story of a failing engineering student, Hala, who imagines that a phone call of white noise is many different things, one of which is a call from the future—but I am delighted by the mastery of language by my former teacher at the University of Kansas Center for the Study of Science fiction. She and I also had a perfect day climbing in the western foothills of the Cascade Mountains.

 It is the future. 


   “The Termite Queen of Tallulah County”
by Felicity Shoulders
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2010

When Lacey Tidwell’s dad has an attack that leaves him unable to communicate, she completely takes over the family exterminator business including the occassional time-travel trip to delete the origins of various bug problems. I enjoyed the story, but was annoyed that Shoulders brings up the paradoxes without offering any solution.

 Termite Trouble? You Can Turn Back Time! 




Young Bruce reads good magazines, too!

   Altitude
by Paul A. Birkett (Kaare Andrews, director)
First release: 3 Oct 2010

Sara, whose parents died in a small-plane crash when she was a child, now has her pilot’s license and is taking a group of friends to a concert in a small plane. One of the group is her boyfriend, Bruce, who has the power to make weird 1950s comic book stories come true: So we get a nice dose of in-flight mechanical failure, horrific monsters, wng-walking heroics, and a piece of time travel that certainly could have come from an E.C. comic. (The most horrific monster, though, is Sara’s best friend’s jerky boyfriend who—you’re not gonna believe this!—destroys an actual 1950s comic book!)

 Arent you listening? I made these things come true just by thinking about them! 


Brons, a librarian, has also had stories published in Two-Fisted Librarians.

   “Time Crossing”
by Adena Brons
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 9 Oct 2010

A young couple waits in line 45 days so that they can emmigrate to the 14th century.

 The Public Release, 47 years ago, had created a wave of emigration as other times were suddenly opened to those seeking other lives. 


from Albert’s website

   “Addendum to the Confessions of St Augustine of Hippo”
by Edoardo Albert
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 15 Oct 2010

A man visits Saint Augustine in the final days of the of Hippo, where the future saint tells him how his own son (and others) traveled through time in dreams.

 I wrote once that the more I thought about time, the less I understood it. 




   “Flipping the Switch”
by Michael Vella
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 29 Oct 2010

A scientist building a time machine regrets never spending time with his understanding wife and young children.

 I just had an intense déjà vu . . . 




   “Hwang’s Billion Brilliant Daughters”
by Alice Sola Kim
First publication: Lightspeed, Nov 2010

Because of Hwang’s problem, he ends up in odd, far future times, trying to make connections to his daughters.

 Whenever Hwang goes to sleep, he jumps forward in time. This is a problem. This is not a problem that is going to solve itself. 




   “Over Tea”
by T.M. Thomas
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 2 Nov 2010

An accidental time-traveler in the times of the American Revolution has tea and a philosophical discussion with a much older time traveler.

 And Ive been trying to figure it out for forty-seven years. Im going to solve it now, so you know. 




   Regular Show
created by J.G. Quintel
First time travel: 2 Nov 2010

Two park groundskeepers, Mordecai (a blue jay) and Rigby (a raccoon), live out a surreal sit-com life twelve minutes at a time, including some encounters with time travel such as the do-over that Mordecai wishes for after a bad first kiss with a red bird named Margaret.
  1. Prank Callers (2 Nov 2010)    back to the eighties
  2. It’s Time (4 Jan 2011) Time Pony takes Mordecai back to episode start
  3. Night Owl (31 May 2011) contest to win a car goes to 4224 A.D.
  4. Bad Kiss (4 Sep 2012) redo a bad first kiss
  5. Exit 9B (2 Oct 2012) back in time two months to save the park

 All I know is guys from the future lie. 

—Mordecai in “Bad Kiss”




   “The Man from Downstream”
by Shane Tourtellotte
First publication: Analog, Dec 2010

Americus, a despondent time traveler, comes to the 1st century Roman Empire (726 AUC) to introduce clocks, steam engines and other marvels.

The original publication of this story is followed by a Shane Tourtellotte article, “Tips for the Budget Time-Traveler,” about the economics of trading through time.

 He argued to the scribes that they were naturals for typesetting jobs: literate, intelligent, good at fine work and at avoiding mistakes. “Most of us thought we knew. There were many congenial mealtime arguments about which overarching theory of time travel was the true one. I had my ideas, but they dismissed them. I wasnt one of them; I didnt understand.” He ounded a fist into his thigh, a startling burst of violence. “But their theories were such violations of common sense!” 




   Chinese 7up Commercial
First aired: Dec 2010

   


   “Uncle E”
by Carol Emshwiller
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2010

Twelve-year-old Sarah decides to keep her mother’s death quiet so that the kids can all stay together, but somehow the previously unknown Uncle E gets wind of the happening.

 We have a hard time getting to sleep—except for Elliot. 




   “The Sound/Fury Variable”
by Steven Odhner
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 15 Dec 2010

A mad scientist wants to travel back to meet God before He destroyed Himself to create the universe we live in.

 I have one shot for this, one chance to meet my maker. 




   “Palindrome”
by William Arthur
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 28 Dec 2010

Mike, a time patrol type of character, finds himself in a yoyo of a time loop.

 Of all the types of time snags Mike had seen since joining Timeguard—recursive, crablike, anagrammatic—palindromic was the worst. 


The story was reprinted in DSF’s Year One anthology.

   “The Plum Pudding Paradox”
by Jay Werkheiser
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 29 Dec 2010

H.G. Well’s traveller goes back in time to persuade J.J. Thomson to not allow Rutherford to observe the nucleus of an atom.

 Rutherfords work will lead to a new theory called quantum mechanics. Its nearly an inverse of your model, a central positive nucleus surrounded by a negatively charged cloud. 




   NBA Back-in-Time Commercials
First aired: 2010/2011 Season

 Stephen? Stephen Curry? Your dad played in the NBA? 


And Still More Time Travel of 2010
The story pilots haven’t yet taken these adventures out for a test drive.
  “Adam” by Clint Wilson, 365 Tomorrows, 11 Jun 2010
—android wonders about origin of life

  “Return to Sender” by Dennis Gray, 365 Tomorrows, 7 Oct 2010
—accidental retrieval of past dignitary

  “The Great Leap Ahead” by Matt Matlo, 365 Tomorrows, 1 Dec 2010
—leaping ahead a few millennia

  “Future Saviors” by Duncan Shields, 365 Tomorrows, 25 Dec 2010
—making best possible world



Romance Time Travel of 2010
Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
MacCoinnich 2: Silent Vows by Catherine Bybee

MacCoinnich 3: Redeeming Vows by Catherine Bybee

A Kiss in Time by Alex Flinn

Outlander 7.1: A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows by Diana Gabaldon

Viking II 10: Dark Viking by Sandra Hill

Magic of the Highlands 1: Highland Destiny by Laura Hunsaker

Civil War Brides 1: The Bride Price by Tracey Jane Jackson

Civil War Brides 2: The Bride Found by Tracey Jane Jackson

Civil War Brides 3: The Bride Spy by Tracey Jane Jackson

Daughters of the Glen 5: A Highlander's Destiny by Melissa Mayhue

Daughters of the Glen 6: A Highlander's Homecoming by Melissa Mayhue

MacGregor 2: Between Now and Then by Terisa Wilcox



Close, but No Time Travel
These are not the stories you’re looking for. Move along.
“The Hand from the Past” by Christopher Anvil, The Power of Illusion, 2010 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Sunlight and Shadows” by John Sunseri, Timelines: Stories Inspired by H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, 2010 [no definite time travel ]

My Name Is Memory by Ann Brashares, Jun 2010 [reincarnation ]

“And Happiness Everafter” by Gerald Warfield, Timelines, Sep 2010 [virtual reality ]

“The Time Traveler” by Vincent L. Scarsella, Timelines, Sep 2010 [long sleep ]

“The Value of Folding Space by Tim Patterson, Daily Science Fiction, 3 Nov 2010 [just teleportation ]

 


78 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)